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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-03-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.'
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and tie Big Ten News Service.
-- 13cniaod c mkit 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusvely entitled to the use
for republication of 'all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi; paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Tbird Assistant Postmaster-General.
Saibscrip'tion during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
nai4es:Student Publicaticns Building, Maynard Street,
Anti Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Tn.,4 East Thirty-Founrth Street, New York City; 80
Boy on Street, Boston; 612. North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGIN'G EDITOR .. .......THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDI2TOR......................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR................... ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA DITOR...................JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
0. Ferris, John C. ealey, George Van Vleck, Guy M.
Whiipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
st11en, 2Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
~John err, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth IParkcr, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur $. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, Arthur M.
Taub.
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Placc, osalie Resnick, Jane Schneider. I
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGE.R . . BERNARD E. SCHNACKEX
W...N'S BSIN.SS MA.AGER......................
.."."........... CATHAR.INE MCHENRY]
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Serviee,Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tioni and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.l
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.C
Jane. Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursiey, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Flore7,-DorisIxrn~y, Betty Orevc,.Fillle Griffiths. Janet
Jackson, 'Louse Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.

of Michigan, is more concerned with loading u
the mind of the student with various and unre-
lated trifles than it is with giving him a thorough
understanding of a few related subjects. He dis-
cusses at length the difference between these
two types of teaching, and is obviously of the
opinion that the latter is superior. In sum, Mr.
Roberts argues that the crying need of American
education is to co-ordinate within the student the
basic, fundamental concepts of learning, and to
let him work out the rest for himself with a mini-
mum of instruction from above.
Thus far we agree with him; but, however flat-
tered we are at Michigan's being chosen as the
subject for this inquiry, we are not convinced that
the University of Michigan is typical of American
higher education. Under the leadership of Presi-
dent Ruthven, a man who is both far-seeing and
scientifically minded, we are engaged in a series
of experiments to find how the best in education
may be achieved.
During his five years as head of the University,
President Ruthven, with the aid and guidance of
departmental heads, has undertaken to remove
the stigma of "intellectual inertia" which Mr.
Roberts notes. To cite one of many examples,
there is the concentration program, the true
worth of which will not be seen until all students
in the literary college are under its requirements.
This program, it is planned, will give one a deep
rather than a shallow education; will give one a
thinking mind rather than a storehouse of irrel-
evant and widespread facts.
This, then, is our chief criticism of Mr. Roberts'
article. He has, evidently, inquired concerning
Michigan's educational methods, but he has not
sought to find out her aims. He has based his
opinion on what he has heard from students,
seemingly without seeking to supplement this
knowledge from more authoritative guides.
A cursory examination will also show several
minor slips. In discussing the prerequisites for a
bachelor's degree in journalism, he seems to have
arbitrarily chosen them from the literary college
catalogue, and those he lists are merely in the
mechanics of journalism. These courses, he says,
are all that are necessary for a degree. Yet he
fails to mention, or is ignorant of the fact, that a
detailed and closely related study must be made
of political science, economics, sociology, and kin-
dred subjects before one can obtain a degree in
journalism from Michigan. He mentions "the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and Arts, known to
every undergraduate as the Lit College." We sus-
pect Mr. Roberts of inventing that detail, for
within the memory of man the colloquialism has
always been the "Lit. School." He describes "the
main street of Ann Arbor as running past Angell
Hall." Evidently Mr. Roberts failed to travel west
of Division during his sojourn among us. His lack
of vision is also noticeable when he mentions the
number of bookshops in town, which he places at
two. Off-hand we can count eight in the imme-
diate campus area alone.
In relating his interviews with various students,
he writes that he talked to those who are known
as B.M.Q.C.'s and to men who pay a dollar a week
for their rooms in boarding houses, using the
terms antithetically. There is no artistocracy of
wealth at Michigan, Mr. Roberts, and a B.M.O.C.
is quite as likely to be poor as anyone else.
Qn the whole Mr. Roberias' article is not bad. We
reiterate in conclusion that we are in complete
agreement with his final statement, that Michigan
fashions of education are beginning to show
hopeful signs of change.
About Books

r'

Screen Refections
AT THE MAJESTIC
444 "LADY KILLER"

FRE-LIMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schifier, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avner, Kronenberger, Jim oriskey, Tom
Clarke. Scott, Samuiiwl Bckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomrlinren, Dean Asselin, Lymani
Bittman, Joh;i' Park. Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Harden brook, Gordon Cohn.
VIX _ _ _-- - --- --- - ne
NIGHT ELDITOR: JOHN C. HEALEY
Happy Burlhiay
Dean, CooIey..
C ONGRATULATIONS and Many
Happy Returns to our Grand Old
Man!
Michigan numbel s among its faculties and
alumni many men of outstanding attainments in
various fields of human knowledge and activity,4
but it is doubtful that there is concentrated in
one individual such a diversity of contributions to
the general welfare as in Mortimer E. Cooley.
Dean Cooley caine to the University from ,the
U. S Navy as the first Professor of Mechanical
Engineering 1881. From 1904 to 1928 he served it
as Dean, and it can be said without prejudice that
its present stapding and reputation are largely
due to his whole hearted and untiring efforts.
Not only recognized as a leader in his profession,
as evidenced by his election as president of va-
rious national societies, he also has given liberally
of his time and energy to public, civic and na-
tional affairs. The Spanish War saw him again
in service with the U. S. Navy. In Ann Arbor he
has been President of the Common Council. He
has served the State of Michigan and otherstates
as the pioneer in methods of railroad and other
puliiic utilities appraisals, and in Washington as
a member of several important national commit-
tees. He even found time to run for election as
U. S. senator on the Democratic ticket, but in
this case misjudged the time.
And now, after a well earned retirement from
active service, we see him still in harness and
busier than ever as State Engineer for the Federal
Administration of Public Works under the NRA.
So now, without fear of arrest, we raise our
glasses and drink (west of Division Street) a toast
of Long Life, Happiness and many more birthdays
to Mortimer E. Cooley.
Editor's Note - This editorial, a perfect ex-
pression of Daily sentiment, was contributed by
Dean Herbert C. Sadler, who has succeeded Pro-
fessor Cooley as Dean of the College of Engineer-
ing.
"Murmuring
Michigan" . . .
T HE CAMPUS is talking about Ken-
neth Roberts' article, "Murmuring
Michigan," appearing in the current Saturday
Evening Post. Mr. Roberts is an able commenta-
tor; he paints a rather adequate picture of Mich-

Dan Quigley .............James Cagney
Myrna Gale ................ Mae Clarke
Margaret Underwood . .Margaret Lindsay
For the brief period of two days (yesterday and
today) James Cagney again cavorts on the per-
forated sound screen of the Majestic Theatre.
This reviewer has always had a fond spot for Mr.
Cagney somewhere in his shrivelled heart, and
it is with the air of the proud father that he
lwarns his readers not to miss the "Lady Killer."
Hollywood likes to gorge itself sick with grand-
iose, colossal, spectacular screen extravaganzas,
but when it sobers up for a moment or two, it
usually turns out of its intricate machinery a
film in which all superfluous material is left
out and all of the elements of goo. movie comedy
retained. In the final analysis, films of the type
of "Lady Killer" are the only kind which America
can produce with a feeling that she alone can
do the job adequately. England can make a
"Henry the Eighth"to equal a "Queen Christina."
Rene Clair in France can release a "Sous Les
Tois de Paris" on a par with any Maurice Chev-
alier romance. Soviet Russia can produce a "Road
to Life" perhaps superior to a "Wild Boys of the
Road" of America; and Germany can easily turn
out a political satire like "De Hauptmann Von
Kopenick" as good as an American "Washington
Merry-Go-Round." But when it comes to fast ac-
tion pictures full of verve and pep, America has
not even a runner-up in the field.
In brief, the story concerns itself with Dan
Quigley's embroilment with a gang of card sharps,
with whom he enters into a partnership after he
has discovered the ingenuity of their game. When
one of their victims dies because of the rashness
of one of the members of the gang, they are forced
to break up and flee in all directions of the globe.
Dan and Myrna land up in Los Angeles. When
Dan is picked up by the police, Myrna deserts and
runs off with one of the other members of the
gang. The police can not convict Dan and release
him. He gets to Hollywood and after a series of
hilarious experiences as an extra in the movies, he
builds himself up in the eyes of the studio execu-
tives by sending volumes of fan mail to himself.
Eventually he gets to be a star.
James Cagney is not just a wise-cracking bag of
wind. He is a neat little actor who does not have
to depend on the director for a good perform-
ance. His personality escapes from every part of-
his anatomy: from his fingers, his head, his eyes,
his inflections. With a self assertion that more
than makes up for his slight stature, he manages
to impress one as being strong and powerful.
The bill of fare includes a Fox Magic Carpet
short called "Tbe Desert Patrol" which is one of
the finest educational shorts exhibited in this
theatre in a long while. Its forte is photography,
which is equal in beauty to that in the recent
"Thunder Over Mexico." -J.C.S.
Music ah4Drarn
'THE GONDOLIERS" WILL
CONTINUE COMBINING PROCESS
By SALLY PLACE
and JOHN W. PRITCHARD
MUSIC, DANCING, PLASTIC ART, and the
theatre have heretofore existed on campus
almost independent of each other. In the forth-
coming production of "The Gondoliers," however,
these departments will be co-ordinated in an at-
tempt to produce a whole which will be harmoni-
ously combined and in all ways pleasing. Music,
of course, will be supervised by the music school;
dancing by the physical education department;
colorful costumes by the architectural college; and
the Thespian angle by Play Production. The Gil-
bert and Sullivan comic opera will thus be a sec-
and and more advanced step in the process of
combining various related departments, the first
having been the very successful dance recital last
December.
"The Gondoliers," which will be produced on
the stage of the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre to-
night through Saturday night, is in every respect
an experiment, according to Valentine B. Windt,
director. Yet the co-producers are not unmindful
of the fact that this experiment is to be presented
before a critical audience. They are presenting a
modernization of Gilbert and Sullivan - a stylized
production which disregards the time-worn Gil-
bert and Sullivan tradition.

Moreover, the pedagogical value of this enter-
prise is kept constantly to the fore. The chief
reason for the selection of "The Gondoliers" in
preference to another light opera, at this time, is
that in this operetta the parts are evenly divided;
there is no part that stands out to the sacrifice
of another. This gives the students a fair basis of
competition. Also a double cast has been prepared
which enables more students to appear in promi-
nent roles. Strong competition for the parts has
arisen, and the choice of one student only indi-
cates that he has arrived at a certain advanced
stage in assimilating the course,- and does not
necessarily intimate that one student is better, in
the long run, than another. The chorus is a
vital part of the production, adding much gaiety
and charm to this delightful work which is good
music as well as good theatre.
Even in light opera an illusion of reality must
be achieved, if it is to compete with other drama-
tic forms. "Music must come inevitably from emo-
tion," says Mr. Windt. "Opera will survive 'if it
meets the requirements of the theatre; if it com-
bines, in ther words, its motivation with well
aligned body movement and perfection of voice.
In the ideal opera, speaking and singing must
blend."
To give piquancy to "The Gondoliers," no tra-
ditions have been considered. Since Gilbert and
Sulivan were great satirical artists, the comedy

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UI Y FJLLA STRAW, by David
ong: Alfred A. Knopf (1934) $2.50
Slater's and Wahr's) A Review:

Cornel De-
(On Sale at

FOUR DAYS
MAY 9-10-1 1-12 1934

By ALBERT K. STEVENS
HIS "first novel" by a Michigan young man is
the kind of thing many readers of The Michi-
gan Daily have wanted to write. Many a youth
who has emerged from the insularity and narrow-
ness of his home community into the liberating
atmosphere of college has dallied however briefly
with the idea of writing a novel to show up the
bigotry, the hypocrisy, and all the other flimsy
shams and limitations of the environment above
which 1e has risen or with which he has broken.
Sinclair Lewis wrote his and called it "Main
Street." But most of us don't get our novels
written; hence it is good for us who come from
one of the many colonies of the Middle West
where Old World groups and their American-
born children are trying to perpetuate a snobbish
insularity to read "Belly Fulla Straw."
Distracted by the cheap and noisy America
whose mass-production benefits they eagerly ap-
propriate, such groups have lost contact with the
real spirit of the Old Country; yet they com-
monly feel superior to "mere Yankees," and when
this feeling of superiority is heightened (as it
usually is) by the semi-fanaticism of a dissenting
religion, what results is an insufferable festering
of smug and cruel self-complacency. In the case
of the Michigan Dutch (who call Grand Rapids
their "Jerusalem") it was once the custom for
partially-Americanized children to trail new im-
migrants down the streets, chanting,
"Dutchman, Dutchman, belly fulla straw,
Can't say nothing but ja, ja, ja!"
David Cornel DeJong, recent graduate of a
Grand Rapids college, whose own experiences as
an immigrant boy provide the substance for some
of his most brilliant passages, traces with fidelity
to typical experience and with startling accuracy
of detail the course of Harmen Idema and his
family, who twenty years ago left the serene and
solid Netherlands and settled in Grand Rapids,
Michigan. We watch the family as it makes its
first painful adjustments to the raw crudities of
the transplanted Dutch community, and we ob-
serve its gradual degeneration into unthinking
Americanisms -its loss of a sense of values. In
the end Harmen, who, unlike his wife and chil-
dren, is throughout a free spirit seeking the good
life, turns away in disgust, his belly filled with
straw, and goes back alone to the home near the

Six

CONCERTS

I

HILL AUDITORI UM
PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT
Eqrl V. Moore, Musical pirector Eric DeLamarter, Associate Cond
Frederick Stock, Orchestra Conductor Juva Higbee, Young People's Cond
LUCREZIA-BORI-..........-... . . . . . . . . . . . . . opro
Metropolitan Opera Association
ROSA PONSELL . . . ... . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Sopro
Metropolitan Opera Association
JEAN ETTE VRE ELAND .......................Sopra
American Concert and Oratorio Singer
COEGLADE..............................Contra
Chicago Civic and other Operas
PA L A LTHOUS .............................. Ter
Metropolitan Opera Association
ARTl1J' HACKTT.......... ................ Te
American Opera and Concert Singer
T EDORE WEBB...................... . . Barito
American Oratorio Singer
CHASE BAROMEO...........................
Chicago, LaScaIa, and South American Operas
GUI A BUSTAO .... . ........ ................Viol'
Young American Virtuoso

uctor
uctor
'no
no
3no
Ito
nor
nor
ane
ass
list

+MISCHA L EVITZKI.'.'........ . ... . . . . . ......-
Distinguished Russian Player
MABEL ROSS RIHEAD................. . . ......
Choral Union Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN-.........................
University of Michigan Organist

Pianist
Pianist
Organist

. ti,

The University Chorgl Union . 300 Voices The Stanley Chorus . 40 Vices .
Chicago Symphony Orchestra .70 players Ninth Symphony ... .. ... Beetboycg
Young People's Festiyal Chorus 400 Voices The Seasons . . ........ y
American rmiere (specially translated The Ugly DucklingE
P .y. g y ......_ _. .....- . _tag. s

I

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