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January 28, 1934 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aching Profes sion Held Lax
In Rejecting Misfit Candidates

I

Heads Local Ministers

Teachers have grossly failed to
take advantage of the available in-
strumentalities in order to reject the
misfits among the candidates for
teachers' certificates, according to
Prof. Raleigh Schorling of the School
of Education.
In discussing the situation Profes-
sor Schorling pointed out that the
army, during the World War, was
forced to sort out a great number of
men in order to choose its officers.
Because the army took advantage of
the opportunities offered it in the use
of objective devices it has set a
standard which it would be particu-
larly advantageous for educational
authorities to follow, he said..
Of the various types of measures
which can be recommended Professor
Schorling pointed out that there are
several, essentially necessary, which
have to date been neglected. Among
these are: that the teacher have at
least the intelligence of the students
whom he is to instruct, that an effec-
tive standard of scholastic achieve-
ment be set up which can then be
correlated with subject matter to de-
termine ability and thus adaptibilityl
to the problems of teaching and the
use of a comprehensive test in basic
English.
As a suggested judgment scale of
;rospective teachers, Professor Schor-
ling recommends tests to include
3omprehensives in the applicant's
major subject, as well as in his
ninor subject and English. A test of!
mowledge of pedagogical principles
and in general culture would be wise.1
This, in combination with a thorough

review of the applicants scholastic
record from an accepted four year
college, is suggested as a basis for
the granting of a four-year provi-
sional certificate.
"A common sense use of the scale
would eliminate some prospective
teachers because they are too low in
native ability, Professor Schorling
said. "Some would fail because they
would be shown to be illiterate, still
others would fail because they do not
even know the fundamentals of the
subject which they profess to teach.
I feel that a record of all of the
items in the scale and probably sev-
eral others, as for example some
measure of community adjustment,
should be undertaken. These data
should be carefully scrutinized by a
group of research workers in order
to check back and see how effective
these standards might have been had
they been applied. In brief, we need
now to make the best guesses that
we can and then set up research ma-
chinery which, at the earliest possible
moment and by the exacting meth-
ods that a scientific education af-
fords, will validate the procedure."
Coy yOf Columbus Ma)
Discovered In Turkey
(By Intercollegiate Press)
CHICAGO, Jan. 27. - An old map
has been discovered in Turkey which
is believed to be one which was copied
directly from the original which was
the guide Columbus used on his voy-
age which ended in the discovery of
the New World.

REV. CARPENTER

Nerro Pastor
Now Head Of
Church Body
Succeeding the Rev. Harold P.
Marley, Socialist Unitarian who is
now an investigator in the coalfields
of southeastern Kentucky, the Rev.
Charles William Carpenter, pastor of
the Second Baptist Church, has be-
come president of the Ann Arbor
Ministerial Association.
Mr. Carpenter was elected vice-
president of the Ministerial Associa-
tion at a recent meeting of that or-
ganization. He will hold the presi-
dency until the return of Mr. Marley
some time in September.
The associations new president has
held his pastorate in Ann Arbor since
November, 1929, and has had exten-
sive experience in the ministerial
field. He has served as pastor in
Muncie, Ind., Marion, Ind., French
Lick, Ind., Toronto, Ont., and Evan-
ston, Ill.
He was born 47 years ago in Stan-
ford, Ky., and secured his prelim-
inary education at the public schools
there and at Indianapolis, Ind. He
has studied at Tuskegee Normal and
Industrial Institute of Tuskegee,
Miss., Wilberforce University, and the
Garret Biblical Institute, of Evan-
- ---

Entries By 54
Freshmen End
Annual Contest
Hopwood Contest Winners
Will Be Announced In
The Daily Feb. 13
Entries for the Freshman Hopwood
Awards closed yesterday with 63
manuscripts submitted by 54 contes-
tants in the various divisions. Names
of the winners in this competition
will be announced Feb. 13 in The
Daily.
The essay, prose fiction, and poetry
comprise the three types of writing
in the freshman contest. Three prizes
of $50, $30, and $20, respectively, will
be given in each field.
Of the 63 manuscripts, 32 were in
the essay division, 21 in fiction, and
10 in poetry. The number of man-
uscripts is the smallest that has been
submitted since the contest began in
1931-32 although there was one more
contestant this year than in the con-
test two years ago. Last year 58 per-
sons submitted 92 manuscripts.
Prof. Erich A. Walter of the Eng-
lish department, chairman of the
committee on Freshman Awards, said
that a few of the manuscripts stand
out more than in the past. The gen-
eral quality is lower, especially in the
poetry division, he said.
"In previous years the essay sec-
tion has been the weakest but we
find that this year it is the strong-
est of any, Professor Walter stated.
"Most of the manuscripts are longer
than those submitted in former years.
Some of the pseudonyms are interest-
ing - among them are such titles as
Gypsy Lee, Jane Austin, Elizabeth
Fielding, Allen Arbor, Daye Knighte,
J. Psmith, and N. Bickerquick."
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman of
the English department, Dr. Frank
E. Robbins, managing editor of the
University of Michigan Press, and
Wilfred B. Shaw, director of alumni
relations, are the judges of the con-
test.
ston. Mr. Carpenter has also studied
under Prof. George W. Carver, noted
Negro scientist.
Mr. Carpenter is married. He has
no children. He lives at 216 Beakes
St., adjoining his church.
----

Dorothy Tyler, who won the ma-
jor fiction prize of $2,500 in the 1931-
32 Hopwood contest, hasirecently had
a short story published in the Winter

McCooey's Successor?

Hopwood
Writes

Prize
For

t

;

f

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
Established 1863

Oldest National Bank
In Michigan

I

Every Banking Service Available
Domestic - - - Foreign

-Associated Press Photo
Frank V. Kelly leader of the fourth
assembly district in New York, was
mentioned as one of the men most
likely to succeed to the Brooklyn
Democratic leadership made vacant
by the death of John H. McCooey.

Winner
Magazines

Under U. S. Government Supervision
Member Federal Reserve System

number of the Yale Review.]
is titled "My Uncle George
West."
Miss Tyler is now in Engl
ing and studying. She has
eral poems and critical e
Scribner's and in The N~w IR

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