100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 27, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE. MICTI GAN DAILY

SATt

IGAN DAILY

:I

" V M
.

war. One may add, that such duty devolves
equally upon every citizen, male and female. In
the course of his well thought out argument Lt.
- McDonald makes some minor points which per-
haps would better have been omitted-such as
the possibility of an officer's increasing his
chances of coming back alive, that an officer
learns how to handle men, that an officer earns
$200 (a month) and that, in case of war, he will
be an officer and will have some idea of what'it
is all about (comment: but will he?k. These
points are quite extraneous to the real question,
which is: "Are there valid reasons for the ex-
istence of the R.O.T.C.? The present writer is of
the opinion that there are valid reasons. Such
being the case, the organization can stand on its
own feet and does not need any artificial props
such as the points made by Lt. McDonald.
There is one thing I should urge in this con-
. nection, viz., That joining the R.O.T.C be not
made compulsory in schools and colleges.
ion - M. Levi, Professor Emeritus

Established 1890
every morning except Monday┬░ during1
ar'and Summer Session by the Board
ident Publications.
,he Western Conference Editorial Assoclat
m News Service.

$soriatd {olciteadrSS
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Th.Asoiated Press s nclllsively entitled to the use
r rpyibli ation of all'news .dispathes credited to it or
ot otherwise gredit n ths paper nd 'the local news
>ullished herein. Al rights of republication of special
lispatches are reserved.
Entered .at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
eond class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
[l'h #Assitant Postmaster-General-
8ubscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
1. 0, During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
na.i, $4.25.
Ofices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
im Arbor, Michigan. Phone; 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
#nc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
3ylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
icago.
A, 'EJW(flRJALSTAFF
eephone 95
0ANAOI .EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CI3IT R . .. .. ..BRACKLEY SHAW
TO!L DIRECTOR.... ..... ...C HARTSCHAAF
RTB EDITO...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
ItAMA EDITOR...,OHN W. PRITCHARD
W.OMEWS EDITOR .............CAROL J. HANAN
G~HT E TORS: A. Elis al, Ralph O. Coulter, Willam
Derr s, JoinC. eley, George Van Vieck, Guy M.
WhppI, Jr.
UPQUTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie
Western
NOMLEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorpe Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
EPQRUTER: Q. Bradford Carpenter, Ogden G. Dwight,
Pal J. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Thomas E. Oroehn.,
Joh 1Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Rihard E. Lorch, David
G. iMacdnald, Joel P. Newman, Kenneth Parkr, Wil
"am R. Reed, Robert . Ruwitch, Robert ., t. Clair,
Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, A 9Lhur M.
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Marie
" 0d, leanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean,
rueyre arrison, Say rPlace, Rosalie Resnick, Kathryn
' letdyk, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BU8INE8S MANAGER..........W. GRAFTON SHARP
3REDIT MANAGER ...BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
............. ......CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her--
trick; assified Advertising, Russell Read;vAdvertising
~ Contracts, Jack Bellamy; 'Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Acounts, Allen Knuus; Circulation, Jack Ef-
rrsymsoni.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
Ia e Bassett Virginia Bell, Mary ursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Dly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson,, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
Farewell To
Huey Long..9
T HE HUEY LONG dynasty in Louis-
iana is at an end. Tuesday's pri-
mary for mayor of New Orleans, in which the
anti-Long c a n d i d a t e, incumbent T. Hemmes
Walmsley, defeated John Klorer, Long candidate,
by nearly two-to-one, completes the disintergra-
tQIOn of the Kingfish machine. The Long future is
definitely downward.
Long was another of those phenomoma that
the American democracy sometimes spews out of
the ballot box. He came from the back woods via
the barn and the alley pool room. He was a big
boy; loud, pugnacious, coarse, conceited, a bad
man to meet when he had five drinks under his
belt on a Saturday night. This type of man al-
ways make an appeal to his kind. They like his
rawness. They like to see him standing on the
soap box, crying to high heaven against the rich
and the mighty. He is their man, all theirs, and
they go to the polls in moronic droves to put their
X's next to his name, for he is their idol and their
hope. He is "one of our kind of folks."
This type of man always disappoints his fol-
lowers. There is nothing he can do but talk. He
has no intelligence, no background, no responsi-
bility. He makes a noise and calls it action. The
office is for him a splendid opportunity to swash-.
buckle his way through the front pages, the ro-
togravure sections, and the news reels -always
bawling his own name, eternally patting his own
back. And underneath this effontery there is the
loot of office which neither he nor his satellites
ignore.
The pubic gets on to him after a while. The
decent citizenry is at first shocked, then mad. It
goes after him. He bellows his defiance, but the
steady disapproval of public opinion wears him

down. His followers, disillusioned, desert him.
He is left alone with his vapid folly: "Long is se-
questered in his hotel room as numerous lesser
leaders are deserting him. The senator is re-
ported to be in a surly mood."
Huey Long is on the way back to the grass roots;
where he came from and where he belongs.

To the Editor: -
The observation of "A Good American" in
Campus Opinion recently, while terribly written
and in parts utterly senseless, shows nevertheless
that our controversy over R.O.T.C. or campus
military training is at least opinionated on both
sides. Yet neither group has presented a com-
pletely sound stand for or against the aboli-
tion of RO.T.C units. As Prof. Slosson suggests,
it is to be hoped that students will come to formu-
late opinions, if they do not now, and to expressly
maintain them until they are proven erroneous
Yet it must be said that there are some of us
who would like to see these opinions based on
sound reasoning, and observed facts.
For the great majority of students the whole
matter probably has become a bore, for most stu-
dents are indifferent to the question. There are
two other groups of students: the men in the
R.O.T.C. or those for its maintenance, and those
against it. The group which now so loudly at-
tacks R.O.TC. consists undoubtedly of the small-
est number. Nevertheless, if either side of our
controversy has anything sensible to say it would
be of interest, for a change, to many of the stu-
dent body.
-- R. L. Kimball
The" Theattre
MAX REINHARDT
TO BE AT ORCHESTRA HALL JAN. 21
PREDICTED by Pavlowa to become the great
dance star of the world, Nini Theilade, Max
Reinhardt's premiere danseuse, is to dance at
Orchestra Hall in Detroit Wednesday evening Jan-
uary 21, under the auspicious of the Detroit Town
Hall Series
Mlle. Theilade is only 18. At 14, when she was
studying under Madame Ergerowa, at one time
prima ballerina of the St. Petersburg ballet, Pav-
lowa saw her dance. Greatly moved by her per-
formance she turned to her companions and said.
"I am the present. This child is the future.
People talk of me now. In the future they will
talk of her."
It was Pavlowa who arranged for Nini's Euro-
pean debut at the Hague - an appearance which
was followed by a tour of Germany, Switzerland,
Holland, and Scandinavia.
When Max Reinhardt saw her dance in Stock-
holm, he immediately invited her to join his com-
pany. She has been his premiere danseuse in his
last four big European productions.
Emile Vuillermoz, writing of her first Paris per-
formance, said in "Excelsior", "It is evident that
in her we have found one destined to become a
great luminous star of the dance. Undoubtedly
we shall regard her tomorrow as one of our most
cherished and precious artists." The Paris Soir re-
ported. "The whole press salutes this great new
discovery. Her art is amazing."
In her recitals, Ni*$ Theilade mixes classic
with the modern school. She dances to the music
of Grieg, Chopin, Mozart, Debussy, Albeniz,
Brahms, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Delibes. She has
created almost all of her own dances.
Rare racial strains mingle in Theilade's blood.
She was born in Java and lived there until she
was nine, when her family moved to Denmark.
Her mother is a Hindu from the ruling caste of
Java and the granddaughter of an ex-Sultan of
Java. Her father is a Danish journalist, who
through two generations of Danish clergymen
was descended from the French Admiral H.
Thaylade.
Nini Theilade's performances, originally sched-
uled for the morning of Jan. 31 at the Wilson
Theatre, was changed to Wednesday evening at
Orchestra Hall, because of the unusual interest. ir
her Detroit debut.

should be dedicated to the legion of his ruined
victims.
- St. Louis Post Dispatch
THE SKIES HAVE CLEARED
FOR MR. BRISBANE
Long years ago William Randolph Hearst fell
luckily upon the endless lode of newspaper-buyng
pennies waiting for the man who would publish
"a paper, for people who" can , conceivably
"think," but who hate to be forced to when they're
reading a paper. Following that rich vein further,
he discovered that a pied piper who would lead
the largest percentage of infant minds to the news
stands must play only the simplest native air, to
wit: America is the biggest, strongest, purest, all
around dandiest place on earth.
To him and to his Mr. Brisbane, then, the spec-
tacular features of international news provide
continual opportunities for wild bell ringing.
Every evidence of superiority, every threat of
strength by a foreign power is the occasion for
deploring the puny ineffectiveness of an American
army and navy which should be the strongest in
the world. Vast was Mr. Brisbane's horror at the
fact that Balbo and his fleet, however magnificent
their feat of last summer, had proved that a for-
eign squadron of bombers could swoop across the
ocean and destroy New YFork in an hour. For
Mr. Brisbane's respect for bombs and poison gas
is far greater than his respect for his readers'
minds.
Now, at last, with the publication of his column-
of yesterday throughout the country, America's
fears for the comfort of its syndicated best friend
may be laid at rest. With the arrival of the Amer-
ican Naval Air squadron at Pearl Harbor Mr.
Brisbane has at last cast off his possessing aero-
phobia, he is able to announce that there is some
hope. The flight, he says, is at least "a warning
to any nation harboring foolish plans for attack-
ing the United States now or later." And he wants
it understood that we must have on hand, in case
any foreign diplomat should grow ferociously in
the belief that America's leading mode of trans-
port is still the pony express, "five thousand planes
that would visit every one of your cities quickly
with explosive bombs and poison gas, if you were
ever foolish enough to interfere with this peaceful
country."
This little matter attended to, Mr. Brisbane's
timorous heart will cease its wild flutterings; and
he can turn his "Today" column for "people who
think" in words of one syllable over to nature
but who hate to be forced to when they're
study and kindred topics. The wild clattering of
his tin sword will cease, his hectic cries of "gas,
run for your lives" will fade into the distance, and
there will be at last, in every sense of the word,
a reasonable chance for peace. It seems almost
worthwhile.
- Daily Princetonian

i

Your Last Chance to Rent
Those Vacant Rooms
A Clas sifi ed Adt costs bui a few cents.
A Vacant Room costs many dollars.
LAST REGULAR ISSUE, JAN. 28
Classified Rates
le a Line, Cash 14e a Line, Charge
HE MICIGAN DAILY

Ii l t F s e ,. :,_...

ForII e Fut xrN

a
F
E
i'
1
t
}

Musical Events
OPERA IN DETROIT

THE Chcago Opera Company, (Inc.) will bei
Detroit at the Wilson Theater for a fou
week engagement, beginning Sunday night. Tb
operas are being given at popular prices.
The schedule for the week is:
Sunday "La Boheme" .............Puccini
Monday "Aida" ......................Verdi
Tuesday "Faust" ..................Gounod
Wednesday "Cavalliera Rustiacana" Mascagni
"I Pagliaci........... Leoncavallo
Thursday "Madam Butterfly" ......Puccini
Friday "La Forza del Destino" .........Verdi
Saturday: matinee "Hansel and Gretel"
(in English) ..... ....Humperdinck
Saturday evening "Il Trovatore" ....Verdi

in
[r-
he

a
n
1
a
e
!

1he Jdlop reserved] in, all {of 'is
Ile Mchigyan Daily will publishaie-
Lare of the Grand March in the J-Hop
Extra .. .
he Daily will also have for sale a lim-
ited number of glossy prints of the
('a tid March (10"x 22"), ideal for
On sale the night of the Hop at the
Intramural Building and later at the
Student Publications Building.

ESE lYE YOURS NOW

COllegiate Observer

Phone 2-1214

r
S
h
u
a'
1
is

As Others See It
THE REFUGE THAT WAS GREECE
With Edgar Allan Poe, it was "the glory that
was Greece."
With Samuel Insull, it is "the refuge that was
Grreece."
In Poe's case, it was a poet's impersonal regret
for a golden wonder that had gone. In the case
of Insull, it is the poignant despair of the dis-
enchanted wanderer, against whom all the doors
are closed, save the breeze-swept gates of Chi-
cago. That statement may not be the precise
fact, but it carries the impress of truth. For the
highest court of Greece has declared Insull must
go, and there is, practically speaking, no place
to which he can turn but the country from which
he is a fugitive
The verdict was a foregone conclusion, after
the similar ruling of the Minister of the Interior.
So the battling, litigious visit in Attica, which has
,- .. t rc .. l a Ham a ifr niffn n +he f+5nnte

By BUD BERNARD
A Haverford University professor said that stu-
lents striving for A, are barren of personality L
while the C students are the salt of the earth.
These are some of the things that the
editor of the daily of the University of Kansas
would like to hear:
Our prof in a shay course saying: "Don't
even bother taking the exam - you've got a
cinched" . . . Galli Curci singing St. Louis
Blues" . . . Joe E. Brown and Joe Penner
shaking hands with each other and saying
"You're good Joe," each in his own inimitable
way . . . someone griping because semester
exams don't come four times a year.
The University of California will start a class
in ballroom dancing for the masculine population
of the school if enough of them make known their
desire.
We nominate this crack coming from The
Daily Illini for the worst of the month --
The Italian gals fear Mussolini 'cause he's
the Fascist man in Italy.
A professor of Botany at Butler University has
had his name included in the volumes of "Who's
Who" since it has been published, yet he holds no
college degree.
Many a student who succeeds in the ap-
proaching final exams will be the one who
knows how to use both grammar and "cram-
mer."
At Northwestern University the secret is out.
It has been discovered what the co-eds have been
doing with their spare time: Due to the depres-
sion and the lack of pin money they have been
playing ping-pong. Tournaments are held monthly
at the dormitories.
S * *

L

First Methodist
Episcopal Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worship.
Sermon Subject:
"Religion Interviews
Jesus"
Dr. Stair, preaching
STALKER HALLT
For Uiiversity Students
12:15 -Seminar' on Applied Chris-
tianity.
"Jesus' Teaching on Wealth."
6:00-Guild Devotional service. Sher-
wood Messner. President of the
S.C.A., Will speak on "E-sential
Considerations in a Christian
Life."

DO NOT
NEGLECT

YOUR

Re-Acv iti-es

'I

Zion Lutheran
Church
washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stelnhorn, Pastor
9:00 a.m.-Bible School. Lesson topic:
"The Life in Kingdor"
10:30 A.M. -Service with sermon on
"Salvation By Grace"
5:30 P.M.-Student Fe11,wshp and
Supper
5 :45 F.M. - Prof. S. A. Hopkins will
address the Student Fellowship.

RELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

D5,
Campus Opinion
-- - - - - - - ni . -.Hn':o-miii i -l' ha nn.

St. Paul's Lutheran,
(Missouri Synod)
West Aberty and 'hlid Sts.
-- Jan. 23
9:30 aan. - Church School.

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets

St. Andrews
Episcopal Church
Division at Catherine Street
Services of Worship
Sunday, Jan. 28, 1934
8:00 A.M. - Holy Communion

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan