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September 19, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-09-19

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FOURe

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPT. 19, 1933

- unnummawwww"m

'HE MICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

you are with Romans you must be as the Romans,
and the same thing is true of fraternities and so-
rorities. If you don't like to fall in with the

. Wis.

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plans of the crowd, then you are inevitably
against the crowd, and will probably be happier
unorganized.
To summarize: don't fight shy of fraternities
and sororities because you think they will jeop-
ardize your academic career or lead you into the
ways of Satan. Don't join, on the other hand, if
you think you can't afford to, or if you feel you
are temperamentally disinclined. But if you like
to be with a crowd, if you like a large circle of
intimate friends, then don't pass up the golden
opportunity for four years of wholesome associa-
tion which some fraternity or sorority may offer
you.

THE
SPTLGH

I

- -
~IDi~j ,( I M+N7 LOrSN NT FW ( lbT k0,' 4 Fl f. iR rV A~i
Publish,;' every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of -republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
'Third Assistant P'ostmaster-General.
Subscription during sua er by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mnail. $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications.Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.1
Representatives: Colleg Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Ch icago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR................C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOTI..... ..........BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: Ralph G. Coulter, William G. Ferris,
John C. Healey, George Van Vleck, 'Guy W. Whiffle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: BarbarakBates, Elanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan, Marjorie
Beck.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Caspar S. Early, Thomas Groehn, Robert
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, ManueltLevin, Irving
F. Levitt, David G. MacDonald, S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell, George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph, Shapiro, Marshall D.
Silverman, I-Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
WOMEN A nTJ;RS: Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies,
Jean Hanxaer, Florence Harper, Marie Heid, Margaret
Hiscock, 2Etet&or Johnson, Hilda Laine, Kathleen Mac-
Intyre, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Mary
O'Neill, Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ........ . ...BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER...
.................. .....CATHERINE MC HENRY
IEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick;-Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Willard Cohodas, Van
Dunakin, Carl Fibiger, Milton Kramer, John Mason,
John Marks, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe
Rothbard, Richard Schiff, Robert Trimby, George Wil-
liams, David Winkworth
TUESDAY; SEPT. 19, 1933
A Welco-e,- .
A Challenge.
I T IS A PLEASURE for us to wel-
come the class of '37 to Ann Arbor.
Ahead of you lie friendship, the joys of social in-
tercourse, the stimulation of association with fine
minds, the inspiration of leadership, the loneli-
ness of thought. The University and all that goes
with it are for you to' possess, for you are the
reason it is here.
In addition to welcome; we offer you a chal-
lenge-a challenge to make the most of your
opportunities.
Four years from now you will graduate. It is
yours to determine whether when your Com-
mencement comes, you will look back with satis-
faction or with remorse upon your Ann Arbor
days. We wish you courage, and clear-sightedness,
and the generous favor of fortune in all the uni-
versity experiences the future holds for you.

Michigan Traditions
And Freshmen.
T IS ONE of the most attractive
traits of universities the world over
that they have traditions. If the reason were to be
searched for the universal affection of alumni
for their alma maters, it would probably be found
to consist very largely in the friendships begun
and knit -close through the observance of old
customs.
Fraternities, sororities, and similar organiza-
tions are built around traditional ceremonies.
Scholastic achievement is recognized by tradi-
tional rewards.
Like every institution old enough to have gained
the dignity of maturity, Michigan has her tradi-
tions. Some of them are manifested in seeming
trivialities, but the fact that alumni heartily en-
dorse them proves the real worth of what lies
back of them.
The first of these with which the class of '37
will come in contact is the wearing of pots.
Classes will begin next Monday, and at the same
time the men of '37 will assume the badge of their
yearling status in the form of a gray top-piece,
to be worn on all occasions, social and otherwise,
except Sundays.
There will be some refractory freshmen, who
will hake to be coerced by sophomores, but they
will lose the spirit of the tradition. For the pot
is the emblem of a freshman, and for him not to
wear it is to be disloyal to his class.
So band together against the sophomores, if you
must, but show them '37 is proud it's '37 by wear-
ing your pots.
ScreenDRflections
Screen 'ie,,
AT THE MAJESTIC
(Showing Through Tuesday)
"THE SILK EXPRESS"
"HEROES FOR SALE"
The first of the two current feature attractions
at the theatre on Maynard Street contains about
all of the elements necesary to provide thrills
through the medium of the screen. Practically
all of the action takes place on a fast-moving
silk express train-action which includes a dou-
ble murder, an incendiary fire, business intrigue,
the popular encephalitis, and a small amount of
love interest. And even though the cast includes
such experienced players as Neil Hamilton,
Sheila Terry, Arthur Byron, Guy Kibbee, Allen
Jenkins, Dudley Digges and Robert Barrat the
production could hardly be termed outstanding,
though it is the better of the two films on display.
The second, "Heroes For Sale," which stars
Richard Barthelemess and Loretta Young, has
one of the weakest plots of the season. Obviously
intended as a great moral play, the film left us
with the conviction' that some scenario 'writers
should be shot for making their characters do
such damn-fool things at times. And the moral
if we are not mistaken, could well be summed up
in the statement, "Look out for yourself-A num-
ber one-never plead for the masses when you
are well on the way to becoming a member of the
capitalistic class." The best acting in the pic-
ture is done by Aline MacMahon, famous for the
secretary role in 'Five Star Final."
(Showing Wednesday Through Friday)
"HER BODYGUARD"
"SCARLET DAWN"
The coming week-end brings to the Majestic
Edmund Lowe and Wynne Gibson in "Her Body-
guard," film version of a Corey Ford story, which
you might have read recently in Collier's. The
tale is all about a young lady who has climbed
the ladder to musical comedy stardom, learning
all the tricks on the way up. At this time her
job is to play a millionaire "sugar-daddy"
against her producer, The former, feigning to
protect her jewels, hires a husky, dead-pan
Irishman to serve as her bodyguard and see that
she has little or nothing to do with the pro-
ducer. Naturally, the bodyguard, played by Ed-
mund Lowe, soon begins to steal the center of
the picture and as a result-but that's enough,
you've read Corey Ford and you might know that
he can finish a story decently. Others in the cast
include Edward Arnold, Johnny Hines, Marjorie
White, Alan Dinehart and Fuzzy Knight.

Playing with the above will be the latest film
based ' on the Russian Revolution, "Scarlet
Dawn," displaying the combined talents of Doug-
las Fairbanks, Jr., and Nancy Carroll. The plot
concerns a young Russian nobleman who loses
his all through the great political upheaval and
then concentrates his efforts toward the winning
of a handsome young servant girl. The film, we
understand, is quite bloody, whatever its other
shortcomings.
AT THE MICHIGAN
(Showing Through Wednesday)
"DISGRACED"
"MIDNIGHT CLUB"
Helen Twelvetrees has the spotlight in the film
about the poor little gal who was led astray by

Wally Graham, managing editor of the 'Ensian
is a nice fellow but a little absent-minded. Last
semester Wally elected a two hour political science
course with a third hour of credit if he wrote a
thesis, which he elected to do. Forgetting all
about the thesis in the press of 'Ensian work, he
was surprised to find an hour of E among his
marks.
. * * *
Once the smell of printer's ink gets in the blood
it can't be escaped, they say. ' Chic" Vedder, last
year's Daily business tycoon, is back this year to
take the position formerly occupied by Miss Allen,
press building ghost, as auditor of student publi-
cations, and Ted McKay, former Chief Gargoyle,
is selling job printing for a local press to gullible
campus societies.
* *I .* *
In one of Ann Arbor's lohesome speaks this sign
is displayed in a prominit place over the bar:
THIS PLACE CLOSES A 7 10 P. M. SHARP.
PLEASE REGUL'ATE YO7RI)RINKS ACCORD-
INGLY. Early to bed -
* * * *
Bennington College in ermont is a school
glorying in the fact that- it has almost no rules
governing the student body,. Miss Anne Btrsley,
daughter of Joseph A. Bursley, dean of students,
is attending Bennington College this year.
* * *
Excerpt from a statement' b) Fielding H. Yost,
the "Grand Old Man of Mithigan," which has
been printed annually for many years on the
R. O. T. C.'s advertising leaflet for freshman. "I
look upon our present system of military training
primarily from the standpoint of the boy who re-
ceives it. My son, who is now undergoing his
second year in a military acddemy, is receiving
certain benefits which result from training of this
sort, I see the value of thi training reflected in
him in many ways. I see Ipve and reverence of
this country, her customs and institutions. I see
recognition of constituted authority and the re-
sultant discipline and self control that go hand
in hand with obedience and loyalty. I see broad-
ened shoulders and a broadened mind. I see in
him the values that spring from co-ordination,
co-operation, team-work, precision, accuracy,
promptitude." Could this be "Buck" Yost? Or
has "Hurry-Up" another son?
* * * *
After a wave of petty fraternity robberies dur-
ing the past Summer Session Bob Miller, former
varsity 'swimming team captain, rooming at the
Delta Phi house, took two western six-shooters to
bed with him, planned to inflict painful injuries
on any maurauders. The next night when thieves
entered his room, to'ok five dollars from his desk
and frisked his clothing, Two Gun Miller slept
peacefully through it, awakened next morning to
find himself robbed.
Last year's J-Hop made a profit, it has recently
been announced. With the "Old Maestro" Ben
Bernie for the leading band, 750 couples present
at $7 a throw, Don Pedro for a second band, elab-
orate decorations and a budget totalling nearly
$5,000, the intricate accounting system used by
Treasurer Robert Saltzsteii>has finally revealed
that the profit for the dance was $3.
The nsnuioal secretary of the "Lodge" arrived
in Ann Arbor last summer to inspect the condi-
tion of the local chapter Finding the Chi Psi
house unmantled for the u ner he went across
the street to the T. D. X. house, asked if he might
stay overnight. He was awakened the next
morning by the very irate porter who was inform-
ing him that he hadn't got no right to stay there.
The Thelta Delta Chi House, the astonished man
was informed, is reservedfor members of the clan.
does things in this picture too besides merely
looking like Adrienne Ames. William Harrigan
and Ken Murray are in the supporting cast.
' Midnight Club," in which Clive Brook is the
leader of a smart crowd.of London jewel thieves,
is above the standard oft1.average screen plays
seen in Ann Arbor recently. Assisted admirably
by George Raft, Helen Vinson and Alison Skip-
worth, the suave Mr. Brook gives a very con-
vincing performance, in a movie which has been
properly produced. The tale calls for a slight
stretch of the imagination perhaps, but it is none-
theless cleverly done and amusingly presented.
(Showing Thursday Through Saturday)
"MURDERS IN THE ZOO"

"COCKTAIL HOUR"
Charlie Ruggles, Lionel Atwill and Kathleen
Burke share honors in "Murders In The Zoo," one
of the two feature films to be shown at the Mich-
igan the latter part of this week. Miss Burke,
better known as the "Panther Woman," is the
young lady who won Paramount's nation-wide
contest in search of a woman who more nearly
resembled a panther-or something of the sort.
The prize which Miss Burke captured as the win-
ner of the contest was a lead part in the film,
"Island of Lost Souls." She has been publicized
as having the combined exotic characterizations
of Marlene Dietrich and Myrna Loy. The film
"Murders in the Zoo" concerns, so far as we were
able to ascertain, strictly that-murders in the
zoo.
Bebe Daniels, assisted by Randolph Scott, the
University of North Carolina graduate who also
plays in "Murders in the Zoo," plays the impor-
tant part in "Cocktail Hour," the second week-
end feature. The plot is woven about the case of
a successful and brilliant young woman who
wishes to taste life and all its pleasures without
the hampering cardons of matrimony. It's been
done before of course, but it should be interesting
to note how Miss Daniels goes about it.

v

WE HOPE. YOU
LIKE ANN ARBOR

- and we know that you
ful year at Michigan.

will have a most success-

It is our wish to have the privilege of serving you.
Remember that wherever you are - in the classroom,
on rushing dates, and at dances - your personal appear-
ance is of the utmost importance. When your trunk
comes in, call GREENE'S and our delivery service will
be at your door almost immediately.

15 %
SAVING
FOR CASH
and CARRY

GR EES
CLEANERS &DYVM~
ICRQCLEAN

15%
SAVING
FOR CASH
and CARRY

ONE-DAY SERVICE ON ALL CLEANING
AND PRESSING
Phone 2-3231

Il

p .
IIIE

Cleaners and Dyers
STORE LOCATIONS

516 EAST LIBERTY
1119 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

Wf O OUR ART

802 SOUTH STATE
MACK & CO. ANNEX

'No matter the color of the article GREENE is the best for cleaning
and pressing"

Religious$Activities

About Joining
Fraternities, Sororities..

."

First Methodist
Episcopal
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worship.
"You Shall Live"
Dr. Stair
6:00-Student Guild at Wesley
Hall, adjoining the Church.

DO NOT
N EGLECT
YOUR
RELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

Wesley Hall
For the Methodist students and
their friends, Wesley Hall
exists. It is open daily.
For the Students by the Students
A Religious Education
Program Begins 6 p. m. Sunday
COME

URING the coming week the fra-
ternity-sorority question will loom
large in the minds of a large number of in-
coming freshmen. To organize or not to organize
will have.to be answered within a few days, and
it is only natural that the rushees-to-be should
be giving the matter considerable thought.
What are, the advantages of membership in a
social fraternity or sorority?
In the first place there is the wholesome pleas-
ure of enjoying the university experience in in-
timate association with one congenial group.
Friendship is a big thing; while not denied,
surely, to unorganized students, organization cer-
tainly is a powerful stimulus to it.
In the second place, a study of scholastic aver-
ages indicates that membership in a sorority or
fraternity tends -to encourage academic effort. It
invariably surprises persons in general and par-
ents in particular to learn that the scholastic
ayerage of organized students is always higher
than that of the unorganized. Yet such is the
case, as it is revealed in black and white in the
statistics compiled each year by the dean's office.,
Most fraternities enforce freshman study rules
and forbid mid-week dissipation. And in acclimat-
ing himself to university standards and methods,
the erstwhile high school student finds associa-
tion with experienced upperclassmen invaluable.
Furthermore, membership in a fraternity or so-
rority is nine times out of ten a sound social in-
vestment. The ability to handle oneself socially is
an important art, and much of its technic may be
acquired through sorority and fraternity life.
And finally, membership in a fraternity or so-
rority is undeniably an aid to the student who
engages in extra-curricular activities. The days
when sororities and fraternities "ran things" are,
Allah to be praised, a thing of the past. But
brothers -and sisters who know the ropes are still
big helps, as well in the four-year process of mak-

The First
Presbyterian
Church
Huron and Division Streets

Greets

Invites Welcomes

ALL STUDENTS
Dr. Merle H. Anderson
Minister,
Rev.- Alfred Lee Klaer,
University Pastor
Student Classes at Church
House, 1432 Washtenaw Ave-
nue, Sundays at 9:30.
Worship Service at Church at
10:45.
Young People's Social Hour at
Church, 5:30; Young People's
Society at Church, 6:30.
BE AT HOME WITH US

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets
Sunday, Sept. 24th., 10:45
"Science Lends A Hand
To Religion"
By Harold P. Marley
7:30 p. m. meeting of liberal stu-
dent's union in Church li-
brary.

First Baptist
Church
512 East Huron
BAPTIST STUDENTS HOUSE
503 East Huron
Frienuds at Students House will
welcome you every dlay and
evening this week.
On Saturday afternoon a--hike,
games and picnic supper.
meet at Students House, 3:30.
Services Sunday, 10:45 a. m.
and 6:00 p. mn.
R. Edward Sayles
Minister
Howard R. Chapman
Director of Student Activities
Fred Cox, 25A
President Students' Guild
Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 a. m;-Bible School.

St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
Regular Sunday Services and
Meetings

FRESHMEN !
MAKE YOU R

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