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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1933 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

T entative Pla11s
Announced For
Musical Festival
Dates For Annual Affair
Set By School Of Music
As May.9, 10, 11, 12
SiX Concerts Named
Chicago Symphony Will
Be Featured In Forty-
First Festival
Tentative plans for the forty-first
annual May Festival, released recent-
ly at the executive offices of the
School of Music, name May 9, 10,
11, and 12 as dates for the 1934 pre-
sentation.
Six concerts will be provided: four
evening programs with matinees on
Friday and Saturday afternoon. The
series occurs earlier than in recent
years, beginning on Wednesday, May
9.
The opening program will probably
be an all-Beethoven program, one
part consisting of Beethoven's "Ninth
Symphony" which includes a quar-
tet of soloists, and during the other
section of the program, it is planned
to have an outstanding pianist per-
form one of the composer's piano-
forte concertos. The University of
Michigan Choral Union will partici-
pate in the "Ninth Symphony."
The Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Dr. Fred-
erick Stock, will perform the Bee-
thoven symphony, and also all or-
chestral and instrumental parts of
the festival.
Thursday evening, Haydn's "Sea-
sons" will be sung by the Choral Un-
ion, and will comprise half of the
program. The remainder will be pro-
vided by a distinguished violinist,
who will perform with the orchestra.
As in former years, Friday after-
noon will be given over largely to a
program of selections by the Young
People's Chorus with orchestral and
solo numbers interspersed.
At the evening performance, fol-
lowing the tradition of many years,
an outstanding operatic star will be
the attraction, with suitable orches-
tral accompaniment and supplemen-
tary works.
A symphony program will be pre-
sented by Dr.'Stock and the orches-
tra, and in the evening the. Ameri-
can premiere of Heger's "Ein Fried-
enslied# will be performed by chorus,
orchestra and soloists. This work is
being specially translated from the
German by Dr. Earl V. Moore, musi-
cal director of the School of Music,
and special choral parts will be
printed.
Dr. Moore will conduct the choral
offerings, and Juva N. Higbee will
direct the Young People's Chorus.
Dr. Frederick Stock and Eric DeLa-
marter will preside over the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra in the miscel-
laneous programs and in the selec-
tions for vocal and instrumental ar-
tists.
Harvard Gets Jump
On Ancient Rivals
(By Intercollegiate Press)
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 11.-
Someone around Harvard pulled a
fast one on Yale and Princeton, an-
cient rivals of Harvard on the foot-
ball field, although Harvard and
Princeton for a few years past have
been out of sorts with each other.
At the Yale-Princeton game at New
Haven, alumni and students of the

two universities were busy cheering
their respective teams when an au-
togyro lazily chugged overhead with
a huge crimson banner trailing be-
hind.
The banner said: "Send your son
to Harvard."
Les C o o p e r, a Princeton man,
piloted the ship to a New Haven air-
port, then skipped.
"I'm getting paid for it," he said.
"I hope I don't get shot."

Advocates Copeland Bill Before Senate Committee

Germs Lose Battle
4s New Antise tic
Looms in Cleveland
(By Intercollegiate Press)
CLEVELAND, Dec. 11. - G e r m s
haven't yot a chance when dosed
with a new antiseptic development by
Dr. E. E. Ecker, associate professor
of immunology at Western Reserve
University, and his assistant, Dr. L.
A. Weed.
The new antiseptic is 1,202 times
stronger than carbolic acid, and yet
has no detrimental effects on human
tissues and is non-poisonous.
Experiments have been carried on+
at Western Reserve and checked for
accuracy at other institutions in the
United States and in Europe in the
last five years and still all the possi-
bilities of the new medicine have not
been explored.
Medical men are particularly inter-
ested in the possipilities of its in-
ternal use. It is technically known
as phenyl mercuric nitrate and is dis-
tributed only to physicians at the
present time.
11'.r

Useful Gifts
for Christmas
A ZIPPER NOTEBOOK . . . . . $3.50 to $6.50
The most practical gift for anyone who is in school.
WORLD GLOBES . . . . . . . . $1.00 to $15.00
A gift for the whole family as well as the individual.
STATIONERY . . . . . ,. . . . .. . . . 25c up
A very large selection of stationery and note cards,
many arranged in attractive gift boxes.
CHILDREN'S CUT-OUTS .. . . . . . . 25c up
Including a great assortment of Doll Sets, Stencil
Sets, Crayon and Painting Sets.
DESK SETS . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. $1.95 up
Also pens and pencils in all the popular makes from
50c up.
VAN LOON'S GEOGRAPHY PUZZLE... 50c
These picture puzzles are educational as well as
interesting.

-Associated Press Photo
Secretary Henry Wallace (left) appeared before a Senate committee to advocate enactment of the Cope-
land bill to make more stringent the provisions of the pure food and drug act. He is shown with Senator
Royal S. Copeland (center) of New York and Rexford G. Tugwell, assistant Secretary of Agriculture.

University Students Are Shown
To Be Careless Nose Blowers

In this season of the year when
head colds are prevalent, it might
be well to know that, although in
themselves a comparatively harmless
and self-limiting infection, they can,
by improper care, progress into more
serious manifestations with disas-
trous consequences, according to an
official Health Service report, re-
leased yesterday.
One of the chief factors in the de-
velopment of more dangerous infec-
tions from a head cold, the report
stated, is the widespread habit of
nose blowing, improperly done.
When one has a cold, the mucous
membranes of the nose becomeswol-
len and inflamed. A large amount
of mucous is secreted in an attempt
to combat the infection, bringing
abbut a desire to blow the nose at
frequent intervals. However, if the
nose is not blown, the mucous either
Herbarium Boasts
220,000 Plants In
95 Year's Growth
The University Herbarium, started
95 years ago by Douglas Houghton,
pioneer Michigan geologist, today
boasts of over 220,000 examples of
plant life from every quarter of the
globe including hundreds of plants
found in Michigan.
In 1838 the Houghton botanical
specimens came to the University,
along with other natural history col-
lections made by this famous geolo-
gist. Thoughthe State originally in-
tended to charge the institution $4,-
000 for them, this proviso wascan-
celled in 1846.
A professor's home was the first
depository of the collection, where
they remained until 1841, when they
were removed to a large room in
Mason Hall, which became the Uni-
versity's first natural history mu-
seum.
In 1863 the Regents of the Uni-
versity could proudly report "an her-
barium, illustrative of the flora of
the state, containing about 1,500 spe-
cies, to which have been added about
400 species from the Southern states,
and 225 from Germany."

flows from the nose, .or else one
sneezes, thus clearing the nasal pas-
sages of the accumulated secretion.
During the past winter there were
five mastoid operations performed
upon University students, the major-
ity of which were caused by incorrect
blowing of the nose. It is suspected
that this habit causes about 90 per
cent of operations for mastoid, and
that it is frequently a cause of the
sinusitis associated with acute upper
respiratory infections as well.
The reason for the spread of in-
fection in this manner is that the
duct, called the Eustachian tube,
which leads from the back part of
the nose to the middle ear, is kept
closed by a very weak muscle, and
the increased intranasal pressure
brought about by blowing the nose
causes this muscle to relax. Thus
the infected material is often forced
up into the Eustachian tube where
it sets up a localized infection which
seals the tube, and, following the line
of least resistance,proceeds upward
through this easy route to the mid-
dle ear.
Such an infection in the middle
ear is characterized by severe pain
and deafness. If such acondition
occurs, an examination should be
made by a competent otologist so
that proper drainage may be estab-
lished and further complications pre-
vented, the report continued.
To diminish the risk of these com-
plications of the ordinary head cold,
it is well to know that the proper
drainage may be established and fur-
ther cozplications prevented, the re-
port continued.
To diminish the risk of these com-
DANCING EVERY NIGHT
Except Monday at
PREKETE'S
GARDENS
above
The Sugar Bowl
No Cover Charge
109 and 111 S. Main St.

plications of the ordinary head cold,
it is well to know that the proper way
to blow the nose is to hold the hand-
kerchief gently against it, compress-
ing neither nostril, and blow softly.
Never hold one nostril shut and blow
the opposite side forcibly. The nose
may feel somewhat obstructed after
the above procedure, but this is due
to the swelling of inflammation and
is not the result of accumulated se-
cretions, the report concluded. 4

AIRLINE
RESERVATIONS
Flight Instr action
Local Passenger Flights
Special Charter Trips
ANN ARBOR
AIR SERVICE
Municipal 9 -
i Night Phone 7739

SLAT ER S
"At Both Ends of the Campus"

4

all'.

-MM 1 11 _ i

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..r .u. wrw. .r .... . ......--

t - -

The Perfect

Christmas

In no other

way is it possible to show

your

own

Gift
IBcoI(S

good judgment and at the same time compliment
the taste of your friend than by giving a good book.
To make your book choosing easier we are listing
the titles of a few of the outstanding books.

SLATER' S BOOK STORES

FICTION
For the person.nwho
* enjoys a good novel, and
reads Cosmnopolitan
BONFIRE. By Dorothy Canfield.
$2.50
CHRISTMAS TREE. By Lady Ela-
nore Smith. $2.50.
ENCHANTED VILLAGE. By Ed-
ward Shanks. $2.00.
THE FARM. By Louis Broomfield.
$2.50
IDA ELISABETH. By Sigrid Und-
set. $2.50.
MASTER OF JALNA. By Mazo
de la Roche. $2.50.
NO CASTLES IN SPAIN. By Wil-
liam McFece. $2.50.
NO SECOND SPRING. By Janet
Beth Stokes. $2.50.
OIL FOR THE LAMPS OF
CHINA. By Alice Tisdale Nobart.
$2.50.
ONE MORE RIVER. By John Gals.
worthy. $2.50.
NEW POETRY
For those who like
t to have their fiction
in rhyme.
BOOK OF AMERICANS. By Rosc-
mary-and Steven Vincent Benet.
$2.00.
GIVE YOUR HEART TO THE
HAWKS. By Robinson Jeffers.
$2.50
STRANGE VICTORY. By Sara
Teasdale. $1.00.

BIOGRAPHY
It is a treat to read
* a biography that is not
a eulogy.
THE ARCHES OF THE YEARS.
By Halliday Sutherland. $2.75.
CROWDED HOURS. By Alice
Roosevelt Longworth. $3.00.
FLUSH: A BIOGRAPHY. By V ir-
ginia Wolfe. $2.00.
VINCENT VAN GOGH. By Julia
Meier Graefe. $3.00.
HISTORY and SCIENCE
For the quiet,
conservative person who
reads Popular Science
and Atlantic Monthly.
THE EPIC OF AMERICA. By
fames Truslow Adams. $2.50.
THE STARS in their COURSES.
By Sir James Jeans. $2.50.
THRILLERS
FOr the one who likes
* adventure stories, reads
Liberty or Colliers.
DRAGON MURDER CASE. By
S~. S. Van Dine. $2.00.
MURDER DAY BY DAY. By Ir-
vin S. Cobb. $2.00.
JUVENILES
For the boys
St, and girls who live their
fiction.
MOTHER GOOSE RHYMES. By
Watty Piper. $1.00.
SEA WALL. By L. A. Strong. $2.50

SILVER CHIEF: Dog of the North.
By Jack O'Brien. $2.00.
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS.
By Kenneth ?3rahame. $1.00.
CINDER. By Eleanor Youmans.
$1.00.
YOUNG FU OF THE UPPER
YANGTZE. By Elizabeth Lewis.
$2.50.
THE THREE LITTLE PIGS. From
Walt Disney's "Silly Symphony."
$1.00.
THE POP-UP BOOKS. Including
Mickey and Minnie Mouse. $.50 up
THE THREE ARTS
If they are lovers
t of the drama, music
or art.
ROCKWELLKENTIANA.
By Rockwell Kent. $3.75.
AH WILDERNESS! Ey Eugene
O'Neill. $2.50.
BEETHOVEN AS HE LIVED. By
Richard S pecht. $3.00.
MISCELLANEOUS
If/they are
t sophisticated and a
hard worker.
LIFE BEGINS AT FORTY. By
Walter B. Pitkin. $1.50.
MORE POWER TO YOU! By
Walter B. Pitkin. $1.75.
A handbook for getting the most
out of living, telling you how to tap
the hidden reservoirs of energy that
lie within you.

ROUND TRIP TO

Boston

$1760

WITH OUR SINCERE
WISHES FOR A
MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND A
HAPPY NEW YEARS

Special Through Coach with Greyhound
Dependability and Service

NEW YORK $14.85
CHICAGO $5.00,

ALBANY $14.75
BUFFALO $8.10

cDpfrUAI fCED inW

Other Fares at Proportionate Reductions
Call Now-

FINE BOOK BINDI
Books are bound by the handicraft g
of Maurice Inman. There is no b
gift of permanent and lasting value.
25% to 50% OFF
a.

4GS
uilds
etter

Slater's are giving a free chance on a six-foot
candy cane with each purchase of Children's
Books. Stop by and look in the window of
their State Street store.

FREE!

MICHIGAN UNION

THE PARROT

1' I * . I A tremendous assortment of Christmas Cards of all sizes,

11

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