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December 06, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M ICH IG A N DAILY WEDNESD

School Change
Advocated By
Radio Speaker
ome New Developments
In Instruction Pointed
Out By Prof. Schorling
"We must have a change in the
eparatory school curriculum that
nores the needs of students and
en thrusts them for two or more
ars into an economic world that
is already turned "thumbs down"
i them," Prof. Raleigh Schorling of
e School of Education, and super-
sor of directed teaching in Univer-
y High School, told a radio audi-
ce over the University hour Sun-
,y night.
"If we continue to neglect this vast
mber of boys and girls between
e ages of 16 and 21, we will be
tting the stage for a Hitler in
nerica," Professor Schorling said.
pointed out that the youth of
rmany "was swept off its feet by
e Hitler program not because it
s convinced of its worth but be-
use it offered the only hope, to a
uth that was being ignored. "The
lers staged a World War and youth
expected to pay for it by sacrificing
educational opportunities."
Ii telling the story of "Bill," a
;ical boy who doesn't get along well
his school work, Professor Schor-
ig showed the faults and weakness-
of the present educational sys-
m. He also dealt with the instruc-
n of dull pupils in relation to the
lividual, child, and in connection
th the increasing crime wave.
Sixteen suggestions to teachers
re pointed out by Professor Schor-
g to aid in the instruction of this
>e of class. Such procedures will
id to reduce disciplinary problems
the school, make better and more
eful citizens of our dull pupils, and
lp to preserve and improve our ba-
social institutions, he declared.
The greatest response to any pro-
am this year has come in after
ofessor Schorling's discussion Sun-
y night, Waldo Abbott, director of
oadcasting, announced.
.stronomy Curtis'
Broadcast Subject
The influence of astronomy upon
)dern thought was discussed by
of. Heber D. Curtis of the astron-
y department and director of the
servatory, over the University ra-
hour on Station WJR yesterday
ernoon.
Professor Curtis dealt with astron-
y more from the philosophical at-
ude than from the angle of the
tool audience. The theme of his

Thanksgiving Cooking
Increases Gas Figures
Ann Arbor had an elaborate, not
to mention sumptuous, Thanksgiving
if the amount of gas used gives any
indication.
Between 7 and 8 a. m. 45,000 cubic
feet were sent out all over the city,
and the figure gradually rose to 105,-
000 cubic feet from 10 to 11 a. m.
The high mark of the' day came dur-
ing the next hour when the output
was 127,000. By 2 p. m. most of the
activity had stopped as Ann Arbor
picked the bones for supper. The;
grand total for the day was 1,093,100
cubic feet. On past Thanksgiving
days the total has mounted to as
much as 1,268,00 cubic feet.
The following day, turkey leftovers
held the total down to 783,700 for the
day.
YESTERDAY
-NEW YORK - Mayor John P. O'-
Brien, when he retires Jan. 1, will
be the first New York mayor to be
placed on a city pension, it was an-
nounced today.
-, .' *
DECATUR,, Ala. - The decision as
to the guilt of Clarence Norrissec-
ond negro to be tried in the "Scotts-
boro Case," rests in the hands of the
jury.
4 * * '
WASHINGTON - The government
continued to keep its price of newly-
mined American gold fixed at $34.01
per ounce.
LONDON -Cabinet members pre-
pared a statement for presentation in
the House of Commons which will
indicate the future British policy to-
ward Ireland.
* * *
NANKING, China - All foreigners,
including Americans, were requested
to evacuate the "dangerous" Fukien
province where the Nationalist gov-
ernment is preparing an attack on
insurgents
discussion centered around the spir-
itual as well as the intellectual in-
fluence of the study of the heavenly
bodies.
Pointing out the infinity of the
universe, Professor Curtis concluded
with references to the modern theo-
ries and their reference to astronomy.

Faces Extradition

European, American Housing
Shown In Architectural Exhibit

A collection of material illustrating
European and American housing
made by the American Institute of
Architects and presented under the
auspices of the College of Architec-
ture is now on exhibit in the Archi-
tectural Building daily except Sun-
day from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m The ex-
hibition is open to the public.
"This exhibit, which was shown at
the Century of Progress last summer
and more recently at the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts during the Michigan
Planning and Housing Conference,
is one of the most systematic and in-
teresting exhibitions we have ever
had here," Prof. Emil Lorch, direc-
tor of the College of Architecture,
stated. "It is of interest to the econ-
omist and the sociologist as well as
the architect."
"We are unusually fortunate in
having secured the collection at this
time as there is a great amount of
interest felt in the subject because of
the proposed housing projects in De-
troit."
In the Detroit exhibit, which is
hung on the south wall of the main
exhibition hall, are shown pictures of
cthe present slum areas which will be
replaced by the new housing units,
architectural plans for the proposed
buildings, and an airplane view of the
downtown district showing the areas
under consideration. The plans be-
ing considered are structures of the
unit apartment type for block re-
I placement of dilapidated frame cot-

tages in the congested Negro district.
They feature the grouping of single
units around the perimeter of a block
to secure a large, unified open space
and cross draft and light for all
apartments.
In addition to the Detroit exhibit,
there are also drawings and actual
pictures showing the floor plans of
typical apartments and housing ar-
rangements in other cities of the
United States" and England, France,
Germany, Russia, Switzerland, and
Austria.
"One of the most interesting ex-
hibits," Professor Lorch said, "is that
showing an English 'garden city.' It
was one of the first attempts at
planned housing in the world and
was built before the World War. It
can easily be distinguished from the
post-war structures which are of the
single unit type because of economic
pressure following the War."
An indication of the importance of
the housing problem is shown by a
recent statement made by the Presi-
dent's Housing Conference which
said in part, "The houses of our
country constitute our largest mass
of obsolete and discredited equip-
ment."
"Most people do not realize the im-
portance of this problem," Professor
Lorch said, "and it is our hope that
the presentation of this exhibition
will help to make the people here
more conscious of this pressing prob-
lem."

Lippmann Weighs
U. S. War Policies
AMHERST, Mass., Dec. 5 -One of
the best ways to prevent another war
would be for the United States and
England to agree to maintain the
same policy in the event of another
war, Walter Lippmann, columnist,
told the Alumni Council of Amherst
College here.
"The role of the neutral in a mod-
ern war is not an easy one," he
said. "There have been two world
wars since the foundation of the
American Republic. We have been
drawn into both of them. It follows,
does it not, that since we decline to
resort to extreme measures to pre-
vent wars and since we know how
impossible it is to stay out of a world
war, there is but one clear course for
us and that is to devote our efforts
to confining the possible wars of the
future to the locality where they be-
gin.

Taggart Appointed
To Washington Post
Herbert F. Taggart, associate pro-
fessor of accounting in the School
of Business Administration, has been
appointed by the National Recovery
Administration as specialist on cost
analysis and its reporting under the
NRA codes, and has left for Wash-
ington on leave of absence from the
University for the rest of this semes-
ter.
Formulation of policy for the NRA
in respect to uniform accounting in
the companies of the signers of the
industrial codes, and co-operation
with trade associations in attempt-
ing to carry out their part in living
up with the practices prescribed in
the agreements will form the major
part of his work in Washington,
A civilization is now in the making
m which industry will not only be
one of the greatest factors but a vital
social force as well. -Frances Per-
kins.

-Associated Press Photo
The Supreme Court has ruled that
John "Jake the Barber" Factor, wait-
ing in Chicago to testify in the trial
of Roger Touhy and 4wo others for
his kidnaping, must return to Eng-
land for trial on charges of defraud-
ing British investors of $1,500,000.
WEAVER TO SPEAKc
The fourth in the series of art
forums sponsored by the Student
Christian Association will be pre-
sented at 4:15 p. m. today in Room
D on the first floor of Alumni Me-
morial Hall. Prof. Bennett Weaver
will speak on "The Fundamental
Principles in Literature."

f ': " 4 t

See
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wahr's
regularly.

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Our stock, is large and attractive with Prices ranging from one to
twenty-five cents the card. Personal cards can still be ordered.
We also carry a complete stock. of CHRISTMAS STATIONERY
in the form of letters, notes and cards.
BUY NOW-
WAHR'S BOOK'STORE

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off! ACT NOW ! Let Rentschler make your Michigan-
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You always get something better and different in
photography from Rentschler. There's much uncom-
mon excellence about them. Beat that deadline. Make
an appointment today. DIAL 5541.
Studio 319 East Huron Eastablished 1890

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