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September 19, 1933 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dean of Men

is Get
Gtades

More Than 700
Houses Ready

Dean Kraus Praises Spirit Of
Students In Summer Session,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI
Publication in the Bulletin Is constructive notice to all m3em.berm.
Univ ersity. Copy received at the ofrice cof the Assistant to thec Presidentr
3:30; 11:30_a. m. Saturday.

Pi iappa Ph, Kappa Delta
Lead List; Co-Eds'Marks
Surpass Those Of .Men
G ramls received during the past
year h fraternity men are higher
than those received by independent
men students and grades received by
sorority women averaged together
surpass marks received by indepen-
dent women, according to computa-
tions of ,Marian Williams, statisti-
cian in tie Registrar's Office.
The grades fraternity men and
sorority women average together
are also higher than the combined
averag of the independent men and
women andof all men and women.
Sorority members lead the list of
grades with an average of 79.2 per
cent, which is a little better than a
hal B, half C average, according to
Mi s Williams' figures.
The scale which has been used in
compiling the scholarship record is
A #quals 100 per cent, B ,equal 85
per cent, Cdequals 70 per cent,
equaW 50 per cent, and E equals 20
per cent.
The various grades received by the
different groups follow:
General Sororities............ 79.2
epen tdent Women Students..
Women Students*............. 78.6
Women's Dormitolries and
l gue houses. . ............78.
4e-eral- raterntiesSorrities. 77
Independent Men and Wosen*.77.0
Gleneral Fraternities.......... 76.9
All Men and Women*......... 76.8
Independent Men Students* ....76.3
Mn,Students*..............76.1
;Medical, law, and dental students
are not included in the starred
groups. Because of the lack of uni-
formity between the grading systems
in tle profesional schools and those
in the non-profesional schools of
the yiversity, it seems advisable to
conlsider medical, law, and dental
stdents as separate groups. The
comparson of these schools, either
with each ,other or with the best of
the Universitye not significant.
~All grades earned by ineligible and
dropped pledges have previously been
counted in the independent, all men,
and all women groups. For 1932-33
only the grades earned-by these stu-
dets while they were not pledged to
a fraternity are included in the in-
dependent groups. Grades earned
while they were pledges have been
omitted from both fraternity and in-
dependent averages. All grades earned
by these students have been included
in the all men and all women groups.
Grades received by the various fra-
ternities on the campus follow:
1. Pi' Kappa Phi...........82.9
2. Kappa Delta Rho.........82.6
?. Trigoj..... .............824
4. beta Beta Tau.... ....... 82.1
fir Theta Kappa fl......... 81.9
6. Phi Alpha Kappa.........1.9
7. Phi Sigma. Delta.........81.9
$. Delta Sigma Phi*...... ..81.0
9. Alpha Kappa Lambda......80.3
i. Theta C'hiu...............80.2
11. Triangle...............80.1
12, Beta sigma Psi...........$80.1
13. Sigma Pi*................80
14. Phi Simga Kappa.........79.
. Sgma h...........795
1. Tau Kappa Epsilon..... .791
17. Acaia.................789
18,, Phi Epsilon Pi..........78.8
19.Kappa -sigma........... 78.2
(Continued on Page 12)
Start Sales Drive
For'34 Yearbook
An intensive sales campaign for
the 1934 Michganensian, University
yearbook, will start today, according
to Robert Henoch, '35, sales mana-
ger. Coupon books will be sold at all
Important points on the campus for
$3.50, this price to hold until Christ-
mas. Payments will be received in
installments of $1 down at the time

of purchase of the coupons, $1 by
Nov. 15, and the remaining $1.50 by
Dec. 15.
As in former years, the price of
the 'Ensian will increasehas theecol-
lege year progresses. From Christ-
mas until the end of the first se-
mester the book will sell for $4.50.
During the second semester, until
Spring Vacation, the price will be $5,
after which it will be increased to
$5.50. In all cases the down pay-
ment and second installment will be
$1, the balance of the current price
to be made up in the third payment.
Professor and Mrs. "lcbrad hay;e
returned from Europc "he Profes
sor has made a detailed study of
housing projects.

For Freshmeti
Prices Of Rooms Will Be
Slightly Less Than Last
Year, Survey Shows
More tian 700 rooming houses,
each with from one to 15 rooms, are
available to incoming students, as
well as rooms in Fletcher Hall, Uni-
versity-owned dormitory, it was said
yesterday at the rooming bureau in
the Union.
Rooming-house prices in general
are about the same as last year, a
survey showed, with a slight de-
crease indicated in many sections of
the city.
The average price for single rooms,
for which there is a large demand
among incoming freshman students,
is about $3.50 a week. There are a
few rooms available at as low a ren-
tal as $1.50 and a few as high as
$5.

In spite of a lowered attendance
that was to be expected in view of
the continued stringent economic
situation, the 1933- Summer Session
was "very successful," Dean Edward
H. Kraus, former head of the Sum-
mer Session, said yesterday.
"The general concensus of opinion
was that the students were of an
unusually high calibre and that their
v-erelassrnen
l~aR eceeive
fle h- 1a XR ms

Dean of Students Joseph A. Burs-
ley will address members of the in-
coming freshmanclass Wednesday
night in Hill Auditorium.
Stewards Will

M etTdyDiseuss Plans
Octol er Budgets, 3 Per
Cent Sales Tax On Food
To Be Considered
An invitation has been extended
to all stewards of fraternity houses
to have luncheon at noon today at
the Union with officials of the In-
terfraternity Council for the pur-
pose of discussing common problems.
Among the subjects which will be
discussed are the making budgets for
the month of October, the three per
cent state sales tax on all food, which
may be levied on all fraternities, and
other matters of interest to stew-
ards.
Budgets will be required of all
house managers for the month of
October, under the new rulings of
the Interfraternity Council passed in
May, and, according to an announce-
ment of Bethel B. Kelley, '34, presi-
dent of the council, it will be neces-
sary for all houses to comply with
this ruling.
"Although we have permitted sev-
eral houses to 'get by' last semester
without submitting the reports which
were required, we intend to put this
thing into effect in full force this
year," he declared.
"Stewarids interested in co-opera-
tive buying should bring a list of
estimated needs of canned goods and
staples for the next two months,"
Kelley said.

Double rooms and suites are not as
numerous as single rooms, nor is
there a large demand for them.
Most of the double rooms are rented
to students who have been in the
University for a year or more, as the
majority of entering freshmen prefer
to room alone. Suites average about
$3.50 per person and double rooms
about $2.50 per person.
The general average of room fen-,
tals is just about the same as in
past years, although there may* be a
slight decrease, those in charge of
rentals said. There are more board-
ing students than in the past.
One rule which those in charge of
room rentals said should be empha-
sized is the fact that no unmarried
male student is allowed to rent a
room in an apartment house. Excep-
tions may be made to this rule in
the case of graduate students, but
no permission for such rooms would
be given to undergraduate students.
Fletcher Hall, 915 Sybil St. is
opened as a dormitory under Univer-
sity control for the first time this
year. All the rooms are single and
are priced at $2.50.
Corsages
T ablea rrangements
Potted Plants

"Health examinations are not re-
stricted to freshmen alone," Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, director of the Uni-
versity Health Service, said yester-
day.
Upperclassmen can also receive the
examination, but it is more conven-
ient for them to come to the Health
Service later in the year. Students
who have been out of school a se-
mester or more are required to be
re-examined.
Appointments for the examina-
tions, which are to continue until
Saturday noon, can be made by men
at Waterman Gymnasium and by
women at Barbour Gymnasium. In,
the examination itself the applicant
it checked by specialists in succes-
sive stations for conditions of eyes,
teeth, ears, nose, and throat; gen-
eral medicine, surgery, skin and ner-
vous diseases, and physical measure-
ments.

work was of a high grade," Dean
Kraus said in praising the "fine
spirit" of those enrolled here during
the summer.
The drop in attendance from 3,-
757 in 1932 to 3,194 this summer was
described as the average loss experi-
enced by similar institutions, while
in some instances, he said, univer-
sities reported a decrease of as much
as 40 per cent.
The general decrease in enroll-
ment was not shared by all of the
schools and colleges in the Univer-
sity. The Medical School, with an
enrollment of 252, increased 15.6 per
cent; the Law School, with 163 stu-
dents, gained .5.2 per cent; and the
College of Pharmacy, enrolling 23,
gained 15 per cent..
The total attendance of 3,194 in-
cludes that in all branches of the
University, short courses, and sum-
mer camps, but does not include 40
teachers who were enrolled for the
second annual conference of teach-
ers of international law. Of the stut-
dent body, 2,181 were men and 1,-
010 were women.
The Graduate. School, which was
attended by 1,399 students, had the
largest enrollment of any single
school. The literary college rankedI
next with x47, followed by the Edu-
ctional Conference with 275, and
the engineering college with 254.
There were 177 in the School of
Education, 94 in the Biological Sta-
tion. near Cheboygan, 84 in the
School of Music, 47 in tle Physics
Symposium, 46 in the College of Ar-
chitecture, 20 in the School of Bus-
iness Administration, and 16 in the
forestry school, it was reported.

VOL. xLTV

li,

II

Radid
Crosley-Sparton
Sales

Guaranteed Radio Service
Radios -- Washing Machines
Vacuum Cleaners
Refrigeration
615 East Williams Street
Phone 7912

11I

A Special Convocation of the University will be held on the occasioi
of the opening exercises of the Medical School at 10:00 a .m., Monday
September 25, in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Dr. George Barger, of th
University Hof Edinburgh, will deliver the address. The exercises are opel
to the public.
Freshmen: Members of Eta Sigma Phi (Classical honor society) an(
their friends invite all freshmen who have presented credits in Latin fo
admission to the University to an informal reception at the Classic
Museum in Newberry Hall (opposite Angell Hall) this evening at seven
thirty.
Sophomore Men and Women and Junior Women interested in tryin
out for the Business Staff of the Michiganensian, report to the Studer
Publications Building at once.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1933

1

Engineers and Architects Materials
Sataioiery, FointaiA Pens, Loose Leaf Books
Typewriting and Pound Papers
College Pennants - Jewelry
Leather Goods

You'll Need

_. _._.__ _ _ _..__._ r

$1.25 and $1.75

11

1111 South University Ave.

i'

Other Desk Lamps..........$4.00 to $8.00
Desk Lamp, Metal Shade......25c to 40c
Desk Lamp, Glass Shade .......80c to $1.25

i dr

.

..,._

. _

11

U

war

- . -

- . - -"

- ,.

Floor taps, sockets, plugs and other wiring devices

I

Cut Flowers of All Kinds
Give Us a Trial
ChelseahGreenhouse
113 East Washington
Telephone 2-3141

Ernsth ros. Electric Shop
210 South Fourth Avenue Ann Arbor

The Most Sensationally
Pric ed Cafa int
AnnArbor Today!
All, food ip-ortion
Served for. .
Vegetables - salads- potatoes - drinks - pies -
cakes - soups - desserts - in fact everything excepting
fish and meats which sell for only 8c to 15c a portion.
*0

77

I

WELCOME '37
TWO FIRST-d2UN FEATURES

Campus Cut Rate Drugs,
218 SOUTH STATE -"NEXT TO GOLDMAN'S
1 r

50c Toothpaste
Squibbs Iodent
Ipana
34c

$1.25
Alarm Clocks

$1.10
Axmand's Face
Powaer
79c

SPECIAL THIS WEEK

98c

IN THE HEART
of one man

IN THE
of

ARMS
another

A Paramount Picture
with
HELEN.
TWELVETREES
BRUCE CABOT
ADRIENNE AMES
WILLIAM HARRIGAN
and KEN MURRAY

r der
ea
eo E o.,
OPPENHEIM'S
A Paramunt Picture with
CLIVE BROOK
GEORGE RAPT
ALISON SKIPWORTH
HELEN VINSON

I

$1.00 Coty Face
Powder
93C
All Shades
Eversharp Pen
and Pencil Set

10
Blue Blades for
Gil lette Razor.

$1.00 Vaseline
Hair Tonic

Breaded Pork Chop -Apple Sauce
Small Sirloin Steak............
Small Tenderloin Steak ..........
Baked Virginia Ham ...........

644

«. l Oc
« .15c
...15c
..15c

39c

STATIONERY

$1.25

Camels
Luckies
Chester felds
$1.09
CARTON
2 pkgs. 23c

19C
And Up

.. --Try luncheon ot this clean Tavern Cafeteria today
and you surely will take dinner here tonight!
T HE TAVERN
Cleanliness
338 Maynard Street
Across from Branch Post Office
Mike Fingerle, Prop.

Yardley's
Shaving Bowl
$1.00

50c PREP

3 for 50c

DELIVERY AT ALL HOURS

PHONE 9392

I

11

e...c

- . , ._.

THURSDAY
"MURDERS IN
THE ZOO"
Charlie Ruggles

"COCKTAIL
HOUR"
Bebe Daniels

Ir

Michi an
A rtesi a

JESTIC
ENDS TONIGHT
"HEROES "SILK
FOR SALE" EXPRESS"
Richard Barthelmess Neil Hamilton
TOMORROW
'HER BODYGUARD'"SCARLET DAWN"
Wynne Gibson Doug Fairbanks, Jr.
Edmund Lowe Nancy Carroll

t
' :..

DINE and DANCE

cfJ(ichigan 's

@2(Cst

Sophisticated

Rendezvous

p
1~

. . .

at

Water
TF To 4-Inn T2acf^

.A.

Snapp;
Music

WHERE MICHIGAN'S SOCIALLY ACTIVE
FLOURISH IN A "COLLEGIATE AND

REFINED ATMOSPHERE"

'[JT1PlRT1-4I Iat

if

i

t

Itj I I

T j

IT "!

1 'd ct. tt

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