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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1933 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Professors State
Theories To Cure
Sleeping Students
Professors here at the university,
tired of having students sleeping in
their classes, stayed up late one night
recently and formulated 15 ways to
keep a student awake.
One professor claims that he keeps
his class awake by sitting back on his
chair on the edge of the speakers
platform. The students all stay awake
for fear they will miss seeing him fall
over backward.
Other professors think the best
method is to plant a "stooge" in the
middle of the room. He contradicts
the professor and makes some "wild"
statement. The class gets angry and
starts to back. Presto! everyone is
awake.
It is not necessary for a professor
to tell a joke every day, say the
professors. If the professor repeats
the same joke every day, the class
will become accustomed to it and will
stay awake just to laugh at it once
more.
Typical devices and techniques in-
clude discussions of controversial top-
ics - "Hitler is right concerning the
Jews," reminiscences- "Now when
I was a boy," - polemics, "apparently
io one in this class has the ingenuity
to.''
There is the professor on the cam-
pus who proudly boasts that five or
six of his students have suffered
mental aberrations in his class.
Rose Talks To Chemists
On Important New Acid
Details of the discovery and isola-
tion of a new amino acid present in
proteins were given at 4:15 p. m.
Tuesday in the Chemistry Amphi-
theatre by Dr. W. R. Rose, professor
of physiological chemistry at the Uni-
versity of Illinois.
This new amino acid, Dr. Rose said,
is very important in nutrition and is
present in large quantities in the
casein of milk. He discussed riumer-
ous processes by which the compound
was separated out from the 30 or
more other amino acids present in
proteins, and showed by means of
slides the effects which this and
other compounds have on the growth
of rats used in the experiments.
We can never expect that the des-
tinies of nations and peoples can be
disposed of by compromise or arbi-
tration. America, like Alexander, is
looking for new worlds to conquer.
-Patrick H. O'Brien.

Publication Of
Phi Beta Kappa
Receives Praise
Prof. Bennett Weaver Says
'American Scholar' Is A
Forum Of Critical Ideas
The American Scholar, a magazine
published quarterly by Phi Beta
Kappa, national scholastic honor so-
ciety, was characterized as "an ex-
cellent forum for critical ideas" by
Prof. Bennett Weaver of the English
department.
"Addressing itself to the general
intelligence of the American people,
The American Scholar invites Uni-
versity people to think upon the
basic problems of life," Professor
Weaver said.
This magazine is now in its second
year of existence. It contains prose
material on numerous and varied
subjects including philosophy, litera-
ture, economics, journalism, educa-
tion, politics, science, industry, art,
music, religion, and others as well
as some poetry.
Among the contributors to the
numbers of the past year are two,
members of the University faculty. In
the January issue, Prof. DeWitt H.
Parker of the philosophy department
wrote an article entitled "The Phil-
osopher-Saint Spinoza." "Salvaging
Our Literature" is the title of a con-
tribution by Prof. Howard Mumford
Jones of the English department ap-
pearing in the May issue.
Such well known writers as Mary
R. Beard, John Livingston Lowes,
William Rose Benet, John Tasker
Howard, and David Lawrence have
also contributed to this year's num-
bers.

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
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l on basis of five average words to
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10% discount if paid within ten days
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Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month..-....-............8
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The above rates are per reading line,
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letters. Add 6c per line to above for
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capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
TAXICABS$
TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. 1x
LOST
LOST: A set of propellor drawings.
Information leading to its recovery
would be greatly appreciated. Chas.
R. Burgess Phone 7317. 181
LOST: A gold cameo pendant with
long chain. Finder call 2-2347. Re-
ward. 183
WILL the person who by mistake
removed a brownrhat bearing in-
itials W. G. S. from the League
G~rill Wednesday night please call
Grafton Sharp at phone 2-1214 or
2-3297. 182

FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE, warm room with pri-
vate bath. First floor of home.
Comfortable for 1 or 2 men. Phone
3768. 175
NOTICE
NOTICE - Eleanor's. Dressmaking
Shop. 302 S. State St. upstairs.
Coats, suits and dresses made and
remodeled. Prices reasonable. 179
BUY NEW AND USED CARS FROM
FINANCE CO. 311 W. Huron 22001.
1933, 1932, 1931, 1930 models. 12x
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates.
2x
LIRETTE'S shampoo and finger wave
75c every day. Dial 3083. 103
LAUNDRY
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
CallE or andrdeliver. 23478, 5594.
611 Ek Hoover. 9x
WE DO your laundry work for one-
half the usual price. Phone 2-3739.
8x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
WANTED
WANTED : Passengers to North-
westernDgame. 7-passenger car. Can
leave Friday or Saturday. Call
Harned, 821 E. University. Phone
2-23359. Evenings 8754. 180
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits ana overcoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5, and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306, Chicago Buyer. 5x
READ THE DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADS

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MATINEE
SATURDAY
25c 55c
83c

MAJESTIC
ALL THIS WEEK

Final Festival Week. The Original STAGE Play
The King of Mystery Melodramas!

criminal
at

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large"

The Case of the frightened lady! | OF CAPABLE ARTISTS
EDGAR WALLACE'S
Inscrutable, Fascinating, Suspense-full, Play *
Piscatorially
Speaking ...
the seafood served at the Tavern
is truly high hat ... and justly...
because it has so recently left
the upper 400 seafood society at

": MAJESTIC

9,#

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Boston to grace mike

fingerle's

V

counter for your benefit . . .
* Specials for Today *

Fried Deep Sea Scallops
Fried Fillet of Sole . .

. .
. .

15c
.12C
. 14c

A-

Baked Fillet of Flounder.

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--No Wonder THE TAVERN
A A : r Tc : , 1 A :,r A I. l m AD,41..1- , rs

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