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November 23, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, 1933

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MTCTTTE~AN DATT.V

I

Volverines Study Strategy; Polish Offense For Northwec

ste

Skull Session Is
Feature Of Next
To Last Practice
Defense Against Purple,
Rehearsal Of New Plays
Comprise Outdoor Drill
Team Leaves Friday
Savage, Tessmer Will Be
In Shape To Participate
In Northwestern Fracas
A long skull practice featured the
next to the last football workout of
the season held yesterday at Yost
Field House. With comparatively
good weather greeting the WMolverines
for the first time in weeks, Coach
Harry Kipke turned his back on Ferry
Field and spent the greater part of
the session talking over new plays on
top of the locker rooms in the Field
House.
After sending his men through a
short warm-up consisting mostly of
running down under punts, Kipke left
newspapermen t w i d d 1 i n g their
thumbs for nearly an hour before he
returned from skull practice with his
charges.,
The remainder of the afternoon
was confined to polishing up Mich-
igan's new attack, and drilling on de-
fense against Northwestern plays.
Savage, Tessmer Back
The announcement that Estil Tess-
mer and Carl Savage will be available
for the last game against the Wild-
cats has considerably cheered up the
Wolverine outfit.
Savage, rated high as a guard, has
been out since the Illinois game, in
which he fractured a foot bone.
Tessmer, who suffered a fractured
collar bone in the Cornell game, has
been in light workouts for the last
two weeks and may see action in his
and Michigan's last game Saturday.
With Savage back in the lineup,
Kipke hopes to get his much-vaunted,
but so far ineffective, aerial attack
clicking. With Savage at guard, the
forward wall may hold longer and al-
low Renner to complete his throws.
Unbeaten Teams
Will Play Easier
Games Saturday
Out of the several hundred cham-
pionship football elevens that took to
the nation's gridirons late in Sep-
tember, but three can still be classed
as champions. They are unbeaten
and untied Army, Princeton, and
Duke.
Each of these top-raters has two
games remaining on its schedule, and
any one of them may prove to be its
Nemesis. This week Army meets its
brother service team, Navy, at Frank-
lin Field, Philadelphia; Princeton
takes on Rutgers in the Lion's lair; '
and Duke meets North Carolina on
its home grounds.
May Not Be Pushovers
Although these three games look to
be pushovers for the leaders, any one
of the underdogs may muster enough
spirit to upset the dope. Navy has a4
good running attack in Fred Borries
and a fine punter in Chung Hoon,1
both of which whipped Notre Dame
decisively.
Rutgers is not nearly so strong and
the Tigers should not be bothered byR
their passing attack that has beaten
such teams at Lehigh, Lafayette, and
Providence. But still they're not a

set-up by any stretch of the imagina-
tion.
The Blue Devils of Duke have com-
paratively little to fear from North
Carolina State, the latter counting
decisive defeats by Vanderbilt and
Georgia Tech among the season's
memories.
Test Next Week
But next week comes the acid test
for these three leaders. Army travels
to South Bend to encounter an in-
spired Notre Dame team that may or
may not down Southern California.
The Cadets, however, are traditional
rivals of the Irish and are sure to
meet some tough opposition in their
final game.
Princeton will enter the Yale bowl
Dec. 2 with the jinx of the stadium
hanging over it as it has over the
other members of the Eastern divi-
sion. Wallace Wade will lead his un-
beaten Duke eleven againstha deter-
mined Georgia Tech outfit that would
like nothing better than to trip the
title-bound Devils.
t

K}-

Stellar Guard To Face Wildcats

Maize And Blue
Pucksters Open
Season Dec. 8
Team To Get First Test
Against Chatham Or Am-
herstburg
The Michigan hockey t e a m,
coached by Eddie Lowrey, will open
the 1933-34 season against a team se-
lected from the Michigan-Ontario
League on December 8 at the Coli-
seum. Either Chatham or Amherst-
burg will be the opponent of the Wol-
verines in this year's opener.
Although the schedule has not yet
been completed, Colgate University of
Ithaca, N. Y. will be matched against
the icers on December 13 at the
Coliseum, Coach Lowrey announced
yesterday.
Weakened by the graduation of
Co-captains Reed and Crossman of
last year's squad, Lowrey is faced
with the difficulty of developing a
scoring punch to take the place of
the Crossman-Reed combination. A
squad of more than 20 has been
working out nightly this week under
the direction of the Michigan men-
tor.
Seven Veterans
The team this year will be built
around seven regulars from last year's
squad comprising Capt. George Da-
vid, Johnny Sherf, Johnny Jewell,
Ted Chapman, Avon Artz, Tom Stew-
art and Walter Courtis. The soph-
omores who have shown the most
ability in practice this week are Law-
rence David, Bill Onderdonk, Charles
Tarbor and Gilbert McEachern. With
the exception of Chapman, who will
not join the hockey squad until the
end of the football season, all have
been practicing this week.
The squad promises to have lots of
speed but at present lacks the neces-
sary balance. All of the players show
a tendency to do too much useless
skating, a fault which will have to
be corrected before the face-off of
the opening match.
Fine Wings
In Capt. David and Sherf, Lowrey
has two of the finest wings in am-
ateur hockey. Both are excellent stick
handlers, making it difficult for op-
ponents to gain control of the puck
on dashes down the ice. Lowrey char-
acterizes Sherf as the fastest man
that the Wolverines have had.
For the center position, Lowrey
has three offensive stars to team up
with the wings in Artz, Onderdonk
and Lawrence David. The form dis-
played by Artz this week is consider-
ably gratifying to the Wolverine
coach, but he needs more fire to carry
him to the point where he will make
a successful play-making center man,
which is necessary in the develop-
ment of a scoring attack.
Return After Football
When the football season ends,
Lowrey will have three capable de-
fense men in Chapman, Stewart, and
Courtis. Don McCollum, defensive
star for the past two seasons, will be
ineligible the first semester but is
expected to be available for the latter
part of the schedule. Chapman and
McCollum, teamed on defense, make
one of the strongest defensive units
in intercollegiate hockey.
The sophomores available this year
are especially strong, McEachern at
right wing showing the most promise.
Among the sextets which the Wol-
verines will meet this year are Min-
nesota, Wisconsin, Marquette, and
Michigan College of Mines. Lowrey
also expects to schedule Queens of
Kingston, Ont., and other Western
Ontario squads that are members of
the Senior Intercollegiate league.

Oarl Savage, star Michigan guard who has been on the inactive
list since the Illinois game because of a severe foot injury, will return
to the lineup Saturday when the Wolverines meet Northwestern at
Evanston. It is believed that Savage's return will bolster the Michigan
line sufficiently so that Renner will have ample time to get his passes
away successfully, which has not been the case of late.

PLAY

& BY-PLAY

I -By AL NEWMAN I
LETTERS OF A GANGSTER IN COLLEGE to his lady-friend in the
Big, Wicked City:
Dear Mabel:
I spend most of this week in the local jug which is a dump which
would be described by a professor as noisome & dank (which means a
pretty lousy sort of joint, Mabel).
I get there for placing the slug on several of the local bulls, who come
down the aisle last Saturday to remove a harmless English gent named
Percy Frostbottom who I meet at the game and who is doing nothing
worse than standing up on the bench and hollering "I say, jolly well ruin
the blightahs" & other phrases with which the English express uncontrol-
able enthusiasm.
Of course this Percy is deeply grateful and he finally gets me out of the
coop and here I am again. This week the Michigans are playing the North-
westerns which are known as the Vile Cats & I will be over ii the Big
Burg to see you and take you to see the game. This guy Frostbottom is:
coming with me and I want you to get a date for him. You know, some
doll with considerable culture & refinement, as Percy is very, very refined,
indeed.
We are all somewhat disappointed Saturday when the Go Furs tie the
Michigans, but as far as I can make out what with the rough & tough
football teams in the Huge Double-Five (ha, ha, the Big Ten, Mabel), it
is as hard for any team to go through the season without at least a tie
as it is to draw an inside card to a straight flush. Which, if you know your
games of chance, Mabel, is strickly the Maguire.-
I understand that all the Michigans have to do Saturday to win the
title is to tie the Vile Cats. According to the things which I read from other
places there is hardly a top-notch player on either side who should not
be taking it easy in some sanitarium. They are going to call it the battle
of the cripples and I hear that they are hiring a special crew of men to
clear the broken crutches & splints off the field at the half.
Sincerely,
MIKE.

E

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