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September 26, 1933 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEPT. a6, 1933 THE MICHIGAN DAILY P
~..-rooms. Freshmen required to live in of the engineeringi
apprvedhouss. owad.B.-'Lewis,h
Aug.1 1- A nn A rbor stores voted Ho ga che m str
fuller co-operation with the NRA made directors of t
and agreed to remain open Saturday
- - - - ..._.. -- - - - - - -sion and of the pl

iGE
coll
cad
dep
he
har

lege and Prof.
i of the physi-
artment, were
Summer Ses-
rmacy College,

Effinger Death,
Facul ty Cuts
Are Important
(Continued from Page 1)
$4,000 to $7,500, 15 per cent cut; any
increment above $7,500, 20 per cent
cut.
In all, four professors, four associ-
ate professors, seven assistant pro-
fessors, and 45 instructors and six
others were eliminated from the Uni-
versity payroll.
The difference between the ac-
cepted budget of $5,088,831 and the
mill-tax appropriation of $3,200,000
which the University will receive
from the State will be made up
through tuition and other sources,
President Ruthven said.
Comstock Vetoes
4. Gov. William A. Comstock's ve-
to July 11 of the University appro-
priation bill, on the grounds that
since 'the old 'mill tax clause had not
been 'repealed in the bill the Uni-
versity would receive a double ap-
propriation. But, in deference to
the oft and loudly expressed wish
of the State Legislature, the Gover-
nor said he wotld instruct the State
Administrative Board to release to
the University only $3,200,000 - a
sum $500,000 less than the figure
President Ruthven said was the low-
est on which the University could
maintain its present rank as one of
the country's ,foremost educational
plants.
5. The death July 5 of Paul Buck-
ley, '04L. Mr. Buckley, who had
been general manager of the Union
since 1926, succunbed to a two
weeks' illness following an abdominal
operation. It was generally con-
ceded that the peak of his career had

by no means been reached, for short-
ly before his death he had been made
general purchasing manager for the
University dormitories (excluding
Martha Cook and the Lawyers Club).
He was 51 years old.
6. The death of Thomas M.
"Father" Iden, July 20, at the age
of 77. Leader of the Upper Room
Bible Class which met each Saturday
at 7 p. in., he had been spiritual
adviser to more than 9,000 Michigan
students during his 20 year residence
here. He had been ill 10 months
prior to his death.
7. The death July 1 of Police
Chief Thomas M. O'Brien at his
home of an apoplectic stroke. Effi-
cient head of the police force here
for 16 years, he was succeeded by
Acting Chief Lewis W. Fohey, a for-
mer sergeant.
** * *
Lesser events of the summer, listed
chronologically, follow:
June 9 -President Ruthven cre-
ated an advisory committee to the
President composed of Prof. H. A.
Sanders, chairman of the depart-
ment of speech and general linguis-
tics, chairman; Prof. L. W. Keeler
of the education school, Prof. C. O.
Wisler of the engineering college,
and H. N. Dorr of the political sci-
ence department. The committee
was created to serve in an advisory
capacity on vital matters of admin-
istration.
June 15-Horace H. Rackham,
Detroit multimillionaire philanthro-
pist, was revealed as the anonymous
donor of $500,000 to the University
over a 10 year period.
A 1 u m n i began registration for
their formal reunions.
Dr. Hanes Named
June 16 - A temporary committee
to administer the affairs of the lit-
erary college was announced. It was
composed of Prof. Edward H. Kraus
of the pharmacy college, chairman;

Prof. Joseph R. Hayden of the politi-
cal science department, Prof. Moses
Gomberg of , the chemistry depart-
ment, Prof. Louis C. Karpinski of the
mathematics department, and Prof.
DeWitt H. Parker of the philosophy
'department.
Dr. Harley Hanes was chosen to
head the newly established cancer
clinic at University Hospital.
June 17--Don H. Hastings of De-
troit was re-elected president of the
General Alumni Association.
June 19 - Christian Gauss, dean
of the college of Princeton' Universi-
ty, addressed 1,993 graduates at the
University commencement exercises
at Ferry Field. More than 15,000
attended.
June 21- Judge George W. Sam-
ple of Circuit Court upheld the City
Council in refusing to grant Ralph
T. and Winifred Monk, proprietors
of a State Street cafe, a license to
sell 3.2 beer and wine in their es-
tablishment. His grounds: that the
city charter provision prohibiting the
sale of malt, vinous, spiritous, and
other liquors east of Division Street
has never been repealed.
June 22 - Horace H. Rackham's
will was filed for probate in Detroit.
He left '$100,000 to aid needy Uni-
versity students through loans or
outright gifts.
June 27 - President Ruthven

opened departmental hearings in
order to find route to cope with bud-
get slash.
June 29 - Prof. Benjamin D. Mer-
rit of the Greek and Latin depart-
ment and Prof. A. F. Lindblad of
the engineering college resigned
from the faculty.
July 1 -State 3 per cent retail
sales tax put in force.
July 4 - University enrollment for
year 1932-33 found to have been 13.-
257, a 10.5 per cent decrease Proin
the previous school year.
July 7 -Lewis W. Fohey made
permanent chief of-police.
July 24 - The Ann Arbor Trans-
portation Co.'s five new yellow and
blue buses began operation. Before
this date there had been no bus serv-
ice since the contract of the Eastern
Michigan Motorbus Co. expired June
16.
July 25- School 'of Education
conference :n public education re-
adjustments opened.
Gets Dem Post
July 28--President Roose velt
named Horatio J. Abbott, Ann Ar-
bor Democratic chief, collector of
internal revenue for Michigan.
Aug. 2 -- Ann Arbor merchants be-
gan to fall in line with the NRA.
Aug. 9 -Dean James B. Edmon-

son of the education school was
named gecralissimo of the Ann Ar-
bor NRA forces.
Aug. 10 It was announced that
President Ruthven's new offices will
be on the west side of the main floor
of Angell Hall instead of in Room
Univcrsiy Hall, as formerly. The
journalism and sociology depart-
ment- wil move into the old Law
Building: when the law offices, li-
brari's. and materials have been
transferred to Huchins Hall.
Aug. 14-,-Mortimer E. Cooley, for-
mer dean of the engineering college,
vas appointed public works engineer
for Michigan.
Aug. 15-Householders were sent
special listing blanks for approval of

night.
Aug. 17-- Hundreds march in Ann
Arbor's NRA parade.
Aug. 20-More than 3,000 left the
Summer Session for home.
Aug. 22- Washtenaw County re-
ceived $190,095 from the Federal
government for roads.
Miss Ellen B. Stevenson, assistant
to the dean of women, was made fi-
nancial adviser to Michigan dormi-
tories with the exception of Martha
Cook and the Lawyers' Club. Suc-
cessor to Paul Buckley, former man-
ager of the Union, not named.
Aug. 26- Cal Markham, member
of the University golf team, swamped
Ben Morris of Ann Arbor, 8 and 7,
in the finals of the City Golf Tour-
nament.
Aug. 31-Prof. Lewis A. Hopkins

respectively.
Finance committee of the State
Administrative board reported that
the University will receive its $3,-
200,000 in monthly installments of
one-twelfth, plus one-twelfth of
other money owed the University by
the State. About $445,000 will be
f o r t h c o m i n g automatically each
month in this manner.
Sept. 6 - University officials to ask
new campus administration building
and a new observatory on the Huron
River near Dexter of the Federal
government as the State prepares to
ask $25,000,000 of Washington for
building purposes.
Sept. 12 -Prof. E. A. Walter of
the English department elected to
board of education in light vote.

Believe It orNot.

by (pL fr I

3

HEREI 5 ONE BRAND OF
FOUNTAIN PEN-NOTHICKER OR
LONGER THAN OTHER PENS
Wet- MADE 50 IT
H01/05 102% MORE /NA

47(J/, d7"
.. xa 5

~ne t~4oa--

P

'41

PHis SAME BRAND OF FOUNTAIN PEN
HAS A POINT THAT WRITES TWO WAYS-
In Normal Position it Wrtes
F/NE or MEDIUM or BROAD
Torned Over it Writes
F/NE or EXTRA FINE HAIR LINE

0

Calling Your Attention to
Comfort Aids for the
Study Room
Sponge Rubber Cushions. ........$1.00
(Others to $5)
Waste Baskets ................25c up
Book Ends.............25c pair
Desk Pads.......................39c up
Canvas Binder 50c
11x 81/2 - 3-ring
500 Sheets Typewriting Paper. .. 50c
Sheets 8% x 11

1ELD To TIHE LiGHT
THE TRANSPARENT R/NGS
SHOW THE INK WITHIN-
SHOW WHEN To REF/L
This En&s Ronnn Dry
at SOmetr
Crit ic
oment

~A4RL IS LAMINATED-
QUILT UP RINGi UPON RING~ OF
5HIMMEf INC PEAFRL AN" J.ET,-OP
PEARL AND TPANSPARENT ;AMBER~,
-Which ;Looks Like Pearl bnAJet
when 511 with Ihk.

;
. ,_..

i I

.STYL ED FOR~ THE SMARTEST' PEOPLE

Business Has Character
It is continued good service that establishes a business
institution's character. * The Farmers and Mechan-
ics Bank points with pride to its fifty years of reliable
service to the people of Ann Arbor and the students
of the University.
FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
Member.Federal Reserve System
Main at Huron State at the Arcade

V!

1 EVERSHARP PENCIL
With Box Leads and Erasers. 39c

I

The Mayer-Schairer Co.
Stationers, Printers, Binders, Office Outfitters

l
3
1

"Parker's Utterly New Vau "atic Filler
REVOLUTIONIZES F ~ ENS
The Sacless, Ultra -Snart, Laminated Pearl' Beutythat holds sa'/s
102% more ink. Tells you When to refill,"'hence ends running dry.
the double quantity--try writing two
Geo. S. Parker now announces a increase in size. Go right now and ways with this one Reversible Point.
marvelous new Pen development see this new-day writer. See how it All good pen counters are demonstrat-
in the Parker Vacumatic Filler - a fills by vacuum-see the ink within ing. The Parker PenCo., Janesville;Wis.
development that forever ends the through the clear-vision rings-see
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at some critical moment. MAKES A PEN A SIF-CLENER-
University of Wisconsin, and de- a.r. I rC FAT DISSOLVES SEDIMENT.
veloped by Parker,the Vacumatic AC7AVTIC FIE breo1!'aser b
Filler is the first sacless pen cton-,AvaeonPp bt
taining no piston pump or valves- L e PMore 5/o0ly on a Pen Point.
nthing o rnde r i uselelater. Laminated Pearl or Plain Jet Pencil tAR-EtsNe-
notin t rede i usles * Mated, $3.50; Jet or Plain Transparent PARXEAR QUilYgS+
And it holds 102% more inik With no0Pen, $5; Pencil, $2.50.

112 South Main Street

Phone 4515

v

I

_,__ -,..

0

/

I

ALWAYS

::

the finest tobaccos

2

ALWAYS

t~einst wor~as

t

sjopright, 1933, The ,Amercan Toba A~

w. -

Why do we say "Always Luckies Please"?
Well, one reasoni is that every Lucky is
made of choice, ripe tobaccos-the Cream

Ca
ove
scie

reful examination and inspection by
r 60 precision instruments and 17 alert
ntists guarantee unfailing uniformity.

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