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November 11, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IA

TH-MCIG N )1I

.C.A.Meeting
Be Held Here

Iowa Pickets Use Railroad Ties To Blockade Roads

v. 24,

25,

261

jor Colleges Will Be
wresented At Michigan
mvention
>ect 100 Guests

of. Harry F. Ward Will
ive Lecture Series In
ionnection With Parley
elegates from the nine larger col-
s in Michigan, numbering 100,
expected to attend the combined
rention of the State Student
ng Men's Christian Association
the three-day lecture series on
;ion by Harry F. Ward, professor
'hristian Ethics at Union Theo-
al Seminary, New York, which
be held here Nov. 24, 25, and 26.
general theme of .the lectures will
Religion and Social Change."
ofessor Ward will be honored at
nquet to be held at the Presby-.
n. Church Friday, Nov. 24. His
main lecture of four will be de-
ed at 8 p. m. Friday in the Pres-
rian Church auditorium. He will
'ene with the Council of Religion
the cabinets of the various stu-
s guilds at 10 a. m. Saturday to
iss local religious problems.
' noon Saturday the convention
hie Student Young Men's Chris-
Association will be formally
ed with a luncheon at Lane Hall.
:30 p. m. Professor Ward will
er his second main address in
Hall Auditorium.
a part of the regular Freshman
id Table discussion periods held
9:30 a. m. every Sunday in
League, Professor Ward will
er the third of his principal ad-
es. Following this will be a dis-
on hour with Professor Ward
ng. The final meeting will be
at 8 p. m. Sunday in Hill Audi-
cording to reports, Professor
I is a learned and fascinating
ogian. Although diminutive, he
sses a dynamic personality,
h, according to Sherwood A.
ner, president of the S.C.A.
not fail to impress his audi-

Guthe To Talkl
On Archeology
Next Thursday
Anthropologist Will Speak
In Second Of University
Faculty Lecture Series
The second in the series of Uni-
versity lectures, to be delivered by
Dr. Carl E. Guthe, director of the
Museum of Anthropology, Nov. 16 in
Natural Science Auditorium, will be
on the subject of "North American
Archeology."
These lectures are designed to
acquaint the students with some of
the outstanding personalities on cam-
pus and-to give them information in
certain fields of knowledge. The sub-
ject which Dr. Guthe has chosen is
one on which he is an acknowledged
authority.
Archaeological research in North
America, especially in the south-
western portion of the United States,
has done much to clarify, through
the study of the Pueblo Indian civili-
zation, the transition between hunt-'
ing and agricultural stages, Dr. Guthe
said yesterday.
Dr. Guthe will trace the history of
archaeology in North America with
special stress on the antiquity of man
on this continent, his history, and
contributions. He will tell of the
technique of the science and will out-
line some of the recent developments.
The Yale University library soon
is to receive from Gabriel Wells a
manuscript of a sermon believed to
have been written by Samuel John-
son.

Nazi Visits Here

Lutheran Students
Three Day Ohio
Region Meeting

Open
Valley

-Associated Press Photo
Using railroad ties, farm pickets near Sioux City, Ia., placed a blockade around the city to prevent
marketing of farm commodities. This group of pickets is shown ready for action against market-bound
trucks.

Initial Session
Of Conference
Convenes Here

-Associated Press Photo
Capt. George Schmitt, emissary of
Germany's Steel Helmet federation,
has come to the United States to
make a coast-to-coast tour to ex-
plain Nazi-ism to German-Amer-
icans.
MEDICAL SOPHOMORES NAMED
The following committee appoint-
ments for the sophomore medical
class were announced recently by
Harvard J. Van Beloif, president.
On the executive committee are
James R. Shaw, chairman, Perry Mc-
Neal and Robert J. Bannow. Virgil
D. Shepard is chairman of the fi-
nance committee, which includes Ann
B. Bosma and Morton Helper. The
social committee chairman is Oscar
U. Shapiro assisted by Edward H.
Lass and Edward G. Seybald.

Delegates to the Ohio Valley Re-
gional Conference of Lutheran Stu-
dents of America convened last night
in Ann Arbor for the opening of the
three day session at the Parish Hall
of the Zion Evangelical Lutheran
church. Following dinner In the hall
they were officially welcomed to the
conference by Ira M. Smith, Uni-
versity registrar.
The Rev. Gerard Busch, of To-
ledo, O., was the main speaker of
last night's program, making an ad-
dress on "Wisdom." At 9:30 a. m.
today the second session of the con-
ference will be held at the Parish
Hall, with the Rev. Rudolph Schulz,
of Toledo, O., scheduled to speak on
"Stature." Following him will be the
Rev. Harold Yocum, of Lindsey, O.,
who will speak on "Favor." All
speeches of the conference will be
based on the Biblical verse "And
He grew in favor both with God and
man."
The conference includes delegates
from Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsyl-
vania.
Public opinion is a collective psy-
chosis, but instead of being aroused
or influenced by emotional motives,
it is a conscious one, built up freely
and founded upon facts. - Jules
Sauerwein, French editor.

Hazards To Health In Student'
Consumption Of Liquor Shown

By DAVID G. MAC DONALD
With relaxation of Prohibition en-
forcement to take place in the im-
mediate future, the hope has been
expressed by Health Service officials
that from the health standpoint, stu-
dents will exercise self-control in
their use of alcoholic beverages.
It is a physiological fact that in
the consumption of alcohol its ab-
sorption and effect are more rapid
and more marked if the same amount
is taken in smaller bulk, they state.
Consequently, a great deal of beer,
sufficient in amount to contain one
ounce of alcohol, would be absorbed
less rapidly and have a less potent
effect than would two ources of
whiskey, which approximates 50 per
cent, or one ounce of straight al-
cohol.

other factor contingent with drink-
ing. Alcohol dilates the blood vessels
on the surface of the skin, and the
accompanying loss of heat leaves the
subject more susceptible to colds with
greater chances for developing pneu-
monia, for instance.
Quite a list of other injuries might
be anticipated for the chronic drunk.
Certain changes, under these circum-
stances, could be anticipated in his
personality, such as lack of honor
and honesty, less attention to per-
sonal appearance, and, in general,
less dependability. Changes might
also develop in his body organs and
tissues, such as the nerves, brain,
blood vessels, and liver. Chronic
drunkenness also would result in the
sacrificing of the welfare of the sub-
ject's children, should he subsequent-
ly become a parent.

Alumni Plan Radio
Program Nov. 16
Preliminary plans for University of
Michigan Night on radio station
WJR, Detroit, have already been for-
mulated, and the half-hour broad-
cast has been set for 10:30 p. m.,
Thursday, Nov. 16, immediately
following the regular University pro-
gram.
This feature is being made possi-
ble through the co-operation of stu-
dio officials with the University of
Michigan Club of Detroit, represented
by a committee headed by James M.
O'Day, '09E, a former director of the
Alumni Association.
According to an announcement re-
ceived here, the list of speakers will
include Fielding H. Yost, director of
Intercollegiate Ath1etics, Harry
Kipke, head football coach, Regent
James O. Murfin, J. Fred Lawton,
'12, Fred C. Matthei, president of the
University of Michigan Club of De-
troit, and Douglas Roby, former Var-
sity football player.

THE WORKS OF
I EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY

FATAL INTERVIEW
THE BUCK IN THE SNOW
A FEW FIGS FROM THISTLES
THE HARP WEAVERS
RENASCENCE

SECOND APRIL
ARIA DA CAPO
THE KING'S HENCHMAN
THE LAMP AND THE BELL
THREE PLAYS

SELECTED POEMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

STATE STREET

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

e is a devoted believer in the free-
. of speech and is recognized as a
npion of labor. During the past
t months he has travelled in Rus-
naking observation and since his
rn has written a book entitled
Place of Profit" which deals ex-
ively with the socio-economic ex-
nents of the Russian plan.'
o Give Tests
)n Dec. 6 For
M1edical School
dergraduate students who plan
iter the Medical School in 1934
be given an opportunity to take
rgquired medical aptitude tests
red for admission to that unit
)ec. 6 it was announced yester-
by Mrs. Charlotte S. Horner, Re-
h Assistant of the Department
iucational Investigations.
ese tests, which were designed
ie American Medical Association"
first instituted in 1930, will be
i at that time in more than 500
ges and universities in the coun-
['he Association, after determin-
hiat such tests had a better prog-
c value than any other criteria
evised, was responsible for their
rsal adoption.
idents may register for the tests
ay time from Nov. 13 to 25, in
1 4, University Hall. The fee
red is $1.00, payable at the time
gistration. The University de-
nent which administers the tests
nothing to do with the grading,
apers all being sent to a nation-
nter for correction, it was ex-'
ed by Mrs. Horner.

It is not anticipated that stud
will be indiscriminate in their
of liquor with repeal, having si
their first 'enthusiasm on the re
of beer, but certain possible inju
to health from drinking should
kept in mind.

ents
use
pent
turn
uries
i be

MA I N STREET

Accidental injuries resulting from
inebriation are primary hazards. Ex-
amples to be avoided are falling,
careless use of automobiles, and
fighting. It is difficult, of course, to
exercise due caution in an inebriated
state. There are also injuries and
troubles that can come from in-
creased sexual behavior under the
influence of alcohol such as the so-
cial disaster of pregnancy and the
possibility of contracting venereal
disease.

Acute delirium or occasionally
acute delirious processes approaching
temporary insanity can result from
acute alcoholism. The production of
hallucinations would probably result
from prolonged drinking. It is this
state of "delirium tremens" which
causes the "toper" to imagine such
sights ,aspink elephants or snakes
in his boots.
Lowered body resistance is an-

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"Because Chesterfields are milder, and better.
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I Iihe that word
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