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November 03, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

dAI9N
ed 1890

DAILY

I'll vw

A Washington
BYSTANDER

Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars definitely
recommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior;
no stars, stay away from it.

Il

.-

-
F 1--
a sN ... ar.N. ~,.,
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion a'- the Big Ten News Service.,
*sgociated Uoc iut' rtz
19933(NATIONAF _ VaRAGv 3934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as'
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mnail $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 21214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Bayston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFFt
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR..........THOMAS K. CONNELLANt
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF,
CITY EDITOR....................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George+
Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,1
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS BarbararBates, Eleanor Blum,t
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney1
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,l
Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald, Joel P. New-
man, Kenneth Parker, George I. Quimby, William R.
Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B.
Smith, Jr., Arthur M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Han.mer,]
Florence Harper, Marie Heid, Eleanor J'ohnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER .............BERNARD E. SCHNACKEt
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.............. Y
.................CATARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.I
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-1
Igor, Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,1
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, David Winkworth.1
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie. Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kinter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: E. JEROME PETTIT t
Warden Gray's
Announcemnent . . .
P ERSONS who dislike seeing con-,
victed criminals marching behind
the American Flag and applauded by impression-]
able school children welcome Warden Peter Gray's
announcement that his band is to take a vacation.
The warden's decision follows the get-a-way
in Detroit of one of his men. Public resentment,
which had already been rumbling, burst into a
roar. The warden has taken the hint,
Generosity should be accorded the person who1
slips. Every effort should be made to help him
on the road back -every effort, that is, that doest
not tend to make for more errors on the part of
other people. The effect, particularly on young-
sters, of the lionization of men who have made
mistakes can only be counted as an influence int
the wrong direction.
The Case Of
LieUt. Murrell.. .
T HE attention of many people will
be directed in a few days to the
trial of Lieut. John Murrell, former West Point1
football star, on a charge of rape in Texas. If
convicted, Murrell faces death in the electric1
chair.
This editorial is no brief for Lieutenant Mur-1
rell. We do not believe he should be extended
legal favoritism because of his fame. We do hope
that the attention which will attend the case be-+
cause of the fame of the principal will do a
great amount of good in leading to a nationwide
protest against the severity of the Southern laws

based upon a false sense of chivalry.
That a man's life should be taken from him
on this charge we believe to be one of the worst
travesties of justice remaining in the American
legal system. In the first place, the nature of
the offense is not, in itself, capital. If capital
punishment must remain as a penalty, it should
not be invoked for anything less than murder.
Secondly, it is very difficult to ascertain guilt
in the matter. The threat of death penalty for
rape encourages blackmail to an unlimited extent,
A man may become the victim of a woman's re-
venge. Too, when popular prejudice has been
awakened against a man or a group or race, it is
usually possible to find a girl who will risk her
repltation, if she has any, to bring "justice"
down upon the head of a victim on this basis.
The sex racket is the oldest known to woman.
The South should come down to earth. The
"honor" of its women is no more endangered than
that of the women of any other section. Death
for rape is a vestige of medieaval barbarism and,
with l1vn-hin r nhnld he winedo nut

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3, - In the light of subse-
quent events, President Roosevelt's "we-are-
on-the-right-track" summary of recovery progress
takes on a different meaning. He might have
paraphrased Grant to say "we will fight it out on
this line if it takes all winter," and all spring and
summer and so on, too, for that matter.
The thought is prompted by the caution with
which the new home gold market machinery was
given its first try out. Public interest - and con-
fusion - centered so much in that administration
recovery novelty that other aspects of the presi-
dential review of the whole recovery situation were
more or less lost sight of.
EVERYBODY talked gold. A surprisingly large
number of real or alleged economic author-
ities honestly confessed they did not know what
it was all abou t. The White House, either blandly
silent or tallatively uncommunicative, seemed
bent on keeping them guessing as to its ultimate
monetary policy beyond the fact that the Presi-
dent is moving and has been moving ever since
March 4 toward a managed currency.
BY and large, with excitement over the new gold
price-fixing experiment abating, the Presi-
dent's report of eight months' progress in the re-
covery drive was highly encouraging to many; his
warning that it might take one, two or even three
years to go the rest of the way highly significant.
H i s "we-are-on-the-,right-track" conclusion
sounded an advance notice of defeat for senators
or house members planning new recovery legisla-
tive projects of their own.
They will have to be able to beat a veto to
change the course of events. There is as yet no
sign of that. With the season less than three
months away, Mr. Rossevelt looms as still the
master.
NAVY day gave the second President Roosevelt
an opportunity to pay his respects to the first
President Roosevelt. It was, in fact, a Roosevelt
family affair all the way 'round.
A President Roosevelt (Franklin D., democrat)
wrote to an acting Naval Secretary Roosevelt
(Henry L., democrat) to tell him that it was "par-
ticularly fitting" that the birth anniversary of
President Roosevelt (Theodore, republican) should
be used to commemorate jointly "that great
American President" and the navy.
Yet suppose Navy day had been established dur-
ing the 1913-21 period, or this year. Probably
March 18 would hav.e been chosen instead of Octo-
ber 27. The former is the birth date of Grover
Cleveland, democrat and father of the modern
navy.
ROF. A. A. BERLE says the Roosevelt profes-
sorial brain trust "ended its activties on or
about March 15. As a member, he has authority
to speak; yet his fellow professors, still numerous
and active in Washington, may not agree.
Editorial Comment
OHIO STATE
LEARNS FROM MICHIGAN
Editor's Note - The following was printed in a
recent issue of the The Ohio State Lantern, in the
To The Editor column.
To The Editor:
I quote from a Lantern editorial of October 24:
"The rally held Thursday evening before the
team left was a success . .. We liked especially the
efficient manner in which the program was han-
dled . . . This year every member of the eleven
was introduced to the crowd . ..
I have an idea that the writer of the editorial
quoted was not present at the "pep" rally held at
Ann Arbor Friday night; I have grave doubts as
to whether he was present at the "pep" rally held
Thursday at Columbus. Perhaps I'm wrong, but
no one when asked seems to remember having seen
or heard any member of the football team at the
rally, much less "introduced to the crowd," ex-
cept at the very end of the rally, and then the
members of the team quietly appeared and disap-
peared into their respective cabs without a word
to the crowd. It reminds one of the (P) dispatch
appearing Friday in a Toledo paper; it seems that
there was a big bonfire on the campus before the

team left, and then the student body accompanied
the team down High Street to the station.
To those who had the good fortune to be present
at the "pep" meeting at Michigan, it was indeed
quite a contrast to the one held here. There the
meeting was held indoors in a beautiful addito-
rium. The place was packed to the doors soon
after the meeting started. On the stage appeared
the band, the cheerleaders, Hurry Up Yost, the
athletic director; Judge Day of Toledo, and vari-
ous other alumni. The band played, the speakers
did their "stuff," and the crowd sang and cheered
with the aid of cheerleaders. All songs and yells
were trown on a screen suspended across the back
of the stage.
The talks given by the alumni and Hurry Up
Yost, the athletic director, were inspiring and
full of pep, and were enthusiastically received by
the students apd the large number of alumni mak-
ing up the crowd. To listen to Mr. Yost. one would
think it was an Ohio State "pep" meeting, for the
spent at least two-thirds of his time praising
things pertaining to Ohio State.
Outsiders at the rally, and I noticed many Ohio
men there, were treated to something a little dif-
ferent when each speaker stood up to speak to the
crowd. As each stood up to address the crowd he
doffed his suitcoat and rolled up his sleeves. Just
an old Michigan custom. Incidentlly, none of the
Michigan yells ended with a "Beat Ohio;" not one.
After the rally was over, the band marched

**

Cooloo Blake........... Lillian Harvey
Ronne Gregory...... , ......Lew Ayres
Gerald Gregory... Charles Butterworth
Cupid ................ Harry Langdon
"My Weakness" is a comedy form of the Cin-
derella story. But there is quite a bit more to
this story of a chamber-maid who is elevated to
to the position of a lady. The elevation comes
about because of a bet between Ronne Gregory
and his uncle about the ability of Cooloo Blake
to marry a rich man. The complications are
flavored by good incidental music, by Miss Har-
vey's adolescent charm, by Charles Butterworth's
unique comedy, and by Harry Langdon's presence
as cupid, a role to which he is well suited. Note-
worthy features of "My Weakness" the settings
done by Gordon Wiles, the beautiful girls, and es-
pecially the laughs.
Along with the feature picture there are the
news reel, a Grantland Rice Sportlight about.
wrestling, and a comedy which would be better
in the cutting room than on the screen.
-C. B. C.
The School of Music Symphony Orchestra, Earl
V. Moore, Conductor, and the University Glee
Club, David Mattern, Conductor, and Thelma
Lewis, soprano and Ruth Pfohl, harpist, will unite
forces in giving a concert in Adrian before the
Lenawee County Women's Federation of Clubs
tomorrow.
The program will consist of two parts as fol-
lows :
PART I
University Symphony Orchestra
Earl V. Moore, Conductor
Thelma Lewis, Soprano
Prelude to "Die Meistersinger" ..........Wagner
Aria, "Dich, theure Halle" from
"Tannhauser". .......................Wagner

AT THE MICHIGAN
"MY WEAKNESS"
Cast

OF CAMPUS

ACTIVITY

P~urchasedl

Y our
ENSIAN
or $1.Do-wn
Payment
'Eusians anid
Student
Directories
On Sale at
'Stud ent
Publications
Building.

$4.25

MAI LED

F ITZ

u u

I M, X& m -WA m X.I.t

Thursday
Nov. 9, at 8:15
in
Hill Auditorium

Thelma Lewis
Procession to the Minster, Act II;
Prelude to Act III; from
"Lohengrin".........................
PART II
University Glee Club
David Mattern, Conductor

Wagner I

Tickets

$1. $1.50, $2.

Laudes atque Carmina ...............Stanley
A Mighty Fortress is Our God.... Luther-Brewer
"War Song" from "Cross of Fire"........ Bruch
Czechoslovakia Dance Song... Arranged by Krone
Glee Club
Solos for Harp
Lamento.......................Hasselman
"Barcarolle" from "Tales
of Hoffman"........... .......Offenbach
Reverie.........................Robinson
Ruth Pfohl
Life Thine Eyes......................Logan
Songs of Michigan
Varsity ............................... Moore
College Days...........................Moore
Goddess of the Inland Seas:....Peters-Stanley
When Night Falls......................Welch
Victors...............................Elbel
The Yellow and the Blue ......... Balfe-Stanley
Glee Club
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
The Purdue Exponent rumors the formation of
a "We Ain't Been To The Fair But We Have
Heard All About It" club for the convenience and
protection of the small minority that have not
attended the Chicago show.
College students of today are superior physically
to generations of students in years past,*according
to a survey made at Harvard University.
Every male student at the University of
California must undergo two weeks of foot-
ball training; one week in the line and one
in the backfield.
In a survey at Hunter College, New York, it was
found that of the 650 co-eds only one intends to
marry after graduation. The others are planning
to work.
Reaching peculiar heights in cirricula, Butler
University is now offering a course in the art of
staying married. The professor, twice a victim of
matrimony himself, proposes to advise along all
angles of the institution.
Observings from here and there - One of
the youngest college students this year is at-
tending Marshall College at Sandyville, W. Va.
He is only thirteen years of age - Harvard
men who desire employment are enrolled in
a social register whose business it is to furnish
male escorts for "Deb" parties -Statistics
prove that married students at Wyoming Uni-
versity average better grades than those un-
attached.
The University of North Carolina is to have a
new battle song. This song, by Kay Kaiser, is
built up on all traditional songs and yells of the
University. Kaiser is doing his best in an attempt
to revive cheering at his Alma Mater.
Stanford University rules that queens must
weigh at least 150 pounds. In this case, there
wouldn't be many beauty queens represented at
these new enny aou n dm dances.

A limited number of
season tickets are still
available at $5., $7,
$8.50 and $10

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