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October 28, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CHIGAN DAILY
Established_1890

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estern European nations have been extending
credit to Russia and have found that she meets
her obligations. Critics say, however, that Russia
cannot meet her obligations in original cash and
that she has no goods which can be of any use
to us. Russia, however, does have articles which
wecan use. Outstanding among them is platinum.
Lastly Russia will buy more from the United
States than from Western Europe since the geo-
graphical condition of the U.S.S.R. is much more
flike that of the United- States than it is like the
I other European nations and the United States is,
therefore, already producing many of the articles
which Russia will use, We have had experience
in producing capital goods suitable to a nation
which bears a great similarity in its needs to the
Russian nation. We can, then, produce much of
what Russia needs at a lower cost than it can be
the produced elsewhere.
4nI

Student Health
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Published every morning except Monday during,
University year and Summer Session by the Board
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Assoc
tion a-'-I the Big Ten News Service.
zociatedC ollegiate _trezs
- , r193 3 N ATIAL _, a_ ic 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to theu
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local ne
published herein. All rights of republication of spe
dispatches are reserved.'
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan,
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted'
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by ma
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75;1
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Stre
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Represeitatives: College Publications Representativ
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City;
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Aven
Chicago.
EDITORIAL S PAFF
Telephone 4925

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MANAGING EDITOR...........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR..............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR......................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR ..................ALBERT HA. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
Ram G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
'Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans., Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried. Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene, Burnett B. Levick, David G. Mac-
Donald, & Proctor McGeachy, Joel P. Newman, John M.
O'Connell, Kenneth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George I.
Quimby, Mitchell Raskin, William R. Reed, Robert S.
Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Han mer,
Florence 'Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Rosalie Resnick, Mary
Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER..........
............... CATHERINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-
iger. Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, Norman Smith,David Wink-,
worth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
French Decision
And World Peace ..".
T HE NEED for a strong international
peace instrument is strikingly il-.
lustrated by the announcement of Albert Sarraut,
the new French premier, that France will not
enter separate negotiations with Germany about
disarmament. This makes the need for interna-
tional organization..clear.
It is diMcult to see how world peace can ever be
effected through other means. Disarmament, even
if it were possible, would accomplish nothing to-
ward solution of economic conflicts which pre-
cipitate wars.
When any nation, be it large or small, is able
to air its diplomatic grievances before an interna-
tional tribunal interested in justice and able to
enforce it, then will there be world peace.
Some Economic Aspects
Of Russian Recognition ...
OW MUCH benefit will accrue to
business and, therefore, to unem-
ployment in the United States as the result of
the recognition of Russia, is a matter of question.
Judging from the opinions of the most reputable'
economists it seems that the great hopes expressed
in large figures by the advocates of recognition
are gross exaggerations of the facts.
Whatever goods Russia buys from the United
States will be in the capital or producing category,
not in the consumptive - class. Thus, recognition
will bring employmentto men in a line of indus-
try which has been scarcely touched by the N.R.A.
The greatest gain in employment under the NRA
has been in the consumption goods industries and
the new demand created by this increased employ-
ment has also been for consumption goods.
The questions which naturally arise, however,
are: How much will Russia want, how will she
pay for it, and why will she buy from the United
States rather than from the nations of western
Europe? The amount which Russia will buy de-
pends on how much she can use that she has not
already been buying. The enthusiasts seem to for-
get that Russia has already been buying a large
amount of capital goods from the United States,
that American industrialists have been dealing
with her although their government has not rec-
ognized the U.S.S.R. With government co-opera-
tion this trade will undoubtedly gain but it will
not be new.
Professor Jamieson, of Cleveland, an engineer

of some importance, estimates the employment in
capital industries which would be created by rec-

Washington
Off The Record
By SIGRID ARNE
MRS. ISABELLA GREENWAY, the newly elec-
ted representative from Arizona, was rushing
to a noon hour interview with Secretary Ickes.
She pictured a hungry secretary and decided
not to mention public works for her state.
Being hungry herself, she stopped for a glass of
milk and some apples. Still carrying one of the
apples, she was ushered into Ickes' office.
"I just want to pay my respects," she smiled.
"But what about those irrigation projects for
Arizona?" asked the secretary.
"Well, I thought you'd be too hungry to hear
about them," hesitated the lady.
"Never eat lunch," said Ickes.
"Well, have an apple," offered Mrs. Greenway.
Ickes smiled and remarked, "Nothing Biblical
in this, I hope." But he took the apple.
Senator Robert J. Bulkley, Ohio, finally gave
up hunting a quiet place to study in the country.
He is in Europe with two trunks. One holds
clothes. The other holds books on monetary mat-
ters.
NOTE to an unidentified motorist from Colo-
rado.
The other day when you were rounding the cor-
ner at the White House so fast you just missed a
tall lady in blue who ran out of your road pulling
a little black dog on a leash. That was Mrs.
Roosevelt and "Meggie."
A TTORNEY GENERAL CUMMINGS has re-
ceived some very "valuable advice" concern-
ing Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay, which
the department of justice is converting into a Fed-
eral prison.
"Just populate the waters around the island
with man-eating sharks," writes a man to Cum-
mings. "Keep them half-fed so they will be on
the look-out for escaping prisoners."
The correspondent sent along a diagram of a
fence to be built in the bay to keep the harks
whee they can help Federal officers guard the is-
lands.
The White House has sheltered four genera-
tions of the same family for the first time, as far
as anyone remembers. The President was visited
by his mother recently. At the same time his
daughter, Mrs. Anna Dall, and her two children
were guests at the mansion.
SENATOR CARTER GLASS of Virginia abom-
nates breakfast in his room. But he had it,
and liked it, in Austria recently. He is just back
from Europe and tells the story on himself.
He was traveling with Admiral Gary T. Gray-
son, physician to former President Wilson.
They got up early one day for a walk. But
when they looked in the hall for polished shoes
there were none. They grabbed room phones and
demanded shoes.
"Yah, yah-certainly," agreed the desk.
In a few minutes there arrived six waiters with
trays bearing coffee, tea, chocolate, chops, fish
and eggs.
The maitre d'hotel had commandeered every
tray in the kitchen to appease the distinguished
and (as he thought) hungry Americans.
Youth is making market inroads in the halls
of Congress. There are three representatives un-
der 30 years of age; Joseph P. Monoghan, Mon-
tana; James Simpson, Jr., Illinois, and Robert Se-
crist of Ohio. Four others are 31 years of age.
There are 57 between the ages of 27 and 40.
T HERE has been one embarassed newspaperman
, attending the President's press conferences.
Each time he has had to ask, "Are there any ap-
pointments for the District of Columbia?"
Each time. the President answered, "Nothing
today." The question and answer finally drew
laughs from the rest of the crowd.
Then the reporter got around it by asking his
question in French..
Without a change of expression President
Roosevelt replied, "Rien du tout, aujourdhui."

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
It has been proved at the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology that it is cheaper to be a
blonde than a brunette or red-head. This report
is based on poundage, blondes usually weighing
several pounds less than their darker sisters.
Washington University co-eds have a spe-
cial section for "'bachelor girls" at football
games. They say in this manner the men can
tell who's who.

FRESHMAN GYM
"The wealth of the mind is the only true wealth."
Students who believe this usually find freshman
gym an unmitigated bore. It breaks in on more
important activities; it makes them late for din-
ner; it exposes them to colds; makes blisters,
"charley horses," and no end of uncomfortable
things. And surely, such a limited amount of ex-
ercise can not improve their health anyway, Why
freshman gym at all?
There are reasons - the historical ones and
others which might appeal to the person not in-
terested in building up bulging muscles or win-
ning renown in the Turnverin. Gym, in fostering
physical recreation, strengthens the zest for life.
The gate receipts at athletic events proves that it
is p o s s i b 1 e to obtain this effect from merely
watching a game. How much greater it mustbe
to participate. People can create from mere phys-
icdl activity; whether times are good or bad,
grades A or E, whether popularity comes or not.
These individuals know how to carry on with their
games; pushing, pulling, running, jumping, climb-
ing and tumbling, indepedent of all social and
economic forces. They make happiness out of
their own activity. Can anyone deny that zest for
life is a desirable quality worth purchasing at -a
great price?
An opportunity to learn and develop the nec-
essary technique is afforded in gym work. Through
new exercises, new games, new methods ,one learns
about parts of himself whose existence he never
suspected. The development and efficient function
of these parts gives one a pleasant sense of well-
being, self-confidence and awareness that he is
all there, able to carry on even though he is on
probation and his girl has gone off on a pout.
Two hours a week are sufficient to teach the pro-
cedure, but it remains to individual initiative to
employ it in adequate quantities.
A second justification for gym work is the op-
portunity it gives for the encouragement of sports-
manship. Physical education has no monopoly on
sportsmanship. It is a quality required in every
activity at every age, but in physical combat, the
quality is isolated. It is possible to recognize poor
sportsmanship so easily there and seeing it's rot-
tenness, be forever resolved to avoid it in all its
forms.
A third justification is the promotion of courage.
Dr. May does not conduct gladiatorial combats,
but he does compel his boys to assume attitudes
of aggressiveness that are quite strange to men
who have grown up with a sense of inferiority.
It does them good to learn how to act compe-
teritly, it helps to make them feel capable. If they
are taught, they will be more qualified.
The subject of physical health has not been
mentioned. There is no evidence to show that
freshman gym has anything to do with health,
but anyone who has had a good workout and a
shower will never deny that he is most keenly
aware of that incomparable sensation of health.
If gym work does nothing more than inciden-
tally foster the zest for life, sportsmanship, cour-
age and the appreciation of health, that is reason
enough for the two hour bore.
This is not an official statement from the,
Department of Physical Education. It probably
has an entirely different reason for conducting the
course.
A Washington
BYSTANDER
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Oct. 27. - The more one studies
the Roosevelt-Kalinin notes, the more it ap-
pears that far-reaching international political
strategy rather than the farm surplus and related
problems at home may have dictated the timing of
that recognition gesture by the White House.
Unless Mr. Roosevelt some day elects to say
exatly what was in his mind on October 10 when
he wrote his note to President Kalinin it always
will be a matter of conjecture. So many con-
siderations were urging him forward that it is
difficult to isolate the one that finally moved
him to act.
* * *
T could have been no more than happy coin-
cidence for the White House that permitted
announcement of the impending Roosevelt-Lit-
vinoff conversations right on the heels of the call

for a national farm strike. Yet the glowing pros-
pect of a Russian market eager to absorb a sub-
stantial part of the American farm surplus was
bound to have its own quieting effect in the farm
belt.
With that, too, goes the rising clamor for cur-
rency inflation. There also the Russo-American
conversations may be expected to ease farm bloc
pressure on the White House somewhat. The
promptness with which Senator Elmer Thomas,
leading inflationist, hailed the mere exchange of;
notes as an act of de facto recognition is symp-
tomatic.
'ET it seems unlikely that these considerations
were uppermost in Mr. Roosevelt's mind when
he sat down October 10 to write his note to Pres-
ident Kalinin in Moscow.
The soviet official spokesmanx at Moscow,
stressed, above all, the international peace .aspect
of an impending Russo-American rapprochement,
in giving out the text of the notes.
And the Manchurian situation, the Russo-Ja-
pan clash over the Chinese Eastern railway's fu-
ture ownership and the effect restoration of dip-
lomatic relations between the United States and
Russia might have in that connection clearly
stood first in the Moscow spokesman's mind.
WAS the far-eastern situation and the threat
to world peace from that quarter, of peculiar
interest to the United States, uppermost in Presi-
dent Roosevelt's mind when he wrote his note of
October 10?

i

LAST TWO PERFORMANCES

Saturday, Oct. 28--2:30--8:30

Uncle om'sCbi

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

i

Special

Prices for Matinee

Phone 6300 for Reservations

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111111 1 *

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1.1111-1
MIC HIGAN
DAILY
CLAS SIFTED
ADS
GET
RESULTS

I

DO0N'T POUR DOWN.THESINK
the very food values you pay for!
The practice of buying vegetables, cooking them in a great
deal of water, and then pouring this flavor-laden and mineral.
laden water down the sink is extremely wasteful. It means
losing the very elements you pay for. This is what you are
obliged to do if you cook with an old-fashioned stove. Unless
you purchase special waterless cooking appliances, you are
forced to throw away nourishing and important food values.
An ELECTRIC RANGE is different. Foods cook to melting
tenderness in their own juices, with a minimum of water. You
do not have to BOIL FOODS AWAY to cook them. You use
no water for roasts, and half a cup of water is ample for
vegetables: Vegetables are steam-cooked instead of being
boiled, and precious minerals and healthful natural elements
are conserved. The table below (Journal of Home Economics)
shows why STEAM.COOKED vegetables are more healthful:
LOSS OF NUTRITIVE VALUE IN VEGETABLES -
STEAMING VS. BOILING
(Journal of Home Economics, Vol27, No.5)
AVERAGE OF ALL VEGETABLES
Dry Matter Protein Calcium Magnesium Iron Phosphorue
Lass Lose Loss Loss Lose Losa
Boiled . - 39.4 43.0 37.0 44.7 46.4 48.0
Steamed . 14.0 16.0 13.0 18.6 16.7 21.3
You can own a modern electric range for $89.50 installed. See them on
display'at your dealer's or any Detroit Edison office.
THE DETROIT E DISON co.
THE CO.

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DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS ARE EFFECTIVE

ReligiousActivities

First Methodist
Episcopal
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick S.Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worship.
"Is One Religion As Good
. C'As Another"
Dr. Fisher
(Next Sunday- "My Personal
Religious Experience")
STALKER HALL'
12:15 - Half-hour forum on the ser-
mon. Led by Dr. Fisher.
3:00- International Student Forum,
discussion on "The Causes of War,"
led by John Brumm and Ralph
Seigalman.
. 6:O - Guild Worship Service with
Dean Wilber R. Humphreys speak-
ing on "The Bible as a Guide' to
an Adequate Personal Religion."
5t. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
October 29
9:30 A.M. - Sunday School and Bible
Class.
9:30 A.M. - Reformation Service in
German.
10:45 A.M. -Reformation Service in
English.
Sermon by the Pastor-

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 a.m.-Bible School. Lesson topic:
"Justification by Faith".
10:30 A.M.-Service in English. Rev.
SH :Knoll f Detroitdwill speak.
Topic :
"The Secret of
Great Life"
5:30 P.M.-Student Forum: Reforma-
tion Day Service

First Baptist
Church
512 East Huron
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman,
Minister for Students
9:30-The Church School. Dr. A. J.
Logan, Superintendent
Morning Worship
10:45 - Mr. Sayles will preach on the
subject:
"The Radicalism of Jesus"
12:00 The Student group will meet
at Guild House, 503 E. Huron. Mr.
Chapman and Arthur Bernhart.
6:00-Student Meeting. Mr. Chapman
will speak on "Religion as Power."
Social hour and refreshments follow.

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.
"Rammahun Roy and
Annie Beant"

St. Andrews
Episcopal
Division at Catherine Street
Tomorrow 11:00 A.M.
CHOIR SUNDAY
Special Musical Program
St. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

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