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October 25, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

The Theatre
MODERNIZING
UNCLE TOM

4 11

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Lp.G1 M. iN N' f N '' p nfo
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion a-d the Big Ten News Service.
xzzodatuI 1oUlate '# re~z
1933 A1 'wCOVERAGE1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer byrcarrier, $1.00; by mall.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier. $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices:, Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor,, Michigan. Phone: 2-41l4.
Represei,\tatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR........... ... C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR... ..............BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.,
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene, Burnett B. Levick, David G. Mac-
Donald, S. Proctor McGeachy, Joel P. Newman, John M.
O'Connell,'Kenneth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George I.
Quimby, Mitchell Raskin, William R. Reed, Robert S.
Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hammer,
Florence Harper, Marie Hed, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine.McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Rosalie Resnick, Mary
Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret Spencer.

By KARL SEIFFERT
Uncle Tom, once the personification of senti-
mental appeal and for decades ace tear-jerker of
Broadway and the road, has gone psychological.
The cruelly-whipped old slave and the hard-
pressed Eliza with the bloodhounds hot on her
trail have come back, but no longer will they serve
as mediums for the dissemination of rank hokum
and lump-in-the-throat sentimentality.
They are genuine characters now, and though
once they wailed and heaved mightily to give the
gallery a thrill, they and all their fellow martyrs
have taken on a new dignity, at least if what
Director Valentine B. Windt has tried to do is
successful.
The Players' production of "Uncle Tom's Cabin"
is certain, at least, to be different. The George
L. Aiken dramatization of the Stowe novel is, in
Mr. Windt's mind, very bad.
"The only good lines in the Aiken script," he
said, "are the ones he lifted bodily from the novel.
The rest of them are pretty bad. So, in order to
portray as closely as possible what Mrs. Stowe
meant to convey in her book, we took the Aiken
play and rewrote it for our own purpose. We cut
out his sentimentality and preserved the true emo-
tion which the Stowe book doubtless has."
Are the Players "horsing" Uncle Tom? No! says
Director Windt. "Obviously," he says, "there are
elements-like Eliza fleeing the bloodhounds over
the ice-cakes-that simply cannot be done in com-
plete seriousness. A modern audience will not ac-
cept the sentimentality that the Mid-Victorians
liked so well. If we are to present a really intelli-
gent version of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" we cannot
ignore the humor that certainly exists in some of
its passages."
But the "genuine emotion" which Mr. Windt
declares the Stowe novel contains is being pre-
sented, he says, and being presented as completely
as limitations of staging, make-up, and amateur
acting will permit.
EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was written by
Mr. Seiffert when the Michigan Repertory Play-
ers presented Uncle Tom's Cabin last summer.
Valentine B. Windt, director then and now, has
assured us that the observations made in this ar-
ticle hold for his current production, which opens
tonight at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre for a
four-days' run.

following day she returned to the class. The
professor handed her note back with a signed
declaration, "Yes, I do!"
Co-eds at Rollins College, a small western school,
recently took part in a Little International Live-
stock Show. However, only four girls entered the
milking contest while the rest were satisfied to
enter the riding event.
"You silly co-eds come here for a sorority
so that you can marry something in a frater-
nity", an English professor told a mass meet-
ing of co-eds at Stanford University.
A thief with a celestial outlook on life stole a
set of keys for a harp from a Minnesota sorority
house.
Students at Southwestern University voted on
their favorite magazines recently. Cosmopolitan
led, with Good Housekeeping running a close sec-
ond. Others with high ratings were: The New
Yorker, College Humor, Current Events and De-
tective Stories.
We note that magazines such as Harper's and
Atlantic Monthly didn't rate at all. Well, neither
did True Story.
A professor at Manchester College will give
an "A" to anyone in his American Poetry class
who when drunk can write as good poetry as
Poe did. Tut! Tut! Such motivation.
The University of Dayton News has dug up
these rules that existed (and were enforced) at
Salem College in 1732.
1. Baths can be taken only by special permis-
sion and at times indicated by the professor.
2. Sleeping quarters are not to be visited by
students during the day.
3. The strictest order is to be ovserved in the
embroidery room.
4. Pupils are never to go out of sight or hear-
ing of the instructor or professor when walking.
Beer and football must not mix, is the
opinion of the University of Minnesota's offi-
cials, who refused to sanction radio broadcasts
of Minnesota football games if sponsored by
brewing companies.
When a student at St. Bonaventure was
asked who Karl Marx was, he calmly and
dutifully replied, "I think he's the one that
plays the harp." And are Russia's ears pink?
Conversational ability is the most important
factor in dating is the report coming from a sur-
vey held at The University of Delaware. Few men
would admit that appearances were not important,
and all men require that their dates be good
dancers. Blind dates are not common, especially
among the women, and "pick up" dates are rare,
according to reports, Dances, movies and auto
rides are the most popular forms of entertainment.
And here is how Oxford students look at it:
"Drinking is considered a recreation here,
and if it is performed in a degree of moder-
ation, nothing is ever said about it."
Many strange things are to be found on college
campuses but the queerest of them all has at last
come to light at Louisiana State College. There
is a toad farm! Believe it or not there is a lovely
collection of toads, although opinions may differ
as to their individual beauty.

II
II

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER..........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER..........
.................CATHERINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-
iger, Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, Norman Smith, David Wink-
worth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, WinifredrBell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause,' Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN C. HEALEY
Roosevelt Opposed From
Left, Not Right . .
T HE ROOSEVELT administration is
now facing its first great crisis,
critical not only to the administration but also to
the future of the country. The present situation is
not one worked up by crafty opposition leaders.
It is real and -what is more, more dangerous to
the future of the Republican party than the
Democratic.
Labor, organized under section 7a of the
National Industrial Recovery Act, is asserting
itself and has been joined by the hitherto silent
but suffering farmer class. In the present strike
movement in industry and agriculture lie the
foundations of what may be a new party. When
the R6osevelt administration took office, it was
considered extremely liberal. Unquestionably, its
policies have been much more liberal than those
of the Republican administrations which preceded
it. But the liberal trend has gone ahead, beyond
the administrations control and desire. Leaders
like Milo Reno have come into the foreground of
the new movement.1
Sunday, the voice of the Rev. Fr,. Charles E.
Coughlin was added to the new movement. Last
fall and this spring, the 'radio priest' was one of
the chief heralds of the "New Deal." Apparently,
his liberalism has also gone beyond that of the
administration.
The administration has got into the bad graces
of the liberals because it has not put teeth in the
NRA, has not taken any steps in the direction of
the currency inflation demanded by the unem-
ployed and farmer classes, has not been stern
enough with the industrialists in the drafting of
the NRA codes, has retained William Woodin in
the position of secretary of the treasury despite
the revelation of his dealings with the house of
Morgan, and has made unrealized promises of six
million men at work by Labor Day. and the like.
It is significant that the first real opposition to
the administration's policies comes not from the
right but from the left. The Roosevelt administra-
tion is in the position of the liberal chamber gov-
ernment which undertook a legislative revolt
against Louis XVI, just previous to the French
Revolution. This group stirred the fires of discon-
tent and then was unable to quench them when
they went out of control. The latent discontent of
both labor and agriculture was stirred by the ad-
ministration during the campaign and since the
inauguration. The new administrtaion therefore
proceeded in a liberal direction. But, they may
have started something which they cannot stop

Musical Events
BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Koussevitsky! Director of a great orchestra!
Koussevitsky, before he settled down to the per-
formance, seemed happy to be back at Hill Audi-
torium. The audience, certainly, was glad to see
him at this first concert.
The small string orchestra gave the Mozart
"Eine Kleine Nachtmusick" a vigorous, bright in-
terpretation, true to the Mozart tradition of clar-
ity and graciousness. There was an astringent
quality to it, with the top violin-voices singing
out over the others in the fashion of the time of
the piece. There was no yielding to tempting
lyric spots, but a swing and zest that at once es-
tablished a bond between the performers and lis-
teners.
Then came the Stravinsky! Either Americans
are becoming inured to dissonances and outspoken
tonal- statements, or else they are not as sure of
their likes and dislikes as Italians and French, for
instance for the Rites of Spring was accepted en-
thusiastically, yet with private reservations. It
appreciated the barbarous spirit of the work,
though some, perhaps most, of the Rites remained
harsh and startling in its clash and its queer
little fragments. Koussevitsky urged it on, and
on, with whirls of rhythm and dissonance and
spurts of color. This last, particularly, was an
outstanding characteristic, that of differentiation
of tone qualities, even in full orchestra passages.
(A full orchestra it was, too). Contrasts of mood
were emphasized, the "spontaneous" bursts of en-
ergy, the anticipatory fragments of melody, the
movement into strong pulses from disjointedness,
each were given their moments.
The Brahms, under Koussevitsky, took on a
drive and direction, that in others' readings be-
comes lost in its length. The second movement,
played at a slower speed than was expected, held
together. Again, the color, the quality of instru-
mental individualities was brought out, and gave
an arresting point to otherwise hidden spots. The
basses, a renowned section of this orchestra, deep-
ened and gave a foundation to the Brahms, es-
pecially satisfying.
The concert had more significance than a con-
cert, a series of pieces, played on an October eve-
ning. Koussevitsky gave it a unifying basis of
human interest. A summary of varieties of hu-
manity lay there. The social aspect, the cream
of life, having no problems, appeared in the Mo-
zart. The atavistic temperament raged through
the Rites of Spring, and the humane individual
with ideals, and hopes, finally realized, underlay
the Brahms. The point is, that, sure enough
man is a gay, witty, social and altogether delight
ful creature, without cares, without struggles, and
sure enough, man is an animal, a natural being
but, beyond that, man is a rationalizing grow
ing, striving organism, with a pattern of life tha
must expand, and be realized. That one mar
could with a single program bring together thes
aspects and then demonstrate the was th
achievement of last night's concert. It was rare
It was thrilling. -Sally Place.

t
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10th October, 1933.
Messrs. Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co.
324 South State Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.
Dear Sirs:-
Thank you for your recent order and beg to advise that there
is a TWENTY-FIVE PER CENT increase in labor and mate-

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A Washington
BYSTANDER
"5,n

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al

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WASHINGTON-In the face of a rising murmur
of doubts about the effectiveness of the ad-
ministration's NRA prosperity restoratives, Sep-
tember re-employment statistics supplied by the
labor department gave the Washington "new deal-
ers," from President Roosevelt down, a pleasurable
fillip. Reduced to understandable form, they rep-
resented a definite rounding into the back stretch
for the whole recovery program.
Previously the administration estimate of prog-
ress made toward the recovery goal was one-third.
Secretary Perkins' figures coupled with other data
were computed by government economists as ex-
tending that to two-fifths. That reported frac-
tional gain made in 30 days is an enormously
heartening thing to the President and his ad-
visers.
* * *

gill

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DIRECT FROM
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Miss Louise Carroll is at our
South University store to help
you solve your beauty prob-
lems. 'i

WHILE Miss Perkins' statement probably lent'
fuel to the fire of congressional criticism as to
slowness with which the huge public works com-
panion job-maker is getting under way, by the
same token it emphasized NRA accomplishments.
If the September re-employment figures, as
Madam Secretary said, do not reflect public works
enterprises because they are moving to the em-
ployment stage too slowly to come into the pic-
ture yet, NRA must be largely responsible for the
620,000 new jobs reported.
i* * *
NO NEW MODEL
IT MAY be significant that the publication of
the new recovery figures synchronized closely
with a general stiffening of attitude in Washing-
ton behind the NRA program.
All inlicators tended to confirm the impression
that the White House is preparing to drive ahead
for another year with substantially the recovery
machinery now in motion.
Its broader, permanent legislative projects-and
they are quite definite in substance if not in form
-lie beyond the January session of congress.
CHANGES AHEAD
TFHERE are exceptions. A revamping of the

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Collegiate Observer
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