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October 25, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-25

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A933 THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

PLAY &
BY-0PLAY

KipkemenWork
On Defense For
Saturday's Game

'-By AL NEWMAN-1
Empire Falls -
Consensus .
THE ROMAN EMPIRE has long
since fallen. Once the barbarians
pushed right through to the capital
and Byzantium became the Oriental
center for a Western civilization, that
civilization was dead. Yes, but what
has that got to do with football?
Another empire has fallen, and the
capital of Rockne system football
will move elsewhere. Notre Dame 0,
Kansas 0; Notre Dame 12, Indiana 2;
Notre Dame 0, Carnegie Tech 7.
That's the story of the decline and
fall of the capital in three very short
chapters.
It's all a mystery. At the begin-
ning of the season, Notre Dame was
doped to have a wealth of outstand-
ing material. Nobody seems to know
just what has happened.
Yes, and a lot of people are sorry
about it. I am not including myself
in that group. It's hard to sympa-
thize with an arrogantly wealthy
person who has lost his money, and
I amnot here to decry thedownfall
of a football team which for years
made a practice of deliberately run-
ning up huge and humiliating scores
on weak opponents. And that is the
crime which I lay at the door of
Notre Dame.
No, the old tyrannical civilization
was too cruel for anybody to be sorry
about its downfall. For years the
Ramblers have dished it out. Now
let's sit back and watch them take
it!
AFTER LAST SATURDAY'S spasm
of even-Stephen football games,
we of the sports staff are playing
ostrich. Everybody is afraid to fig-
ure up the results of last week's
Consensus. It was all just too ter-
rible. Until last week we were .888
correct, which is considered pretty
fair considering that the New York
Evening Post's Consensus of nine ex-
perts was only correct to about .765.
In fact, somebody has made away
with the sheet which recorded the
choices of the staff, and I fear that
it is one of the juniors with a par-
ticularly bad record. I need a good
detective. Will someone please ap-

Frosh Demonstrate

New

Formations Wolverines
Will Meet At Chicago
Use Butterfly Shift
Varsity Develops Tricky
Plays Built On Lateral
And Forward Passes
Rain and cold winds combined to
force the Varsity gridders indoors
yesterday, and an uninspired practice
resulted. In the bleak environs of
the Field House the Kipkemen put up
a listless defense against a yearling
team using Chicago plays. The Var-
sity backs stood around and shivered
while the pseudo-Maroons made weak
attempts to baffle Michigan's for-
ward wall.
The Chicago offense at least has
the distinction of being something
new and different. It is called the
butterfly shift. It involves the guards,
tackles and ends.
3 Games-72 Points
Using this offense, the Maroons
ran up 32 points against Cornell Col-
lege, and 40 points against Washing-
ton University of St. Louis. Purdue
smothered it last week on a wet,
slow field.
Advance dope has it that Chicago's
new coach, r Clark Shaughnessy, is
planning a deceptive passing attack,
especially for the Wolverines. Realiz-
ing the futility of attempting to make
ground through Michigan's forward
wall, the Maroons will probably take
to the air. They have capable passers
and receivers. If they catch the Wol-
verines on an off day, it may be
fatal.
Coach Kipke indicated that his re-
serves might see plenty of action Sat-
urday by also running them through
a long defensive workout, following
the Varsity session with the frosh.
Work on New Plays
The Varsity then went to one side
and commenced drill on special plays
for this week's game. Wolverine fol-
lowers are getting accustomed to the
spectacle of a Maize and Blue team
with a sparkling offense. The Kipke-
men have been concentrating on de-
ceptive plays for the last few weeks
with excellent results.
One of the most effective plays of
all was the forward pass followed
by a lateral pass. It leaves the defense
wide open. Kipke has numerous va-
riations of this play and Chicago may
expect something on this order Sat-
urday.
Kipke used the same eleven men
who saw duty most of the time
against Ohio State. The) backfield
combination of Fay, Heston, Ever-
hardus and Regeczi, with Renner al-
ternating, seems to have become per-
manent.
HICKS IN MEXICO
MEXICO D. F. Oct. 24- (IP ) -
Helen Hicks, former American cham-
pion, and Charlotte Glutting, New
Jersey star, will play in the Mexican
golf championships to be held here
Nov. 1-5.

Union Gridgraph Will
Depict Chicago Game
The Michigan Union's new Grid-
graph will be used to furnish an
account of an out-of-town game
for the first time Saturday, when
it will furnish a graphic cover of
the Chicago-Michigan tilt a Stagg
Field, Chicago.
The machine will be operated
directly from the press box at the
field and will give fans at home a
chance to see a play graphically
reproduced immediately after the
actual happening on the field.
The Union has invited all stu-
dents interested, both men and
women, to be present in the Ball-
room at 2:00 p. m. Saturday. A
small admission charge will be
made.
Fordham eets
Alabama Outfit
In Feature Tilt
NEW YORK, Oct. 24-(P)- Jimmy
Crowley, hoping for an undefeated
season in his first year as coach at
Fordham University, awaits the in-
vasion of Alabama's Crimson Tide
with not a little apprehension.
His scouts have brought reports
from the south of a line averaging
better than 200 pounds, a powerful,
tricky backfield and adequate re-
placements. Outside of that, they
say, Fordham has nothing whatever
to worry about.
"The breaks will decide this game,"
Earl Walsh, an assistant coach and
scout for the Rams, says. "Those
'Bama boys are good, just as good
and just as big as we are. I look
for a close score with the winner
requiring a break or two."
Some southern critics have labelled
Alabama as the "perfect team." They
declined to change their opinion even
after the Tide had been held to a
scoreless draw by Mississippi, and
last week's Alabama conquest of
Tennessee at Knoxville where the
volunteers hadn't been beaten since
1924 justified them. Developments
of the past few weeks have indi-
cated, too, that Mississippi is plenty
tough this year in its own right and
that Alabama need not alibi for that
scoreless tie.
Fr'osh X-Country
Men Hold Trials
Candidates for the freshman cross
country team will be put through
their paces this afternoon in a time
trial run over the two and one-half
mile golf course layout. This trial will
be the last one prior tQ the annual
Frosh run scheduled for next Mon-
day afternoon. The latter event is one
of the most determining factors in
deciding the make up of the yearling
squad and competition for places will
be keen.
Judging from their performances
in the last two trial runs the follow-
ing men are expected to show up
well: Wardell, W. Hutchison, Ladd,
C. Frelsford, O'Connell, and W. Stone.

Big Ten Teams
Preparing For
New Opponents
Wildcat-Buckeye Contest
Looms As One Of Best
On Saturday's Card
CHICAGO, Oct. 24-P)-With Big
Ten championship hopes, born after
two non-conference victories, com-
pletely out of the picture, football
at the University of Chicago got back
to normalcy this week.
What visions of a title the Ma-
roons had were blurred by Purdue's
14 to 0 win.
Coach Clark Shaughnessy was not
particularly upset over the Maroons'
defeat but he is a bit apprehensive
of the game Saturday with Michi-
gan. He isn't looking for a victory
over the Wolverines, of course. He
does, however, hope that the Ma-
roons will hold the Wolves to a rea-
sonable score.
Twenty-First Game
It will be the twenty-first meet-
ing of the two universities on the
gridiron. The first game was played
in 1892. Michigan has won 15 of the
contests.
Withthe exception of the Iowa-
Minnesota fracas at Minneapolis, the
next most important game Saturday
is the Northwestern-Ohio State clash
at Columbus. If the Buckeyes ex-
pect an easy foe in the Wildcats they
are sadly mistaken. Dick Hanley's
Cats have a defense that Ohio will
find hard to penetrate. Northwest-
ern will scarcely be able to present
an offense as brilliant and varied as
Michigan did to Ohio State Saturday,
but the Wildcats will be a scoring
threat.
The rivalry between the two teams
is not an old one, but one of the
most strongly contested. Ohio State
holds a 7 to 4 edge in the eleven
meetings since 1913.
The Wildcats' line will be out-
weighed by Ohio's as the Bucks have
the heaviest forward wall in the
Western conference.
Hanley thinks the Cats are due
for a still better showing on offense.
Under bad conditions Saturday
Northwestern managed to score three
touchdowns against the big Indiana
eleven. It was the first sign of an
offense that the Cats have displayed
this season.
Saturday's game is the only away
from home game Northwestern plays
this year.

Faculty Members Play
In Handicap Golf Meet
The members of the University's
faculty are equally as adept at golf
as they are in their profession, as is
evidenced by the results of the first
and second rounds of the Faculty
Handicap Golf Tournament. Each
match was well played and closelyJ
contested; in two cases the ultimate
outcome necessitated the playing of
extra holes. Following are the scores
of the matches played to date: Web-
ster defeated James 2 and 1; For-
sythe defeated Wislar 2 and 1; Mit-
chell beat Wells 1 up, in 21 holes;.
Craig triumphed over Nyswander 6
and 4; Pollack beat Brunn 2 up;
Carvar defeated Carrothers 1 up;
Mann beat Decker 2 and 1; Carvar,
1 up over Mann in 20 holes; Craig
beat Pollack 2 and 1.7
The next round of matches will'
bring together A. E. White and C.
Fisher, the victor to meet Mitchell,
while Webster will play Forsythe.
TWO TOUCHDOWNS?
NEW HAVEN, Conn. - (R') - It's#
worked all right so far but Yale's
two-touchdown "complex" may be
fatal one of these days. So far the
Elis have beaten Maine, 14-7, Wash-
ington & Lee, 14-0, and Brown, 14-6.
That will do until some rival pierces
the Yale defense for three touch-
downs.

Grandson Of Donor
OffWaterman Gym
Tells Of Grid Days
Of interest to many former Michi-
gan alumni is the arrival in Ann
Arbor of Whitney Waterman, Jr.,
grandson of the William Waterman
who gave to the University of Mich-
igan the gymnasium which now bears
his name.
The present Mr. Waterman is the
Michigan Sales Manager for a firm
of California custom tailors who are
introducing their product to Ann Ar-
bor this week.
Although Mr. Waterman did not
follow his father and grandfather's
footsteps in attending Michigan, like
them, he is a former football player.
While a student at Oregon State in
1916, Waterman played right tackle
on the team which came East to play
Michigan State in the first intersec-
tional contest the Beavers had ever
scheduled. Oregon won the game,
28 to 0.

INSIST ON
32-Oz. - a FULL QUART at 15c
(Plus 5c Bottle Deposit)
CAVALIER
PALE DRY GINGER'ALE
and LIME RICKEY
SOLD AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE
Michigan-Chicago
Football Game
WORLD'S FAIR
includes two nigh
at Morrison Hob
95tel, round trip
transportation v
Michigan Central
our special cars.
The Paul Henry Tour
501 Washington Blvd. Bldg.
Detroit
Cadillac 7076- Randolph 8937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

for

AN OFFICIAL RECORD
OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY

$4.25 MAILED

-Fr, $10.00
TO INTRODUCE our Ann Arbor Dealer, we will for FOUR
DAYS ONLY, tailor to your individual measure, one of our
fine ALL WOOL $25.00 HAND-TAILORED SUITS, at an
advertising price of $15.00.
Present this advertisement to Mr. Waterman at 219 South Main
Street, on
Wed., Thurs., Fri, Sat., Oct. 25, 26, 27, 28

VOMEN'S I

I-

S

PO RT

S

I

Terpischorean Points
Participation points will be offered
in a new field of activities on the
women's Intramural card. A new
rhythmic dance club is being organ-
ized, and all houses entering women
in the group will get points towards
the All-Participation cup.
The first meeting of the club will
be held in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall
this evening at 7:30 p. m. The group
will be divided into smaller sections
according to ability and past experi-
ence. Miss Emily White, faculty
dance instructor, will direct the club.
A recital will be presented after prac-
tices have shaped up sufficiently well.
Independent Sports
League teams are being formed un-
der the auspices of the Women's Ath-
letic Association for the women not
attached to any sorority or dormi-
tory organizations, and who wish to
participate in the Intramural con-
tests. Any woman who wishes to
sign up is requested to get in touch
with Miss Marie Hartwig at the Wo-
men's Athletic Building or with Mar-
garet Arnold, student Intramural
manager, at Helen Newberry.
Mosher, Theta's Win
Three more games toward the
hockey championship were decided
recently. Mosher defeated Kappa
Kappa Gamma with a score of 2 to
0 in a battle last week-end at Pal-
mer Field. The Thetas took a de-
cision from the Phi Sigma Sigma's
the same day. Alpha Omicron Phi
defaulted to Sorosis.
FROSH BOXERS CALLED
All freshman boxers are asked to
report for regular class at 3:30 today
to Vernon Larsen at Waterman Gym-
nasium. All men who do not re-
port will be dropped from the squad.
MICHIGAN
vs. CHICAGO
Round TripG
to Chicago. . . .1
Follow your teat to the big
game, by Greyhoun.1 Bus. Con.
genial crowd-comfortable, cush-
ioned chairs -- schedules conve-

$tjaeb' & 7b11
" We Nerve to seve .//gdrn
.309 OUTH MAIN STR~EET
IN THESE NEW
TIMES...
WL 9W OU8 MfNI
The Cheapest Thing
To Buy is ..
QUALITY
-0-
Van Heusen Shirts
Attached or Detached
$1.55 $1.95
HOLEPROOF and
INTERWOVEN
Wool - HOSE - Silk
35c 5c 75c
haney Ak Ties
$1.00 $1.50
GORDEN & FERGUSEN
Cordu oy and Wool
Reefer Coats
Odd Suiting Trousers
All from Suits
Let us match your suit.
$4.95
CLOTHCRAFT
And BALTIMORE
Suits - Topcoats
O'Coats
SUITS, 2 pant,. .$22.50 to $35.00
TOPCOATS ..1. 50tn .150 OO

Make a s.mall deposit and be measured for4
$25.00 Suits, but during the above dates youi
introductory price to our new dealer here.

one of our fine All-Wool Hand-Tailored
pay only $15.00, which is our advertising
A small deposit is all that is required.

The California Tailers have found ONE SATISFIED customer brings in TEN future
orders.
Your Opportunity
to be one and obtain the BEST SUIT OF CLOTHES you have ever had at',

Less Than Cost of Material

You are cordially invited to view our display of woolens, the wide range of seletions,
the patterns and quality of which will astonish you. No obligation, of course.
GUARANTEE
CALIFORNIA TAILORS guarantees to every customer, upon examining
your clothes should you feel that your suit or overcoat is not well worth
$25.00 or more, you may return them at once and new garments will be
promptly made. Every garment GUARANTEED and TAILORED TO YOUR
INDIVIDUAL MEASURE.
We mean exactly what we say. We stand absolutely back of every
garment. The fit and tailoring must please you. YOJ ARE TO BE THE
JUDGE.
CALIFORNIA TAILORS
STYLED IN HOLLYWOOD
REMEMBER, CALIFORNIA TAILORS GARIENTS ARE FULLY
GUARANTEED
We have no connectionswith any Eastern Concern and every suit is CUT FROM THE
BOLT BY IllAND AND TAILORED TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEASURE BY FINE
EXPERT TAILORS

TAILORED IN HOLLYWOOD!

These wonderful woolens are tailored in Hollywood, California, the style center of the
United States, by the finest custom tailors obtainable. These master craftsmen have
catered to the lsvding stars in the moving picture colony for eighteen years. These
creations are alive with :nap, dash, personality and the ultra in design and mode.
Remember--This Offer Is Good for the
Above Dates Only!

hadquJarters at

These same fine Suits will be $25.00 after Oct. 28. Factory Expert here these days
to Design and Take Your Measurements. We are expanding our business and have
the exclusive on this woolen line.

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