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October 24, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-24

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THE -LMICHIGAN-DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY
Establshed 1890

The concert, to be held in Hill Auditorium this
evening, will begin at 8:15.
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
' ORGAN RECITAL
Discant on the Chorale "Nun freut euch
lieben .............................Ducis
Prelude ........................Clerambault
Toccata per l'Elevazione..........Frescobaldi
Fantasia and Fugue in C-minor........ Bach
Sonata Eroica....................Jongen
Prelude on an Ancient Flemish
M elody ......... .................Gils(41
Pantomime.....................Jepson
Prelude to "The Blessed
Damozel"-.............Debussy-Christian
This p r o, r a m is varied both as to styles,
e composers, and nationalities: French, Belgian,
" Italian, German, and American. Writings of early
- composers as well as literature of modern and
contemporary writers is presented. The Sonata
Eroica is new to this series. The Toccata of
Frescobaldi is of the. s he e r e s t contemplative
beauty. With its surprising turns and twists, the
e Pantomime, by the organist of Yale University,
r is decidedly novel.

11

I.,

Hopwood Poetry'
EDITOR'S NOTE: The two poems printed in this
column Sunday were unfortunately run together as
one poem. The second poem "When the Light Is
Gone" begins with the lines:
and the eyes
seeking the tulips

PLAY PRODUCTION PRESENTS
Uncle Tom' S Cabin

OCTOBER 25,

26' 27,

28

REVIEW OF TWO POEMS
By HERMIONE RiPMAN
By PROF. N. E. NELSON

11

Published every morning except Monday during th
iversity year and Summer Session by the Board i
ntrol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa
n a'I the Big Ten News Service.
zsociated 0 loUgiate 9 rezz
1 933 NATIONAL OEAE1 4E
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS;
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the *us
republication of all news dispatches credited to it c
t otherwise credited in this paper and the local new
bished herein. All rights of republication of speci
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Anni Arbor, Michigan, a
ond class matter. Special rate of postage granted b
ird Assistant Postmaster-General.
ubscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by ail
50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; b

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
SATURDAY MATINEE AT SPECIAL PRICES
BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN

Li
}y
1.i

S. P.
vs 51

A Washington
BYSTANDER
'5-

Offices: Student Publications Bul ding, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2.1214,
Represeio.tatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North' Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL S TAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING DITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR...... .."..:..C. BART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR.....................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR....,.........ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph '. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, 'Dohald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie 'Western.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene,' Burnett B. Levick, David G. Mac-
Donald, S. Proctor McGeachy, Joel P. Newman, John M.
O'Connell, Kenneth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George I.
Quimby, Mitchell Raskin, William R. Reed, Robert S.
Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hammer,
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson; Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Rosalie Resnick, Mary
Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER...........BERNARD '. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
..... .......... CATHERINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward'; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-
iger, Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, Norman Smith, David Wink-
worth.
NIGHT EDITOR: GUY M. WHIPPLE, JR.
Russo-American
Haze Clearing. .
HROUGHOUT this country the re-
action to the coming diplomatic
accord between the communist Union of Soviet
Socialist Republics on the one hand and the "cap-
italist-planning" United States of America on the
other hand has been one of optimism, approval,
and relief. The philosophy expressed in former
Gov. Alfred E. Smith's epigram, "They are there,
aren't they, why not recognize them?" has won
cut at last over Red-baiting senators and repre-
sentatives, the reactionary press, the timidity of
three Presidential Administrations, and the same
horror of radicalism with which, we are informed,
Catherine of Russia regarded the baby American
Republic in the 1790's. At it took an enlightened
Alexander to recognize the United States after the
turn of the Nineteenth Century, so it took an en-
lightened Roosevelt to make the overtures which
will end the present strained and artificial rela-
tions between the two great powers.

By KIRKE SIMPSON

WASHINGTON, Oct. 24.- The immediate tariff
policy of the Roosevelt administration seems,
to be to mark time. Clothed as he is with tariff
powers larger than any ever enjoyed by a White
House predecessor, the President so far has acted
in only a minor case or two or under the flexible
provisions of the tariff act.
. Whether the delay arises from necessity of
awaiting the outcome of NRA efforts or is due
more to unanticipated events, like the London con-
ference stalemate, which impeded progress of the
negotiated tariff idea so prominent in Roosevelt
campaign arguments is entirely clear.
The fact remains that seven months after his
inauguration Mr.Roosevelt has made little use of
his special tariff powers.
THE flexible tariff provision authorizes the Pres-
ident to raise or lower any specific duty rate
by 50 per cent upon recommendation of the tariff
commission. When the national industrial recov-
ery act came along additional powers were granted
to meet fears that any raise in domestic prices
would bring a flood of imports. The President
even may lay an embargo against any importation
that threatens domestic recovery measures. That
is a one-way ticket, however. No additional power
to lower was included.
IMPORTER representatives say the tariff com-
mission is moving slowly. It has been flooded
with requests for studies. There is little indication
that it has forwarded recent recommendations to
the White House in any important case. Even the
plea for a reduction in duties on beer, alleged to be
prohibitive even if it cost foreign brewers nothing
to make it, has produced no results as yet.
MISS KATHERINE C. BLACKBURN, called
"Casey" by White House insiders, got quick
action on her clipping bureau assignment. Within
10 days after she started it down in NRA head-
quarters, a daily digest of what hundreds of
papers were saying about NRA and many other
things was reaching designated administration
desks by noon each day.
The government never has had anything like it
before. Various departments have endeavored to
keep their ears to the ground by surveys of the
press, but not on that scale on which "Casey"
Blackburn's bureau is doing it.
Collegiate Observer

In the first poem, "Gettysburg," Mr. Wilson re-
cords his resentment at the blatant commercial-
izing of a field which was once a holy ground; only
the sunlight is the same now as long ago; the field
itself has been vulgarized. In spite of the mount-
ing rhythm (which lapses in clarity and inevit-
ability in lines seven to thirteen) the feeling is
somewhat pale. Having some likeness in subject
matter and phrasing to E. E. Cummings it lacks
entirely his lustiness. Mr. Wilson expresses a
gentile nausea at what would have made Cum-
mings hopping mad. Mr. Eliot I imagine would
have whipped the crowd with ribald scorn. The
poem adequately says what any imaginative per-
son must feel at seeing the battlefield so dese-
crated. I cannot see that it conveys to the reader
an experience distinguished or valuable enough to
be embodied in verse.
That the second poem is more satisfactory may
indicate Mr. Wilson's present limitations as a poet.
For here the sensitive man recoils from the bur-
den imposed upon him by the world of experience:
Too easily impressed
the heart attains no
indifference -
and desires to be as indifferent to the color, shape,
and sound of things as Night is. The poem is
satisfactory because it is balanced and skillfully
ordered rhythm and phrase. It suggests important
limitations, however, in turning away from the
world for what the reader must feel are insuffi-
cient reasons. Mr. Wilson has some qualities,
technical skill, sensitivity, and clear ordering of
his emotions, which help to constitute a talent.
He may well, in time, develop the sturdiness which
should complement his sensitivity, and he will, I
think, work his way toward a more regular verse
form, which it seems to me would be more appro-
priate for his particular qualities of mind and
imagination.

L

It's a good number to keep in mind.
You'll want it if yoe;
}
LOSTI
a book, or key or fountain pen, theni
if you've by chance

PHONE 6300 FOR RESERVATIONS

'IIIl

2-1214

I

FOUND

4'

a coat, a badge, or hat

Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars definitely
recommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior;
no stars, stay away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
**"DOCTOR BULL"
Doctor Bull.. . ... . ... . ..........Will Rogers
Janet Cardmaker.. .............Vera Allen
May Tupping ................ Marion Nixon
Joe Tupping ................... Howard Lally
Howard Banning.......... Berton Churchill
Mrs. Banning............ . Louise Dresser
Dr. Verney ................... .. Ralph Morgan
Larry Ward.. ................Andy Devine
"Doctor Bull" will have an appeal to the
"home folks"...It's just that way. It's a picture
of the typical country doctor done very well by
Will Rogers. There is some good satire, on the
small American town of today which smacks a
bit of Sinclair Lewis.
Director Ford and author Cozzens somehow for-
got that not so long ago Lionel Barrymore made
quite a success in his picture "Country Doctor".
"Dr. Bull" is too much like Barrymore's show.
But then again we suppose we should be impressed
with the fact that somewhere some one is making
the supreme sacrifice. That is just what Doctor
Bull does when he discovers a typhoid fever epi-
demic slowly spreading over the little town of
Winton; he cures a man of paralysis; tells a col-
lege girl to marry the football player she met at
the house party; starts off a shot-gun wedding
(which for some reason the audience thought was
terribly funny) and then gets married himself.
Everybody gossips in Winton (just as in any
other town) and Doctor Bull is watched as he
courts widow Janet Cardmaker until people try
to pin negligence of his duty as Health Officer on
him and get Doctor Verney, the rich man with a
World's Fair laboratory, to take his place. But
then Janet's swindling brother is exposed as the
creator of the typhoid germ starting in his lum-
ber camp near the Winton water supply. Atten-
tion swings back and forth until Jo Tapping is
made to walk again and Doctor Bull's triumph
over the "withered hags" (Shakespeare) is com-
plete.
Rogers is as ever: witty, bashful, and practical,
chugging about Winton in his old roadster doing
service to the sickly and poor. Rochelle Hudson
(who looks like a college girl)), Louise Dresser
(who makes a good stubborn, conceited lady),
Vera Allen (who has a rather young voice for her
age), Ralph Morgan (whose clothes don't fit as
well as his brother Frank's), Iarion Nixon (who
sems to improve a little with each picture), and
Andy Devine (who should find himself another
voice or else gargle a bit) support politician Rog-
ers in this quaint, but fresh sketch of "Doctor
Bull."
In the Paramount News there are poor pictures
of the Michigan-Ohio game (jerky, no sound, and
too fast). Ted Healy and his three mischievous
sons try a little humor in an M-G-M musical
novelty, while Grantland Rice's "Water Lure" is
interesting if you enjoy back flips, Coney Island,
and Eleanor Holm's swimming.0

2-12141
will help to find the owner. But that
isn't all. If you would like to
RENT
a room, or have one rented, t e
same little number will do it. A lot
of other things too . try it
MCY-LASSIFI DSI

'F '.
-.5':

N

Phone 2-1214

II1I

DI. SERGE KOUSSEVIFZKY, conductor
110 PLAYERS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24
8:15 Sharp

ry I YrI\
a

On the economic front we-find a strong approval
>f recognition. Peter A. Bogdonov. in particuler1
has cause to exult. The bearded chief of the ex-
;ensively-outfitted A m t o r g, n o n-CommunistI
Soviet trading organization in the United States,
now sees an opportunity to regain the ground be
ost during the great depression, which clamped
lown with abnormal severity on his concern.
Conservative estimates show that the Amtorg,
holder of an airtight monopoly on United States
exports to Russia, will be the recipient of trade
extending well into the hundred millions of dol-
lars. Bogdanov will, be able to rehire the huge
clerical force he was forced to discharge in the
more trying economic period now happily in the
past and the Amtorg's huge New York offices will
once again bustle to the click of the American
dollar.
And it will not be a one-way road-- this road
back to a measure of prosperity through the med-
ium of trade with the Red state. American bank-
ers, traders, mill-men, commercialists of every de-
scription, even the American farmer, for so long
a time downtrodden, are expected to benefit. The
truly tragic surpluses of every kind of goods in ,the
United States will have an outlet to a huge coun-
try which is thirsty for consumers' articles.
If Maxim Litvinoff agrees to the demands which
will be pressed upon him when he comes to Wash-
ington, the official establishment of recognition
will ensue., Those who think with their heads
rather than their feet, those who reflect rather
than declaim,.will conclude that recognition will
be beneficial to this country, and that recognition
does not mean Roosevelt has "sold us out to the
Reds."

By BUD BERNARD
Tulane University's handsomest and best dress-
ed. men have former a gigolo club to keep their
co-eds in dates. The rates of the club are as fol-
lows: $2 for a formal dance; and $1 for an in-
formal dance. The men claim that they save a
lot of time by not calling up the women and try-
ing to get dates. The club takes care of all the
details.
And then from Southern Methodist University
we find that co-eds have formed a "perfect date"
club to which the most attractive girls on the
campus belong.
A new expression has been added to the
collegiate wordbook of slang. "Boy she's
stacked!" is the precise way in which it is
used. Translated from American into Eng-
lish, to be stacked means to possess a beau-
tiful figure.
The Colorado State Teachers College newspaper
has found another way of playing with dynamite
- it's sponsoring a contest among the students to
select the best liked faculty member.
* * * :
During a psychology lecture, at the Univer-
sity of Mississippi, the professor was explain-
ing the high development of an animal's'sense
of smell. "Animals smell better than me", he
asserted. A student, not being able to control
himself, yelled out, "Professor, have you ever
lived near a goat?"
* * *

Program
"EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSIK" Serenade...... . . .
for String Orchestra (Koechel No. 525)
1. Allegro III. Menutto; Allegre

Mozart

tto

II. Romanza

IV.

Rondo: Allegro

"LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS"
A Picture of Pagan Russia

( The ie of Spring") Stravinsky

I. The Adoration of the Earth
Introduction - Harbingers ,of Spring:- Dance, of the
Adolescents - Abduction - Spring Rounds - 4anes of
the Rival Cities - The Procession of the Wise Xn
The Adoration of the Earth (The Wise lan) - Dance
of the Earth.
II. The Sacrfice
Introduction - Mysterious Circles of the Adolescents -
Glorification of the Chosen One - Evocation of , the
Ancestors - Ritual of the Ancestors - The Sacrificial
Dance of the Chosen One.
SYMPHONY No. i in C MINOR, Op. 68....B.. ... .Brahms
I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro II. Andante sostenuto
III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso
IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio

-R.E.L.

By way of soothing his troublesome conscience
an alumnus of the University of California re-
turned to the Berkley campus recently to return
25 cents to the co-op store cashier, the amount

I

bad manager; if he is rich he is dishonest. If
he needs credit, he can't get it; if he is prosper-

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