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October 11, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

U- G I I ll x AN Or ENTPU&IAORQN( N , .amI4 lmM
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member ofthe Westerns Conference Editorial Associa-
tion a-i the Big Ten News Service.
0506 #¢d f Ott g te ie5
k933 ^"*"o '.. c ^o k 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.' Phone: 21214
Representatives College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 Est Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 1orth Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL SAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ........... THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR...............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR....:...... ........... BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR........... ...:.ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
1iam G0.Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marli Murphy,rMargaret PhalanMarjorie
Beck.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Caspar S. Early, Thomas Groehn, Robert
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Manuel Levin, Irving
F. Levitt, David G. MacDonald, S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell, George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph Shapiro, Marshall D.
Silverman, L. Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies,
Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Marie Heid, Margaret
Hiscock, Eleanor Johnson, Hilda Laine, Kathleen Mac-
Intyre, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Mary'
O'Neill, Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER.............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
........................... CATHERINE MC HENRY,
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert'
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Willard Cohodas, Van
Dunakin, Carl Fibiger, Milton Kramer, John Mason,
John Marks, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe
Rothbard, Richard Schiff, Robert Trimby, George Wil-
liams, David Winkworth.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1933;
Fraternity
Scholarship.-.
F RATERNITIES have successfully,
passed what may have been a
crisis. The increased pledge classes this year will
enable many houses to stay on campus that other-
wise would have had to withdraw. Financially,r
the outlook is reassuring.-
There is, of course, another aspect of fraternity'
life. In discussing fraternity scholarship, it is
customary to say that the fraternity average is
higher than the independent average and there
let the matter drop. But a more detailed consid-
eration of this subject points to a less attractive
conclusion.
A comparison of the scholarship ratings of the
houses that were forced off the campus last year
by financial stress, shows that almost without ex-
ception they had high scholastic standings. The
value of good scholarship is manifestly absent in
the difficulties which these houses had in at-
tracting pledges - the life-blood of a fraternity.
Another comparison, even more eloquent in
demonstrating the fraternity shortcoming in the
academic direction is furnished by a glance at the
scholarship standings of the so-called leading"
houses on campus. Almost without exception they'
are near the bottom of the list.
Now no friend of the fraternity system can'
deny that it would be a regrettable thing if com-
paratively low scholarship had to go with com-
paratively high social success. To admit this
would be to admit that a university is a sort of
pleasure resort which is encumbered by a set of
gray-beards whose only function is to 'organize
opposition to keep the patrons from enjoying'
themselves. Yet scholastic statistics point to the
conclusion that this is just what many organized
men conceive the university to be.
With the new regulation requiring all fresh-

man women to live indormitories, and with fra-
ternity pledgingimore closelyr watched by the
dean's office than ever before, it cannot be denied
that the fraternity system is in a degree on trial.
It has been abolished in other schools, and its
abolition might be considered here. If this came
to pass, the decision in the matter would almost
certainly turn on scholarship. So fraternity men
may well look to their laurels.

by Clarence Mader, organist of Immanuel Pres
byterian Church, Los Angeles, California. Mr.
Mader is giving a few concerts on his way from
the East, where he has been playing this sum-
mer, to California. He is among the small num-
ber of American organists who have achieved
some distinction, and who have been invited by
Mr. Christian in preference to foreign organists
to play at Hill Auditorium. In the five years since
the installation of the new organ, there have been
only two organists from abroad, in comparison to
six or eight Americans. Mr. Mader is the fourth
Californian.
Mr. Mader's program covers interesting por-
tions of organ literature, containing works of
Widor, Rameau, and Reger. Two works of Bach,
Choral and Variations, and Two Choral Preludes
occupy the central position. Mr. Mader will in-
elude one of a set of five compositions, still in
manuscript, written by the organist of Pomona
College, California. He will close the programs
with an entertaining composition of his own, The
Miracle of the Toad.
Screen Reflections
COMING TO MAJESTIC TODAY -
HENRIETTA CROSMAN IN "PILGRIMAGE"
A mother who drops the memory of her son
from her life, sending him to war because she
wants to keep him for herself, is the idea around
which is built the Fox film "Pilgrimage", starring
Henrietta Crosman. It opens at the Majestic to-
day for a three-day run.
It is said to be a powerful story, lighted with
deft and human touches of comedy. The produc-
ers claim it has the intimate flair of "State Fair",
the magnitude of human drama that character-
ized "Cavalcade," and an idea new to motion pic-
tures behind it. It strikes at the eternal struggle
between mother and sweetheart for a boy's love.
In addition to. Henrietta Crosman, the cast
contains Heather Angel, Marian Nixon, Norman
Foster, Charles Grapewin, and Hedda Hopper.
- G. M. W. Jr.
COMING TO WHITNEY TODAY -
"WHEN STRANGERS MARRY"
What happens when a spoiled heiress marries
a handsome engineer during a drunken brawl in
Paris and then spends her honeymoon alone in
Java is the central theme of "When Strangers
Marry", the new Columbia picture starring Jack
Holt which opens at the Whitney today for a
three-day run.
Holt, as Steve Rand, engineer and adventurer,
meets Marian Drake (Lillian Bond), high-spirited
young American, during a farewell-to-civilization
party in Paris. They realize a mutual attraction,
and come to their sober senses later to discover
they are man and wife. Despite Marian's plead-
ings Steve refuses to abandon his contract to
finish a railroad in Java and only against his
wishes consents to take his wife with him into the
jungle. Marian, left alone while Steve is working
on his project, turns to Hinkle (Arthur Vinton),
a scheming American, for solace. Marian's dis-
covery of Hinkle's treachery brings on the crisis,
after she has forced Steve to return to the jungle
knowing she has betrayed him.
Others in the cast are Gustav von Seyffertitz,
Ward Bond, Barbara Barondess, and Paul Forcasi.

THE
SPOTLIGHT
By LARRY KING
THE new rhythmic expression group got under
way yesterday morning in Barbour Gym
under the direction of Jay Pozz, Play Production
prodigy, who was wearing a very chic bathing
suit. The boys advance rhythmically in a line
holding hands, pause, 'look up registering some
emotion and then on the next beat drop into
a pose symbolic of emotion. It's really most ef-
fective.
The Phi Kappa house was entertaining
for freshmen the other night when an un-
expected rushee turned up. The bewildered
brothers introduced him around and then the
"freshman" passed cards around, announced
that he was a barber, and started soliciting.
AN advertisement in the Oregon Daily Barome-
ter: "Join the crusade against 'pretty pants.'
Assert your masculinity - wear Campus Cords.
Tricky corduroys may go great guns with the
dance hall boys - but not with university men.
The favorite on practically every major campus
is the distinctive, conservative trouser called Cam-
pus Cords. Its snug hip fit and straight hang
'click'm With even the most critical university
men."
* * *
Most of you have seen Edna St. Vincent
Millay's poem:
My candle's burning at both ends,
It will not last the night.
But, ah, my foes and oh, my friends,
It gives a lovely light.
And here is an anonymous sequel:
I burn my candle at both ends,
Now I have neither foes nor friends.
For all the rosy light begotten
I'm paying now and feeling rotten.

I

MICHIGAN BELL.
TELEPHONE CO.

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RESULTS

1,

The Theatre

HENDERSON AT DETROIT CASS,
"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING"
A REVIEW -
Cast of Characters:
Beatrice..............Violet Kemble-Cooper
Benedick...................... Rollo Peters
Hero...........................Sylvia Field
Claudio.........................Lester Vail
Don Pedro.......... .....Ainsworth Arnold
Don John..................Charles Brokaw
Leonato......................Eugene Weber
Dogberry................. Robert Henderson
Verges................... Edwin Grammercy
Productions in the grand style are meat and
drink to Mr. Henderson, and, when he is doing
the producing, equally acceptable to playgoers.
Mr. Henderson probably came very close to ex-
ceeding himself Monday night in his staging of
this gem among the Essence of Avon's romantic
comedies. He strove hard to bring back to the
modern stage all the colorful musical glamor of
the Elisabethan Italianate romance, and (except
for the slightly disconcerting presence of modern
haircuts among the gentlemen of the cast) he was
wholly successful.
The play was one of those lovely things that
critics often have pleasant dreams about, but ar&-
not always fortunate enough to see in the flesh.
Music and dancing were carefully and har-
moniously blended into the action, and lighting
effects were utilized to their best advantage. The
names of the principles, of course, are almost suf-
ficient to insure good acting; but here again an
amiable tendency of Mr. Henderson's was highly
apparent - that of seeing that the members of
the background cast did capable filling jobs, with-
out too high a degree either of woodenness or of
individual "mugging" for attention.
It was an attempt to present Shakespeare as
Shakespeare would have demanded had he lived
in this day of elaborate staging possibilities. This
reviewer believes that the effort, for the most
part, was successful.
Miss Cooper and Mr. Peters were delightfully
co-starred. To the deft Mr. Peters must go the
credit for what, in an inferior production, would
be a one-man job of making a play a success. He
has a rather rare quality of being human and
projecting that humanness across the footlights.
There is just a suspicion in our mind that Miss
Cooper was miscast as Beatrice: the Beatrice of
Shakespeare had a wit and a charm that crackled,
whereas those elements in Miss Cooper's heroine
were devastating rather than peppery. Miss

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
The co-eds at Wheaton have a novel idea.
They propose that each sorority help balance
its budget by installing a system of lounging
fees for the more regular gentlemen callers
But what would be the effect of this on rom-
ance?
Personality not brains is the reason for a girl's
success, a profesor of psychology at Witchitas
University believes. "Psychology has determined
by actual experience that success depends 85 per-
cent upon personality, and 15 percent upon brains,"
he states.
Law students at the University of South Dakota
have issued a proclamation that they plan to at-
tend open house parties of the sororities on the
campus. They are the first group to do this for
the past 25 years. It will probably take an extrad-
ition case to get some of them out of certain sor-
ority houses on time.
Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, strange. as
it may seem, has drawn more than one-third of
its new freshman class from California. Accord-
ing to statistics recently compiled, the enroll-
ment includes 36 percent of the class from Cal-
ifornia, 21 percent from New York, 9 percent
from New Jersey, and the remaining 34 percent
from 19 states.
At the University of Maryland students
are subject to a $3 fine for every unexcused
absence.
FROM OUR CONTEMPORARIES
One of the best ways to distinguish a freshman
from an upperclassman, since the gentlemen of
the first year rarely wear the "pot", is observa-
tion that the freshman will often run to avoid
being late to class.
--Purdue Exponent
"And then there was the freshman who
wouldn't go into the Union Building because
his grandfather was a general in the con-
federate army.
-The Daily Texan
A student with a flair for statistics has figured
out that it would require 1,895 credit hours, ap-
proximately 101 semesters or 50 years, to com-
plete all of the undergraduate courses listed in
the fall announcement ofathe University of Illi-
nois, exclusive of R.O.T.C. and Physical Education.

LLLI

DAY
(4:30 a.r.-
7:00 p.m.)
Bay City.........$ .70
Big Rapids............90
Chicago ............1.05
Detroit ............. .30
Grand Rapids ........80
Hillsdale ........... .45
Kalamazoo............70
Lansing..............45
Marquette...........1.80
Mt. Clemens...... ...45
New York ..........2.15
Port Huron...........60
Saginaw .............60

EVENING.
(7:00 p.m.-
8:30 p.m.)
$5 .55
.70
.90
.30
.60
.35
.55
.35
1.35
.35
1.80
.45
.45

NIGHT
(8:30p.m.-
4:30 a.m.)
$ .35
.45
.60
.30
.40
.35
.35
.35
.90
.35
1.20
.35
.35

(On a call costing 30c or more, a federal ta applies)

BARGAIN HOURS
for
wT
TELEPHONING HOME
At 7 o'clock in the evening, and again at 8:30 p.n.,
substantial reductions in Station-to-Station bong dis-
tance telephone rates become effective, offering un-
usual savingsp on your telephone calls homes
Station-to-Station rates for three-minute calls from
Ann Arbor to representative points are shown
below.

-_ ,,

i .
i
i

I

ridiculousness adds greatly to the performance.
Mr. Grammercy does a nice job of stooging.
Some indignation was aroused in the mind of
this reviewer by the work of Mr. Arnold, who
should have known better. Don Pedro, as Shakes-
peare wrote him, was a prince with a flair for
whimsy; as Mr. Arnold reads him, he sometimes
becomes almost clownish. A representative con-
versation between him and Mr. Weber, who, as
Leonato, did practically nothing with a meagre
role:
D. Pedro. "I will in the interim (inhaling) un-
dertaker one of Hercules' labors (inhaling);
which is to bring Signor Benedick (inhaling) and
the Lady Beatrice (inhaling) into a mountain of
affection (inhaling) the one with the other (lout-
ing low)."
Leon. "My lord, I am for you (slight shaking
of shoulders), though it cost me ten nights'
watchings (drawing self to full height and
glaring)."
Don John, played by Mr. Brokaw, endeared
himself to the audience when he stepped to the
fore and avowed himself a villain - and made the
soliloquy convincing, against all the rules of mod-

The Deadline for Senior Pictures
Has Been Set..
DECEMBER 15th
First-Come to the Press Building and Pur-
chase Your Photographer's Receipt at the Press
Building or at the Office of an Officia Michi-
ganensian Photographer, $3.00.

i I

Then -Make

an Appointment with one of

these Official Michig anensian ;Photographers.

Musical Events

4

ORGAN RECITAL.
Finale from Symphony eight.. .......Widor
Weihnachten .....................Reger
Bell Prelude................. .....Clokey
Rigaudon.......................Rameau
Choral and Variations: 0 Christ,
who art the light of day......... Bach

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