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October 11, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iipke Says

Wolverines Overrated; Predicts Michigan Defec

(.)

i

PLAY &
BY-PLAY

-By AL NEWMAN-

Football
*

Consensus . .
* *

THE CONSENSUS was not so good
this week. Exclusive of ties, the
junior staff picked four losers in
twenty-six games, and totalling this
week's results into last week's we find
that it is just .865 correct. However,
I have decided not to fire anybody,
although if I were a football coach
with a team which showed up as
poorly as that, you could probably
hear me bellowing clear to Kalama-
zoo.
Roland Martin leads in the totals
with just four errors so far, with
Chuck Baird and Don Bird following
with five each. Sid Frankel has six,
and Art Carstens is low man with
seven.
QUESTION: Will you please ex-
plain what a safety man is on a
football team?
It would be a favor for many peo-
ple if you could print a list of Michi-
gan football men and their numbers
before the games.
Answer: The safety man on a foot-
ball team is a term applied to that
member of the backfield of the de-
fensive team whose position is near-
est the goal. It is his duty to catch
and run back punts, if possible, and
he is the last outpost of defense if
the ball-carrier clears the line of
scrimmage and the secondary de-
fense. On fourth down, with con-
siderable yardage to gain, the offen-
sive team usually relinquishes the of-
fense by punting and then you will
usually find two safety-men employ-
ed. One will catch the punt and the
other will block for him.
The list to which you refer is copy-
righted and .may not be released in
newspapers.
ANY FURTHER QUESTIONS and
comments upon this column will
be gratefully received. Especially de-
sired are comments upon the differ-
ent types of material which have ap-
peared in it. \ Please address these
communications to Al Newman, Stu-
dent Pub. Bldg., Ann Arbor. By pop-
ular request, my gangster friend
Mike will probably write to his lady-
friend again tomorrow.
How Big Is Da Preem?
Here Are The Figures
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -(R)-Now
it can be told - just how big a
person this Primo Carnera, new
world heavyweight boxing cham-
pion, really is.
A shirt company here received
a huge shirt order from the vast
Venetian, and here are the speci-
fications:
Neckband, 19 /inches; sleeves,
37 inches; chest, 58 inches;
length, 41 inches; cuffs, 13%
inches.

Kipke Sends
Squad Through
Offensive Drill
Backs Work On Passing;
Reserves Play Frosh In
Regulation Scrimmage
Passes featured the Wolverine foot-
ball practice yesterday as Coach
Harry Kikpe put his Varsity squad
through a hard offense workout
against a freshman team which used
Cornell defense tactics.
The passing was not confined to
any few members of the squad, for
every back on the Varsity took part
in heaving the ball, with the excep-
tions of Captain Fay and Jack Hes-
ton.
Bill Renner, Estil Tessmer, and
Herm Everhardus looked the best on
the throwing ends with Ted Pesoskey
and Jack Heston making some very
pretty catches.
The quarterback problem still con-
fronts Coach Kipke and he still is in
a dilemma as to who will start for
the Wolverines against the Big Red
team this Saturday. In the practice
yesterday, Captain Fay alternated at
callng the signals with Bill Renner
and Estil Tessmer, the latter doing a
good job of it.
Tessmer's stock, according to the
side line coaches, has gone up con-
siderably since last Saturday's game,
chiefly because of Renner's inability
to get going. Tessmer is a capable
passer, a good kicker andauconser-
vative field general, but just where
he would work into the jumbled sit-
uation that is the picture now is far
from certain, however.
While Kipke was putting his first
string squad through its offensive
drill Coach Cappon was sending the
reserve squad against a frosh team
on Ferry Field. With Malesavich and
Johnson at ends, McGuire and Jacob-
son at tackles and Beard and Ponto
at the guards with Fuog at center
the freshmen ripped off considerable
gains through the Reserve's line.
Cornell-Michigan Game
Will Rnew Old Rivalry
NEW YORK, Oct. 10 - (P) -- Cor-
nell's trip to Ann Arbor to face Mich-
igan Saturday renews one of the
oldest, as well as one of the most
interesting of football rivalries.
The Red and White first met
Michigan in 1889, the second year
Cornell played intercollegiate foot-
ball. The easterners won that con-
test, 66-0, and then added four more
victories before Michigan broke
through to win, 12-4, in the second
of two games these rivals played in
1894.
Relations were suspended then un-
til 1911 when the teams began an
annual series that lasted through the
next seven years, Cornell winning
four games, the Wolverines three.
Saturday's game which Michigan's
Big Ten champions will be favored
to win, will be their first meeting
since 1917.

'M' Coach Says
Team Will Have
No Easy Games
Mentor Delivers Weekly
Report At Meeting Of
Curbstone Coach Club
Competition Tough
Praises Playing Of Fay,
Everhardus, Petoskey In
Saturday's Game
"Others say that Michigan has a
great football team. I say that Mich-
igan is much overrated," was the
startling prediction that Coach Har-
ry Kipke made before a group of
Michigan alumni in Detroit Mon-
day.
"I honestly do not see how Michi-
gan can go through the season un-
defeated. I do not know what team
or teams will beat us, but I am sure
that the Western Conference will
provide stronger competition than we
had last year," said the coach before
what Cy Huston calls the Detroit
chapter of the National Drug Store
and Curbstone Coaches Association.
No Set-ups
Kipke pointed out that both Iowa
and Chicago, who were supposed to
furnish breathers for his team, have
displayed surprising strength this
season and will have to be regarded
as dangerous opponents.
In discussing the showings of his
individual players Kipke said:
That Louis Westover is the best
blocker on the squad to date.
That Herman Everhardus and
Jack Heston are the two best run-
ning backs.
That Ted Petoskey is one of the
most vicious tacklers in football and
"one of the best ends I ever saw."
That Russ Oliver has improved as
much as any other player.
That Tessmer, who has not had
much of a chance to show his worth,
may get that chance "soon."
That Stan-Fay
"delighted me by
the way he hand-
"s led the quarter-
back job while he
was in the synpe
.7:' >. against Michigan
State."
That Bill Ren-
ner should be ex-
cused if his per-
formance Satur-
day did not meas-
ure up to the en-
thusiastic expectations of some of
the Wolverine supporters.
Speaking of Everhardus' work,
Kipke said he was highly pleased
with the senior half's two touch-..
downs Saturday. He said, "The trou-
ble with Everhardus was that he al-
ways had an inferiority complex. I
knew he'd improve when he came
out for practice this fall and Satur-
day he showed me that he has the
old bugaboo licked. He ran and
blocked better than ever before and
had more confidence than I have
ever seen him display. He and Hes-
ton are likely to end up with a great
reputation as a team of running
backs."
Names Starting Backs
Kipke added that the four men
who will probably compose the Yel-
low and Blue's starting backfield for
this fall's games are Fay, Regeczi,
Everhardus and Heston.
Coach Charlie Bachmann, Michi-
gan State mentor, was loud in his
praise of Regeezi's punting against

the Spartans Saturday. He is quoted
as saying, "Talk about your Ber-
nard's, Petoskey's, and Ward's. Well,
just give me that boy Regeczi. He's
Michigan's candidate for All-Ameri-
can honors, I think."

Enters Pro Ranks

Four Harriers
Tie In Cross
Country Trials
Hoyt Still Requires Ken
Doherty's Assistance In
Handling Of Squad
Coach Charlie Hoyt is back with
his cross country squad again, but
Ken Doherty is still assisting him in
the active training of the men for
the first meet with Michigan State
on October 21.
A time trial was conducted by the
coaches last Friday, with four men
finishing in a dead heat for first in
a slow race. Capt. Ostrander, Har-
vey Smith, Dick McManus, and Jack
Charles were the quartet of winners.
Ostrander and McManus are senior
members of the squad, Horace Clark
and Hoyt Servis are juniors, Servis
a newcomer, Smith and Paul Gor-
man, are sophomores who have come
up from the frosh squad of last
year.

Speedball Schedule
Will Get Under Way
The inter-fraternity s p e e d b a 11
schedule will open at 4:15 p. m. to-
day, with A. K. L., title holder for
the past four years, meeting the
Dekes.
Twenty-four teams are competing
in the leaguethis year in fivesepa-
rate groups. After playing four
games, the various group winners
will engage in a round robin series
for the championship.
The independent program begins
October 18, with 12 teams in touch
football competition.
Speedball Today
4:15-Alpha Kappa Lambda vs.
Delta Kappa Epsilon; Tau Kappa
Epsilon vs. Alpha Tau Omega.
5:15-Sigma Nu vs. Theta Xi; Phi
Beta Delta vs. Phi Gamma Delta;
Lambda Chi Alpha vs. Theta Chi.

AM AVANT arg w ar .A
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FRANK OAKES " Mgr.

READ THE DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADS

*7 1,5.0

j .ga ....JN y.i5

NEW YORK, Oct. 10-(P)-Ells-
worth Vines finally has taken the
plunge into professional tennis.
Hard on the heels of the most dis-
astrous season of his comparatively
brief career, the 22-year-old Pasade-1
na youngster has signed a one-year
contract with Big Bill Tilden on
terms Tilden declines to discuss, but
which possibly will net Vines about
$25,000 for 1934.
The tall Californian, amateur
champion of the United States in
1931 and 1932, and Wimbledon title-
holder in 1932, will make his pro-
fessional debut in a match with Til-
den in Madison Square Garden Jan.
10.
Then will follow a short tour to
the Pacific Coast and back, after
which Tilden and Vines will engage
in a series of nine contests, along
Davis Cup lines, against Henri Co-
chet and Martin Plaa, of France. The
first of these will be played in the
Garden the middle of February.
Bill Explains Flop
Although Vines was beaten in ev-
ery one of his major tests during the
campaign just closed, Tilden is con-
fident the youngster quickly will re-
gain the form that made him a sen-
sation in 1931 and 1932.
"The trouble with Vines this year,"
said Big Bill, "was not that he was
losing his skill as a player but that
his game was affected by too much
pressure, wiht too many officials try-
ing to tell him what to do to bring
back the Davis Cup. I know be-
cause I went through the same mill,
over a much longer period, and won
many of my matches despite official
interference and suggestions."
While he was at it, Tilden exhibit-
ed a written statement from Vines,
dated at Pasadena several days ago:
"Gosh, I'm glad I turned pro," the
statement read. "Why did I slip
last season? I wasn't slipping. I
was dead, killed by too much tennis
and too many officials. All I needed
was a little rest and to be let alone
to play tennis my way."

THE MICHIGAN DAI LY

11

Howell but Of First Meet
Rod Howell, a junior and last
year's veteran, has returned to prac-
tice for the first time since his ten-
day illness. He probably will not be
in condition for the first meet, but
Rod is expected to be among the
first five on the team when he does
get back in shape.
The regular practice run of the
team is three miles, leading around
the golf course and ending on Ferry
Field. There will be another time
trial over a two and one-half mile
course Friday afternoon and from
that Coach Hoyt expects to get some
definite idea of the capacities of his
men.

for

AN OFFICIAL RECORD
OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY

$4.25 MA I LED

Women's Volleyball And
Hockey Will Start Today
The first meetings of the Intra-
mural hockey and volleyball teams
will be in the form of practices start-
ing today. Twenty-eight teams have
signed up for participation in the
hockey title races, and eighteen will
compete for the newly introduced
volleyball championship tournament.
A FULL QUART - 32 OZ. FOR 15c
(Plus 5c Bottle Deposit)
INSIST' ON
CAVALIER
PALE DRY GINGER ALE
and LIME RICKEY
SOLD AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE
HARNESS RACES
October11 and 12
ANN ARBOR
FAIRGROUNDS
Illuminated Track
FIRST RACE AT 7:45 P.M.
Admission Free
35c Parking

Allr/~
'IlYI

Representative JERRY COAN
at THE CAMPUS BOOTERY
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19th

I

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Presenting for Fal
-a noteworthy collection of new
importations .. .set apart from the
commonplace by the individuality

of their design.

This concern has

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tailored the clothes of two genera-
tions of college men.

EEEii :

ENJOY THE
. REFRESHING ATMOSPHERE
. AND EXCELLENT FOOD OF
THIS MODERN RESTAURANT

Fischer Led In Campus.
Tourney With 289 Total
Johnny Fischer, captain of the
Michigan golf team won the first fall
tournament held last week end with
a medal score of 289 for the 72 holes.
This is an average of 72 strokes per
round, good golf for the University
course.
He was followed by L. David with
303, Ed Dayton 308, G. David 310,
Alex Jolly 315, Schloss 316, Green-
street 331, Gross 332, Pratt 332, Van
Zile 338, Williams 360 and Moser 369.

:---- I

LUNCHEONS.. 30c Up

C . AILORHS
1014 CHAPEL ST., NEW HAVEN 16 EAST 52nd SC., NEW ;YORK

DINNERS.. 30c Up

TONIGHT WE SERVE A SPECIAL FULL COURSE
T-BONE STEAK DINNER, FOR ONLY .. 40c

THE PACKARD CAFE

$5.50 MEAL TICKETS . . $5.00
632 Packard Street

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Get aboard the
GUNBOAT

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w7Ie Serve to Serve ca'qciv"
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN

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At State

WarningI

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If You Buy Here

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NO NEED TO PAY
AN ENORMOUS PRICE
FOR THAT NEW
FALL SUIT-
No High Rents
attached to our prices
We own our own building

If you are not at Granger 's
Ballroom this Friday and Sat-
urday evenings, to hear BER-
NIE HANEY and his famous
orchestra, then you are going
to miss one of the finest bands
that played during A Century
of Progress. This merry-mad
gang from the Streets of Paris
has set more royal and colle-
giate feet in motion than
Mickey the Mouse.
BERNIE HANEY is coming
direct from World's Fair en-
gagements at the Club Black-
hawk, The Oasis, The Light-
house and Hotel Golfmore.
Dance to this wonderful band
on both Friday and Saturday
evenings, from 9:00 until 12:00.

You Save

1, 1

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We're always ahead
The man who makes this his clothing
store takes no chances. He's safe every trip -
and it's "safety first," these days.
Our stock is now complete with your
Fall wants in both clothing and furnishings.
Below are listed just a few of the many things
you'll need:

Michaels Stern
Fine Suits

$25

-$30

Single or Double Breasted
in all the new shades

0 Shove off into winter in this smart
rugged Walk-Over. Comfort carved
out of Scotch grain, meaty and mel-
low. Triple, flexible soles... oil-treated
for rough weather and hard wear.
Easy-going Duncan last. The kind
of shoe most men can't do without.

Corduroy Coats, Blue Wool Re
Suede Jackets, Blue Wool Jackets, Swe
Sweat shirts crew and collar neck, Paj
r' ,y I NT

'efers,
eaters,
amas,

ii I

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