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October 09, 1932 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-09

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SUNDAY, OCT. 9, 1932'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Griffiths Names
Cronin As Pilot
For Washington
26 -Year - Old Shortstop
Gets One-Year Contract
As Senator Manager
Succeeds Johnson
He Is Youngest Player
Ever To Head A Major
League Baseball Team
WASHINGTON, Oct. 8. - (P) -
Young Joe Cronin, brilliant short-
stop who will not be 26 until Wed-
nesday, is the new manager of the
Washington Senators.
Harking back, perhaps, to the time
in 1924 when another youthful in-
fielder, "Buky" Harris, led his team
to a world championship, Clark Grif-
fith, owner of the Washington Club,
today announced Cronin's appoint-'
ment.
Cronin, who succeeds Walter John-
son, was given a one-year contract.
He is the youngest man ever named
to head a major league baseball club
and in addition is the youngest of the
players who were regulars with the
Washington Club last season.
Jumped From High School
A native of San Francisco, Cronin
went from high school to league
baseball. Before he was 19 he had
been picked up by the Pittsburgh
Pirates and was sitting on the bench
during the World Series of that year
with Washington. He saw his team
hammer Johnson, the "Big Train,"
hard to win the deciding game.
Sent to the minors for further sea-
sohing, Cronin was with Kansas City
in 1928 where Joe Engel, scout of the
Washington Club, saw him. Engel
decided that he was a fine fielder
but an ordinary hitter. He recom-
mended, however, that the Senators
buy him. The purchase price was
never announced but it was small.
Cronin hit only .243 in 63 games
in 1928, but the next year he began
to find the range for big league
pitching and boosted his mark to
.282.
Big Season in 1930
Since then he has been a consist-
ent .300 hitter. His mark was .346
in 1930, the year he was voted the
most valuable player in the league.
He dropped to .306 in 1931 and rote
to a .321 average the past season,
driving in 120 runs. He is a right
handed hitter and many of his blows
are for extra bases.
During the absence of Joe Judge,
first baseman, for most of the past
season, Cronin was an aggresive field
leader.
He remained in Washington after
the season closed to have his ton-
sils removed but will leave for San
Francisco in a few days.
Michigan State
Triumphs Over
Grinnell, 27-6
EAST LANSING, Oct. 8-Showing
signs of having shaken the lethargy
that has gripped the team for the
past 10 or 12 days, Michigan State
defeated Grinnell College, 27 to 6,
here this afternoon.
The Spartans mixed a hard run-
ning attack with some neat forward
passing to, accomplish the downfall
of the Pioneers. They scored two
touchdowns in the first period.
With the passing attack working
perfectly, State again pushed to the

Pioneer's goal in the second half. A
pass, Kircher to Monnett, put the
ball in scoring position, and after
three plunges Eliowitz carried it over.
A pass later in the period took the
ball over for the only Grinnell tally
of the game.
Near the end of the game, after
working the ball down to Grinnell's
13-yard line on straight line bucks,
Jones, substituting for M o n n e t t,
tossed an 18-yard forward pass to
Armstrong for the final scoring of
the contest.

Stars As Michigan Conquers Northwestern

a

.:
-I

Em

luckeyes Tie
With Indiana,

Demonstrating his ability as a successor to Maynard Morrison,
Michigan's 1931 All American, Charles Bernard, Varsity center, was
outstanding on both offense and defense in yesterday's 15-6 victory
over Northwestern.

Wolverines Defeat
Northwestern, 15-6;
55,000 See G ame
(Continued from Page 1)
covered it himself, and elected to
place kick. He missed, and the ball
was brought out to the 20-yardd line,
as the missed kick made it a touch-
back.
Olson then kicked a 13-yard punt
to his 33, one of his poorest for the
day. Newman tried three passes, all
incomplete, and the half ended just
as Petoskey ° intercepted Rentner's
pass on 50-yard line and brought it
back to the 30.
In the third quarter, Newman's
sensational runback of Olson's punt,
from Northwestern's 37-yard line to
the eight, Where he was forced out of
bounds, .started a Michigan drive.
After he had gone out of bounds,
Newman made two through the line,
and Riley, big tackle, caught Fay
behind the line of scrimmage for a
four-yard loss. Newman made a suc-
cessful place kick from the 15-yard
lipe, concluding the scoring, 15-6.
Northwestern threatened the Wol-
verines-once in the fourth quarter.
Auguston passed to Potter, who made
a lateral pass to Rentner for 25.
yards, stopping on the eight-yard
line., With a first down and goal
to go, Auguston made two and then
one as Petoskey stopped him. Re-
geczi sliced through the blockers and
nailed Rentner for a 10 yard loss.
Rentner thenpassed incomplete and
Michigan got the ball on downs.
A local theatre today will show the
news-reel pictures of the game.

STATISTICS

Mich.'
Yards gained by rukhing 91
By passing..........95
Penalties . ... ... 35
Passes attempted .......17
Incomplete ..... ... 9
Intercepted...........2
Time outs ..............5
First downs by rushing.. 1
By passing........... 3
By penalties.......... 1
Punting average ........37
Run-back of punts.....177
Fumbles........... .. 5
Fumbles recovered.......5
Fay carried ball 13 times,
yards, gained 36, average 2
Regeczi carried ball 10 times,

N. U
12
8
3
1
4
6
lost
yard
lost

J.
7
5
5
7
8
2
5
8
2
0
2
1
5
5
2
.s'
3',

T
i
i
l
3
J
)
GR
V
5
5
2
.

gained 27, average 2.4" yards. New-
man carried ball 16 times, lost 15,
gained 32, average 1 yard. Ever-
hardus carried ball 3 times, lost 0,
gained 11, average 3.66 yards. Hes-
ton carried ball 2 times, lost 0, gained
5,- average 2.5 yards.
Rentner carried the ball 22 times,
lost 34, gained 75, average 2.3 yards.
Olson carried the ball 10 times, lost
7, gained 30, average 2.5 yards. Sul-
livan carried ball 7 times, lost 0,
gained 40, average 5.7 yards.. Leeper
carried ball 2 times, lost 0, gained 6,
average 3 ards. Augustson carried
ball 4 times, lost 0, gained 7, average
1.75 yards.
Among 23 states having residents
on the 110-man Notre Dame varsity,
Indiana has the most, 20; Illinois
and New York have 12 each; Michi-
gan 10 and Ohio nine.

I

7-7, In Opener'
Fumble Gives Ohio StateI
First Scoring Chance;
Hoosiers Show Power
COLUMBUS, O., Oct. 8-The Hoo-,
siers of Indiana and the Buckeyes of I
Ohio State opened their Western
Conference football season here to-
day with a 7 to 7 tie. A crowd of
some 20,000 persons saw the game.
Ohio was the first team to score,
after beating off a strong Indiana
drive in the first quarter. The Buck-
eye touchdown came early in the
second period when Veller of Indi-
ana fumbled one of Cramer's quick
kicks on his own nine-yard line.
Ohio State recovered and scored
on three plays. Cramer and Hinch-
man carried the ball to the five-yard
line, after which the elusive Carroll
circled left end for a touchdown.
Vucinich's place kick for the extra
point was good.
Opasik, Hoosier quarterback, in-
tercepted a pass by Cramer in the
third quarter, carrying the ball 38
yards to the Ohio 19-yard line,
whence a series of plunges culmi-
nated in Veller's going over for a
touchdown. Kehich kicked the ty-
ing point.
Twice in the first half Indiana
came close to touchdowns, but the
Buckeye line held both times. Early
in the game Indiana attempted a
place-kick from the 10-yard line aft-
er failing to gain on two line plays,
but it went wild.
Again, just before the half ended,
Indiana pounded its way to a foot
from a tally, but was stopped by a
gallant Ohio State stand. In the
third quarter, after the score had
been tied, a rapid overhead attack
brought Indiana to Ohio's 19-yard
mark, but this threat, too, was
stopped.
Ohio State made only one serious
threat after its score in the second
period. This was just a few plays
before Opasik intercepted the pass
that led to the tying touchdown.
Cramer ran back the kickoff 30
yards, and a series of end runs and
slashed through the line carried the
oval to the 20-yard line, where the
Buckeyes were stopped.
Kipke, Dorais To Speak
At Banquet In Pontiac
PONTIAC, Oct. 8-Harry Kipke,
University of M i c h i g a n football
coach; Charles E. Dorais, Univer-
sity of Detroit mentor, and James H.
Crowley, Michigan State grid tutor,
are scheduled to speak at a banquet
here Tuesday night.

Ostrander Tops
Opening Cross
Country Trials'
Hoyt Pleased As Veteran
Is Timed At 12.58; Hill'
Runs In Second Place
Coach Charley Hoyt yesterday put
his Varsity candidates through their
first time trials of the year, with, as
he expressed it, very satisfactory re-
sults.
The first man to finish was Floyd
Ostrander, of last year's team, in the
time of 12.58. He was followed by
Hill, whose time was 13.14. The next
two men ran a dead heat, finishing
in 13.25. They were McManus and
McMillan.
The next five runners finished at
intervals of five or six seconds: Clark
13.31; McKensie 13.35; Milnecher
13.41; Bednick 13.45; and Simons
13.56. Gerber's time was 14.37 and
Zeigler's, 15.01.
It was an excellent day for the
trials. The course was dry and fast.
The only drawback was a stiff wind
that blew directly into the runner's
faces all the way out, although it
did help them along on the home
stretch.
The greatest disappointment of the
trials was the fact that neither of the
Howell brothers were able to run.
Captain Roger Howell has been
troubled with a blistered foot during
the last week, while his brother,
Roderic, has been sick.
"The time was as good as could
be expected for the first run," com-
mented Hoyt. The showing of Os-
trander and Hill was expected, but
the times turned in by McManus,
McMillan, Clark and McKensie were
mildly surprising to Hoyt. In speak-
ing of them he said, * "They're all
good boys. Of course, we couldn't
tell much today since these were the
first trials of the season. We'll be
able to say much more in the near
future, particularly after next Satur-
day's trials."
Donnie Bush Standing
Pat On Offer To Reds
MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 8-(iP)-Un-
less he makes a deal to manage th
Cincinnati National League club
Donnie Bush said today he would
return next year to seek anothe
American Association championship
for the Minneapolis Millers.
Bush said he was "standing pat'
on his proposition to Sidney Weil
president of the Cincinnati Reds, for
a three-year contract at $25,000 an-
nually.
Plans for Minneapolis' 1933 team
already are being made by Bush
who lost the Little World Series to
Newark of the International League

FROM THE PRESS BOX
By JOHN THOMAS

TWO IN A ROW, and for the past
two Saturdays men who were
thought to be probable All Americans
were stopped in their tracks by Mich-
igan. Yesterday the Wolverine eleven
was able to turn backmEnrest Pug'
Rentner at the crucial moments, and
last week the Maize-and-Blue war-
riors stopped Bob Monnett, State's
best bet.
WOMEN are not allowed in the
press box of the Stadium unless
they are accredited sport writers.
Yet yesterday the, tradition was
broken when a women was serving in
the newly-erected refreshment booth.
And she did not have gold teeth
either,
AN ILLUSTRIOUS visitor--Joe E.
Brown, well-known screen star
and quite a baseball player himself,
viewed the entire contest from the
Press Box. An interview with Mr.
Brown will be found elsewhere in the
paper. Personally we did not notice

a big mouth, but rather a medium
sized one.
TWO UNUSUAL injuries occurred
in the course of yesterday's con-
test. Albert Lowrey, varsity cheer
leader, suffered a dislocated knee and
was carried from the field. The sec-
ond accident came late in the game
when one of the officials suffered a
charley-horse and had to call time
out for himself. Ministrations of Ted
Petoskey and Dr. Lyman put him
back in shape.
PICTURES of the battle will be
seen throughout the country.
Over 20 cameramen were present,
some taking stills and five newsreel
companies were represented.
RENTNER is a strange name. It
has been combined with Pug to
identify an All-American. But the
strangest thing about it, so the lino-
type operators report, is that it can
be spelled backwards and it still re-
mains r-entne-r.

0
*ial rain"
To
COLUMBUS OHIO
For
MICHIGAN- OHIO FOOTBALL GAME
ll
t For The University of Michigan BAND and ROOTERS, The
Ann Arbor R. R. will operate an all-coach special train with
e dining ear, Ain Arbor to Columbus.
,r
GOING
Leave Ann Arbor............7:00 A.M. (ET) Saturday, Oct. 15th
Arrive Columbus Via N.Y.C., . .11:30 A.M. (ET) Saturday, Oct. 15th
RETURNING
Leave Columbus Via N.Y.C.. 6:00 P.M. (ET) Saturday, Oct. 15th
Arrive Ann Arbor .............10:30 P.M. (ET) Saturday, Oct. 15th
e
$5.O0 Round Trip $5.00
a
Railroad tickets on sale daily at Ann Arbor R. R. Station,
also at Michigan Union Bldg., 7:00 P. M. to 10:00 P. M. daily and
at Womens' League Thursday and Friday evenings.
r
The Ann Arbor Railroad Company
, IThe New York Central Railroad Company
0
.

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