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October 04, 1932 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-04

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THE ~MIOHIGAN- DAILY

CHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

Dr. Margaret Bell, professor of physical edgca-
tion.
We call the attention of the students to this
series because it is designed especially to assist
them with their health problems. It would be al-
most superfluous to point out again that good
physical condition is as important to success
in University work as hard stuGy.

A .

"4 S

S.;,

. -' '

mUSic

11I

By Kathleen Murphy

, mC E N iiN cm s a m Nl AH , qe a~
ublished every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
tMember of the -Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tien and the Big 'Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mal.,;$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publishers Representatives,
Inc., 40 East ThirtyFourth Street, New York City; 80
:Boylstn Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR...........FRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR......................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORS EDITOR.............. .JOHN W. THOMAS
W MEN'S EDIT OR..... ......MARGARETOH'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......ELSIE FELDMAN
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, Norman F. Kraft,
J1hn W. Pritchard, Joseph W. Renhan, C. Hart Schaaf,
Brackley Shaw, Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman.
REPORTERS: Edward Andrews, Hyman J. Aronstam, A.'
llis Ball, Charles G. Barndt, James Bauchat, Donald
R. Bird, Donald F. Blankertz,'Charles B. Brownson,
Artur W. Carstens,. Donald Elder, Robert Engel, d-
Ward A. Genz, Eric Hall, John C. Healey, Robert B.
,ewett, Alvin Schleifer, George Van Vleck, Cameron
Walker, Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W. Stoddard White,
Leonard A. Rosenberg.
Eleanor B. Blum, Miriam Carver, Louise Crandall, Carol
J. -Hannan, Frantces Manchester, Marie J. Murphy,
.Margaret C. Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Marjorie West-
ern and Harriet Speiss.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER... ............BYRON C. VEDDER
C(RRDIT MANAGER...................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvl Aronson Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke;Cr-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; .Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: Theodore Barash, Jack Bellamy, Gordon
Boylan, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Howard -Klein, Allen Knuus, George
Laurie, Charles Mercili, Russell Read, Lester Skinner,
Joseph Sudow and Robert Ward.
Betty Aigler, Edna .Canner, Genevieve Field, Ann Gall-
meyer, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Helen Grossner,
Kathryn Jackson, Dorothy Laylin, Virginia McComb,
.Caroline Mosher, Helen Olson, Helen Schume, May See-'
fried, 'Kathryn Stork.
You All Know Him;
You All HAte 1H-n. .
A LTHOUGH campus hazing activi-
ties have declined to the point of
non-existence, and pot-wearing is gasping its last,
there still exists a certain group of rah rah college
students who apparently consider.it their bounden
duty to make life miserable for others. We refer
to the Noise-Makers who attend the movies.
The Noise-Maker is a first cousin to the Hisser,
the Booer, and the Constantly Dissatisfied One.
He is a childish, impudent fool, and he glories in
it .You all know him; you all hate him.
The marquee and billing space outside a theatre
is for the express purpose of telling the pros-
pective movie-goer just what he may expect in-
side. If it is billed as a fairy-story, as was the
case in "Chandu the Magician," the student who
cannot see and assimilate a fairy-story is not
asked to 'o inside. The same is true of the love
picture, the western, the horror thriller, and the
comedy.
But the Noise-Makers connot realize this. They
go where they know they will dislike the picture.
Because then they can show to best advantage
their imitation of the train-whistle, their skill
at repartee, their ability to chime in ahead of thei
actor, and their whole gamut of strange soundsI
and cackles.
At "Chandu the Magician" (which, incidental-
ly, was liked by 90 per cent of the audience) the
Certain Few were in seventh heaven, When
Chandu gazed into the crystal, they made mys-
terious nazalized sounds; when he communicated
with another's mind they called off telephone
numbers and urged him to "hang up" and try
again; in short, they roared their disapproval of
everything supernatural, and the supernatural
was the very foundation of the picture.
Could they have forseen that they wouldn't like
it? Certainly. Did they? You know the Noise-
Maker too well!
There is no adequate punishment yet devised

for these college-students (note that we do not
use the word "University") who smack their lips
while the hero kisses the heroine. Throwing them
out of the theatre is no good; they'll be at the
next show you go to. Besides, it's impractical.
They might be shamed into silence, but it seems
doubtful. It appears that would-be funny men,
like worn-out plots, are just one more thing the
American public must bear up under. And, as
William Haines said in a late picture, "What
an awful beating the American public takes!"
So we make the plea: Won't you hare-brained
"college-boys" who can't sit through a feature
without distorting it kindly stay at home and
study? We hope so.
The Daily Will Print
Health Articles...
WITH Sunday morning's issue, The
Daily offered the first of a new
sersniof' ntiels on student health. one of which

H

What with the Cesar Franck sonata, a group of
semi-modern French songs, some Handel, and a
harp that ascended above its usual inane sweet-
nesses, Sunday's Faculty Concert, the opening one
of the series, promises an interesting year ahead,
if it was any indication of what is to come.
Even though he is extremely successful on the
concert stage, one always feels that Arthur Hack-
ett rightfully belongs in opera because of the
very pictural quality of his singing. He gave the
Handel recitative and aria a romantic interpre-
tation whose rounded sweeps of line and phrase
varied from the vigorous angularity which one
usually associates with this composer. His lovely
tone and fine dynamic shading was especially evi-
dent in the aria which is one of Handel's most
lyric moments. Unfortunately the accompani-
ment, particularly in the first, was too loud in
several spots.
This occasion marked the debut of Ruth Pfohl,
harpist, as a member of the faculty of the School
of Music, in this series. Miss Pfohl evidently re-
gards the harp as something more than "heaven-
ly," giving it a life and an interest which carries
it almost beyond the prescribed limits of this in-
astrument. The transcription of the C minor
Prelude of Chopin was the least successful of
her group-as was quite to be expected since these
can seldom realize the possibilities of the indi-
vidual medium. Salzedo's Mirage, better suited
to the instrument, showed a much wider variety,
with its interesting percussive effects and chang-
ings of color by other. than just dynamic means.
Among the more than fifty pieces for this instru-
ment by Hassemans, professor of harp at the
Paris Conservatoire and a widely popular virtuoso
at the end of the last century, is the Lamento
which was done with evident dramatic feeling and
vigor of interpretation. The neutral colorings
of the more modern schools are well suited to the
harp, which, while certainly one of the most
"beautiful" of all the instruments in appearance,
and some might concede, in sound, is neverthe-
less greatly limited as a medium of expression.
Mr. Hackett's French group could well be taken
in twos and twos, with the Franck La Procession
in the middle. The Letorey had a monotonous
charm, which, although it reached interesting cli-
maxes (that probably were due more to the singer
than the song) was spoiled by the sentimental
sweeps of melody which turned it into the con-
ventional popular ballad. Hahn's Trois Jours de
Vendage was of .the same type with the addition
of a semi-religious trend which is probably a trace
of the sensitivity of Massanet, whose pupil he
was, The Franek song was very well suited to the
dramatic qualities of Mr. Hackett's voice, the
recitative like melodic line and the rich orchestral
.accompaniment with its characteristic chromatic
resolutions, reaching heighths of intensity which
made this the outstanding number of the group.
The twohGaubert songs were typical of the French
neo classics, tinged with modernism; both the
atmospheric Sur La Mer and Le Ciel showing a
freedom of thematic structure from the increased
importance of the accompaniment, with a cor-
responding widening of expression. Mr. Hack-
ett's nice feeling for the whole conception as a
unity rather than a group of phrases gave these
songs a clarity which they mpight otherwise have
lacked.
The floating sweetness of Mr. Besekirsky's tone
was a lovely medium for the more lyrical mo-
ments of the beautiful Franck sonata, especially
in the calm and happy Allegretto, whose reach-
ing and descending theme is so reminiscent in
spirit of the third, movement of the D minor
symphony. The very difficult piano part was mas-
terly handled by Joseph Brinkman with a breath
taking facility. In some places, however, the
piano became so much the soloist that it was
difficult to tell whether the violin was playing
except by looking, for it was covered completely,
especially in the low passages on the G string.
This sonata, which was inspired by the com-
poser's admiration of the great Ysaye, is "one of
the first and most striking examples of the adop-
tion of the developmental variations to traditional
forms." Here the cyclic type of constructions
finds a new and remarkable application. There
are only three themes, which, by extensionand
compression, form the whole internal structure of
the work and all of them are derived from the
main subject which, in turn, is based upon a
tiny motive of three notes.. The first movement
consists chiefly of- the statement and repetition
of this theme in various modulations, but by the
alternation of the instruments and rythmic
changes, it achieves variety, although the only
definite cadence comes with the last note of the
movement. The third-a recitative fantasia-
serves as a transition from the Allegro to the last
movement. Franck's scrupulous respect for form
undoubtedly forbid him to apply a classical title
to this movement which begins in D and ends in
F sharp minor. Here the running clarity of the

chief theme is in direct contrast to the lovely and
mournful recitative, which has dramatic moments
of great beauty. A fine sensitivity to the feel-
ings of the movement was shown by both of the
players. The last movement, a type of rondo,
carries on the climatic evolution of the whole
sonata, by four expositions of the refrain in
canon, the first three leading by a development
in which all the principal motifs appear, to the
fourth, which sweeps, by means of a greatly ex-
tended crescendo, to the splendidly brilliant con-
clusion, giving it an impression of oneness that
makes it not a work in four movements for two
instruments, but the clear exposition of one idea
-coherently developed and expressed through a
single concerted medium.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of communicants will, how-
ever, be regardedsas confidential upon requttest,
Contributors are asked to be brief, confining them-
selves to less than 300 words if possible.

the part of a teacher. In connection .with this
subject, Miss Co-Ed gives a highly diverting touch
,to the picture. She writes: "Others (i.e. pro-
fessors) again, feel perfectly at home in the midst
of their pupils (?) and say exactly the same
things to them as to their wives and children
during a family scrap." Dear reader, imagine a
nice little scrap in ,a class of philosophy or Greek
literature It is to be hoped that Miss Co-Ed
will continue to bring out some more such comic
traits of educational practice. Referring to a cer-
tain instructor, the lady Co-Ed writes of him that
he "just didn't have the tact (she! means art or
ability) to put (his knowledge) across." Of course
she is right in demanding that a teacher should
possess the ability to community his knowledge'
to others.
Working for a Ph.D. while teaching works con-
siderable harm in many cases to the student body.
As far as I know, no such practice exists in Eur-
ope-i.e. teaching and working for a high degree.
Should such a practice exist here?
Coming now to what the lady considers of
prime importance, viz. the necessity of more fre-
quent bluebooks, I take the liberty of funda-
mentally disagreeing with her. Marks, grades,
and degrees may indicate nothing more than pure
memory work. They may, of course, also rep-
resent the art of thinking, and hence, education.
However, in themselves they prove nothing. They
are artificial and desired chiefly by those who
are constantly looking for some outside reward-
as if getting an education was not a sufficient
reward in itself ! The whole argument may be
summed up by asking oneself whether one is
getting an education for marks-or for life. In
general, what counts is not what one remembers
(at an examination) but how one's character has
been affected and how one's thinking powers have
been developed pr improved. What the Univer-
sity did for me was to help me to help myself.
That is, it put me in the way of helping myself.
Of what I actually learned, I remembered very
little-possibly 10 per cent.
More bluebooks? No. I suggest fewer blue-
books, hence fewer examinations. It is to be
hoped that the practice of holding only one exam-
ination at the end of each semester will continue.
Still better would be a comprehensive examina-
tion at the end of the four years. (I have in mind
the literary department.) Such examinations
would show whether the student has profited tby
the higher education. For further enlightenment
on the subject of "marks, credits, and degrees,"
I refer the lady to a book by George S. Counts:
"The American Road to Culture," more especially
page 7, et seq.
M. Levi,
Professor Emeritus

Davis & (Ohlinger
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11

11

EN AVANT
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An

Burr, Patterson & Auld Co.
MeO'v~tctIn~j Fr41tngIY Jew0tr,
Detroit, Michigan & Walkerville, Ontario
A A A
For your conyenience

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Ann A6rbor
603 Church
ANK OAKES

Store
Sc.

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. M

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard St.
Today 11:30 to 1:30
Spaghetti and Meat Balls
Spanish Pork Chops
Hot Beef and Pork Sandwiches
Mashed otatoes - Vegetable Salad
Banana-Nut Salad - P'nut Sandwich
Coffee whip, Cake, Ice cream
Fruit desert
Coffee -Milk
30c
5:30 to 7:30
Soup
Individual Chicken Pies
vegetable Plate with Roast Beef
Roast Pork - Apple Sauce
Breaded Veal. Cutlets
Roast Leg of.Lamb
Sausage and Eggs
Mashed or auGratin Potatoes
Peas and Carrots - Beats
Vegetable Salad
Pie, Cake, Ice cream, Baked Apples -
Coffee - Tea - Milk
40c

CON C ERTS~
CHORAL UNION SERIES
Oct. 25, BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor. Only Mich-
igan concert of America's premier orchestra
Nov. 2, LAWRENCE TIBBETT
PRINCE OF BARITONES.
Nov. 30, DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor. Only Ann
Arbor appearance this season
Dec. 12, EFREM ZIMBALIST
DISTINGUISHED RUSSIAN VIOLIN IST.
Jan. 16, NATHAN MIILSTE I N
SPECTACULAR RUSSIAN-SOVIET VIOLINIST.
In Ann Arbor debut.
Jan. 7, MYRA HESS
Acclaimed "World's foremost woman pianist."
Feb. 8, BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
Jose Roisman, first violin; Alexander Schneider,
second violin; Stephan lpolyi, viola; Mischa
Schneider, 'cello. Ann Arbor debut of "Europe's
finest quartet."
Feb. 15, SEGRID ONEGI N
Ann Arbor debut of outstanding contralto, both
in opera and concert.
Mar.6, VLADIMI R HOROWITZ
Eminent Russian pianist in third Ann Arbor
appearance.
Mar. 15, PADEREWSKI
"King of Pianists" in eighth Ann Arbor concert
during a period of 41 years, beginning Feb. 15,
1893.
Season tickets may be ordered by mail, or' orders may be
left at the School of Music, Maynard street (10 concerts)
$6.00 - $8.00 - $10.00 - $12.00. Please make checks
payable to "University Musical Society" and mail to
Charles A. Sink, President.

r1 1-

DIAGONAL
By arton Kane
Watermelon Philanthropist
D sapproving Uncle Bob
Red-Head

Louis-LOU'S-Deising
-FOUNTAIM
LUNCHEONETTE
800 S. State at Hill
SPECIAL NOON-DAY
LUNCHES 30c
SPECIAL
PLATE DINNERS 40c
Including Dessert
Call - We Deliver - 9122

SEVERAL large watermelons distributed about
his person, a freshman of obviously farm line-
age was observed in the Union taproom yesterday.
Freshman was eating watermelons with evident
enjoyment. Asked what he was doing, he replied
that he was "giving watermelon away to anyone
who wanted it."
R. GARLICK, class of '36, rang the bell of a
prominent fraternity .a couple of nights ago,
announced himself. Said the active on door
duty, "Glad to know you, Garlick. We ought to
get together-my name's Hamburg." It was.
* * *'
"UNCLE BOB" CAMPBELL, genial onetime
treasurer of the University, mayor, city
solon, and general factotum, who is perhaps
known to most people as the godfather of the
Varsity Band, was displeased with "his boys" yes-
terday on their march from Morris Hall to the
Stadium. Ahead of the band, on his motorcycle,
in full military uniform, brindle breeches, boots,
rode Rex L. Allbright, last year's manager of the
Fighting Band. Onetime Manager Allbright,
motorcycle fan who has twice ridden to the West
Coast, was on traffic duty ahead of the band, as-
sisting his fraternity brethren Manager A. Stan-
ley McGaughan and Assistant Manager Kenneth
Campbell in getting cars out of the way for the
band. Observed Uncle Bob, "I don't like that.
Ann Arbor has a police force. Why don't the boys
use it?"
SWIMMING Coach Matt Mann thinks that Diver
Diver Degener is working too hard; has ad-
vised some other sport. Degener has taken up
horseshoes.
T HE house with the white pillars, north of the
campus, held its tea on Sunday. Lots and
lots of the boys were there. The boys' parents
were also there, too. The refreshments were fur-'
nished by Mrs. Philip E. Bursley and Mrs. Wilfred
B. Shaw. The boys and parents had great fun;
drank tea.
I VAN WILLIAMSON, The Terror, is again in the
limelight. Over the Coca Cola sign at With-
air's Drug store is a football scene. Poison Ivy
is the gentleman in the foreground.
LAST year, Bill Elliot, Sigma Phi, was appointed
business manager of Gargoyle; gave the assis-
tantship to a fraternity brother. This year, there
was a vacancy on the junior staff of Gargoyle
business. Elliot appointed a man to fill the posi-
tion who had never been out for the publication;
is giving him a salary. The man is a Sigma Chi.
* * *
FRATERNITY men having trouble with rushing
should read this story and be cheered. At
the University of North Carolina the following
happened: a confident young frosh entered a fra-
ternity house; told the brothers that "he had
come to stay;" was informed that he first must
have a bid; stated, "O. K., I can bid as high
as the next man."
* * *
TITIAN=HAIRED daughter of a literary college
professor wears a small brown hat with a nice
little bow in the back. She also keeps company
with a very small immaculate gentleman.. Re-
cently, the young lady went into Slater's accom-
panied by her beau; a clerk looked at the bow
of her hat; said, "My what a cute little bow."
The young man with her blushed; turned away.
Z.. 1C +V ixyi-A T trnynm* *lriv *1ia r

1

DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

- . :
--- - -

Good

Clotl als

Need
JUST as you spend a lot of time and
money in the proper upkeep of your health
or all expensive car, so it is im.portant that
you give your expensive clothes the besst pos-
sible treatinenit. Such a laundering process
as is lit'use the Thre Varsity is dlesigned~ to
ninimnize wear on your gartments and to give
thei the best possie apearanee. That is
whry we use IVORY SOAP exclusively.
M 7*
/T( <E
Ii

I

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