100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TrHE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

K

11

took the freshmen in last fall with the under-
standing that they would stay with them for the
entire first year.
This is undoubtedly true but it would be folly
for the landladies to argue that they would not
have taken the first year men in if they had
known that they would stay for only one se-
mester.
With the total enrollment of students, particu-
larly the freshman and sophomore classes, down
far below that of previous years, there was a
large over-supply of rooms this fall. Many room-
ing houses were not filled. Landladies welcomed
the opportunity to take any students they could
get, on almost any conditions that the student
wished tq make.
The average student does not feel that he owes
anything to the Ann Arbor landlady. He feels
that he has paid for any service that he has
received from her. He feels that, on certain
occasions, he has paid for more than he has re-
ceived from her.
He admits that if the ruling prohibiting first
gear men from living in fraternities was lifted,
it would cause serious economic trouble to land-
ladies.

-r . -ne
M~fRTf WARD N(Q7HT hp sor V d.4 - V.. ;Jh T ane '110 ~ ..etl.uo. , M,,,
Published every morning except Monday during the
iversity year and Summer Session by the Board in
mtrol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
in and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
t otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
iblished herein. All rights of republication of special
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
cond class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Bird Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
il, $4.50.
Ofices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
in Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
c., 40 East Thirty Fourth2 Street, New York City; 80
ylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,

crystallized movement for Philippine indepen-
dence, America can genuinely point with pride
to this rare phenomenon of a voluntary with-
drawal from imperial power. No matter what the
motives of our furling of the flag, (and certainly
our flight from the far Pacific will not be purely
a matter of principle) no other nation can boast
as signal an evidence of sincere intent to avoid
the evils of imuerialism.
In the past, American rule abroad has proved
a patchwork of good and evil, dependent for its
results largely upon the abilities and intentions of
the individual administrators and governors, who
have in many cases been chosen blindly, or for
political purposes. It has been subject, therefore,
both to the benefits and the dangers of semi-
despotic control.
Time alone will tell just how successful and
how beneficial the various ventures of this coun-
try have been. The judgment of history on Nica-
ragua, however, can almost be made now. We
wvent in for the protection of our importing busi-
ness; we were not entirely moderate in' the uses
of our power therein; we stayed much longer than
real altruistic policy would dictate, but, we left,
lock, stock and barrel, with a stable government
in power and peace in the land. What more can
be said!
--Cornell Daily Sun

If you write, we' ake fIt.
Corrspondenice ate tioziezy,
7oditein Pe, !zkg etc.
! pawiters all1owe.
Greeting Cards for
0. D.MO RRI

i.#

3s i. . , AmAbor.

s r

EDITORIAL STAFF
F . Telephn925
MANAGING EDITOR.............FRANK B. GIBRETHj
CITY. EDITOR.............. ... KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR................JOHN W. THOMAS1
*OEN'S EDITOR..........MARGARET O'BRIEN
,ASSITANT WOMEN'S EDITOR ...... MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan,.Norman F. Kraft,
John W. Pritchard, Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf,
Brackley Shaw, Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harold Wolfe.
RPWORTERS: Hyman J. Aronstam, Charles Baird, A.
Elis Ball, Charles G. Barndt, James L. Bauchat, Donald1
F. Blakertz, CharlesB. Brownson, Arthur W. Carstens,
talph G. Coulter, William G. erris, Sidney Frankel,
Ere Hall, John C. Healey, Robert B. Hewett, George M.
Holmes, Walter E. Morrison, Edwin W. Richardson,
John Simpson, George Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.,
W. Stoddard White.
Katherine Anning, Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck,
.Eleanor B. Blum, Maurine Burnside, Ellen Jane Cooley,
Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman, Anne Dunbar,
Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
Frances'J. Manchester. Marie J Murphy, Eleanor
Peterson, Margaret D. Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Harriet
Spess, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER. . .. BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT dMANAGER...................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
lFinn-
ASSICTANTS: Jack Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
lan, Charls Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
JOseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
' Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
'Gimnmy, Billy Grifliths, Virginia Hartz Catherine Mc-
. Henry, Helen Olson, Helen Schmude, May Seefried,
thryn Stork.
SUNDAY, JAN. 8, 1933
Help The Needy?
PIm One Of Them.
YOU CAN SOMETIMES evade an
argument by moving over to the
;other side. And you can evade the Good Will
Fund by saying, "Help the needy? Why should I?
I'm one of them."
It's a good gag, but it's rather trite and doesn't
excuse anything.
What would you think if your father tried it on
you at the beginning of the month? Or if your
employer asked "Why should I pay you to do work
that I can handle, when I need the money my-
self?"
Many students will contend that it is not their
concern if four or five hundred students are try-
ing to get through the Universi~ty without enough
money to maintain health and mental security
They Will declare facetiously that those who
want an education badly enough to suffer for it
are getting what's coming to them.
Ostensibly, it's a strong argument. But put
yourself in the position of the student who need
food and clothing; perhaps your views will
change. Unfortunately, incomes are made and
broken with considerable ease under the present
system, you know.
Perhaps you really believe that you cannot af
ford.to contribute, even if-the fund is worthy. Al
right, ask yourself a few questions:
Do you go to the cinema often?
Do you go to dances often?
Do you spend money for soft drinks, confec-
tions and other non-essentials?
Do you have several extra suits or dresses?
Do you buy many accessories in dress that
serve only as compliments to your vanity?
Now let us ask a auestion: Would it detract
very much from your happiness to give up one or
two movies, or a dance, or a couple of neckties;
'to omit the daily coca-cola for a week or two?
Assuming that you are one of the minority, would
it rob you of your popularity, or hurt your posi-
tion, to give up one of those extra dresses or suits
to someone who has a real need for it?
There are nearly eight thousand students on
campus who have enough money for all neces-
' sities and some luxuries. There are probably be-
tween three hundred and five hundred who
- haven't enough even: for necessities. The Good
Will Fund committee believes that $10,000 will
fill the gap. An average gift of a little more than
a dollar from the eight thousand who can afford
it will fill the quota.
There is no question of the ability of the Mich-

igan student body to solve its own problem of
want. The question is whether we are too self-
centered and careless of the needs of our fellows
to solve it. Before the campus di'ive starts this
week, think it over,

But he sees that if it is not lifted, it will cause
serious economic trouble to his fraternity,.which
has been faced with this difficulty for the past
two years.
He feels that his fraternity should be allowed
to compete an an even basis with the rooming
house, without artificial protection to the latter
by a University ruling.
He feels that, if his fraternity house is a more
desirable place to live than the rooming house,
from the point of view of the undergraduate, the
undergraduate ought to be allowed to live there.
As for the future of the Ann Arbor landlady,
he is not concerned, as he realizes that freshman
dormitories, which seem inevitable, will mean
that a great many of them will be forced to
go - out of business.
Until the dormitories are built, he believes that
landladies, by improving the atmosphere and liv-
ing conditions of their houses, can compete on
even grounds with fraternities.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The namies of. communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
ARGUMENTS AGAINST WAR
To The Editor:
1. If I were to kill one person some of these
days, my reward (?) would probably be 25 years
in prison or death by hanging or in the electric
chair.
2. If an army sets forth with the purpose of
killing thousands, nay millions, of young men-
the enemy-then upon the conquerors bonuses,
pensions, laurels, etc., are lavished, and they are
. . .heroes! Dear reader, weigh and consider!
3. When soldiers set forth to engage in war, that
is, in killing their brothers, the holy churches'
bless the flags and pray to the Lord for victory.
But victory is impossible without the killing or
mutilating of the soldiers' brothers, nor without
devastation, destruction, and general. misery
among the civilian population--one naturally
asks just what the mission of the church is.
-M. Levi.
Professor Emeritus

Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"IF I HAD A MILLION"
* * * MILLIONAIRE GIVES $1,000,000
TO PEOPLE AT RANDOM
John Glidden .......... Richard Bennett
John Walker ...........Gene Raymond
Phineas Lambert .... Charles Laughton
Steven Gallagher .......... Gary Cooper
3rd Marine ..............Roscoe Karns
Mulligan................Jack Oakie
Mrs. Peabody ............. Mary Boland
Henry Peabody ........ Charles Ruggles
Violet Smith.........Wynne Gibson
Edward Jackson .:........George Raft
Emily La Rue ........ Alison Skipworth
Rollo.................W. C. Fields
Hot-Dog Proprietor . .Lucien Littlefield
"If I Had A Million" is an enthralling align-
ment of Eeven episodes telling what happened to
characters chosen at random from a city tele-
phone directory, when they were handed $1,000,-
000 each out of a blue sky by multi-millionaire
John Glidden.
Written by 16 of the best authors Hollywood
has to offer, "If I had a Million" will make you
groan, laugh, yell with delight and gasp with
surprise in successive moments. One recipient of
the unbelievable prize rapidly follows-on the other,
and each episode, you are forced to admit, is
better than the other.
George Raft, as Edward Jackson, forger, thief,
and scoundrel, gained tremendous appreciation
for his role. When given his certified check, Raft
goes from bank to bank in a futile attempt to
cash it. Newsboys are already hawking extras
telling of his latest forgery. With the '1,000,000
still burning his pocket, Raft goes without food
from day to day, and is even turned out of a
flop-house because hehasn't a dime!
Charles Laughton took the biggest single laugh.
To tell the circumstances would be to spoil the
scene.
Others who are given $1,00,000 apiece are an
inhabitant of an old ladies' home, a Marine, a
shady lady, a china clerk (Charles Ruggles-ex-
cellent), an ex-vaudeville trouper, and a convicted
murderer.
Wonderful material to work with, certainly, and
it is amazingly well done. The Majestic played
last night to a capacity house, for "If I Ifad
a Million" isn't a show you'll keep under your
hat long. -G. M. W. Jr.
STARSt_4

t
...
'+.:
"' :.:
_..;.._
M

SUDDEN
SERVICE
PHOTOGRAPHS DO LIVE
and keep alive a lot of important mem-
ories. . . you'll especially value those
pictures you take now ... and, natural-
ly, you want them to be the type of
photos that will stand the test of time
. . . the best way of assuring yourself
of good work in photo finishing is to
bring them here, where fine work is the
tradition.
FRANCISCO BOYCE PHOTO COMPANY
719 North University

1

... Let the Daily Classi-
fieds find your room for
next semester...
CALLAL
TheAdoTaker
2-1214-

MILSTEI

Nathan the Wise"
RUSSIAN
VIOLINIST
*Choral Union Series
Monday, Jai:..l16
8:15
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets $1.00-$1.50-$2.00-$2.50
Season Tickets
$6.00-$8.00-$10.00-$12.00
on sale at
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
A Maynard Street

..

LANDLADIES VS. THE UNIVERSITY
To The Editor:
Reading your editorial in today's paper, I won-
Ier if the University realizes its indebtedness to
ts students. The fraternities running in Ann Ar-
>or help the working students in several ways, by
riving them a standard of food suitable for their
velfare. Granted, they work for it -but if that
vere taken off them how many would have to
ive under a very poor system of food and would
3e undernourished?
You cannot expect a man to do an efficient
amount of work- if his body does not receive the
ood Nature meant for him. Taking 48 fra-
ernitie, on this campus there are about 300 to
X00 students employed. How many are employed
y the landladies? They give them a bed for
.oking after the furnaces and stop at that. I
hope the University will see the need of helping
he fraternities to keep up their standards of liv-
ng and helping the students that are working for
heir board. If the first-year men were allowed to
loin their fraternities in the second semester it
vould probably employ a few more students that
need work. -Mrs. Harry M. Bailey
(Employed at a Michigan Fraternity)
Editoial Cormment

....

&

STRIPES

- -By Karl Seiffert
The stock market, says a dispatch, is still im-
proving. Financial experts admit there's nothing
that can be done about it.
Walter Lippmann, political commentator, says
France has a just grievance on the war debt sit-
uation. And we, it seems, have just the debt. The
thing doesn't seem to be quite on the Laval.
COCA-COLA PIN TEAM
OPPOSES LIME COLAS
Headln
Just a, couple of set-ups.
A couple of would-be robbers walked into a
bank the other day and found state examiners
at work on the defunct institution's books. The
bandits fled, apparently getting away-bfore any=
body had a chance to sell them any bank stock.
* * *

Bothered-By
You really can't blame them for wanting to read
your Daily ... It's the best means of keeping up
with the times .. Associated Press News, Sports-
News, Social News. . . in fact, everything that
the campus cares about ... but you'll save yourself
some trouble and the borrower some money by
showing thi this ... The Daily is now..
75
DELIVERED FOR THE REST
OF THE YEAR

A FORWARD STEP TO THE REAR
New Year's Day in Nicaragua saw the last sol-
dier leave the country after an occupation that
had extended over more than six years. This ac-
tion, almost unprecedented in world history,
shows that there has been more than mere talk
behind the avowedly altruistic tendencies of the
imperialistic regime in this country. Perhaps we
have here the most striking evidence of all that
in this country the powers that control our poli-
cies have been sincere in their protestations of
benevolence.
For long years the United States has been ridi-
culed for its seemingly endless and unjustifiable
occupation of the little Central American nation.
Our interventions in the imperialistic affairs of!
other countries have been branded as two-faced,

Word comes from European breweries1
operations are "progressing favorably." In
days they'll be able to bottle it.
* * *~
RIVER FAVORED
BY CASWELL TO
SOLVE PROBLEM

that
two

i q - q

-Headline
No, no, donit do that! Hang on awhile.
Things are bound to pick up.
* * *

III

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan