100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

fi

ICHIGAN DAILY

I

-°*^'V w

the market, and that limit is rapidly being
reached.
It thus becames apparent that the doctrine of
- Technocracy, (a brand new thing in its present
phase, although the rudiments of it became appa-
rent as early as 1920) is directly contradictory to
one of the fundamental laws of modern eco-
nomics. Economics says that technological un-
employment cannot be permanent over a long
period of time, because such a condition would
be contrary to a proven law. Technocracy shouts
that technological unemployment is permanent,
that it is on the increase, that it is a menace
to society. There hangs the balance of judgment.

Ir '
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Pubiatons.
Me mber of the Western Conference Editorial Assoca-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
' The Associated PressIs exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
Plat otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Specal rate of postage granted by
'laird Assistant Postmaster~enerl.
Subscription during smter by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
An cs..Student Publicatios Building, Maynard Street.
Ann .Arbr, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,.
xc.,.40 East ThirtyFourth Street, New Yfork City; 80
Boyston Street, Boston;t612 North Michigan Avenue,
Ohiago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR . FRANK B. GIBRETH
CIT EDITO~R...............KARL SIFF'RT
ORTS EDITOR... . .. JOH.HW. THOMA
W SOEN'EDITOR.........MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASISTAt WOMENS EDITORE.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, Norman F. Kraft,
John W. Pritchard, Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Shaaf,
Brackley Shaw, Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Voss Bain, Fred A. Hliber
lbrt Newan, arold Wolfe.
5 I
R ®ORT?" S:yman J. Aronstam, Charles Baid, A.1
lis Bal, Charles G Barndt, James L. Bauchat, onald
F. Bla ertz, Charles B. Brownon, Arhlr W. Carstens
ralph a. Coute, William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel,
Erie Hal, Jhn Q. Healey, Roiert B. Hewett, Gleorge M.
Ho es, Walter X. Morrison, Edwin W. Richardson,
JohnSimrpsn,George Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr,
W = todd rd White.
Katherine Anning, Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck,
Eleanor 3. Blum, Maurine Burnside, Ellen Jane Cooley,
reinetteDnuffDCarol J. Hanan Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Frances J. Manchester, Marie J. Murphy. EleanorJ
Ptrson, Margaret D. Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Harriet
Siess, Marore Western.
BUSINESS STAFFj
Telephone 9-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.... .BYRON C. VEDDER1
CREDIT MANAGER--..................HARRY BEGLEY
WvQMEN S'BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BECER,
DEPARTMENT MANAGES: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;I
Adverising Contracts, Orvil Aronso; Advertising Ser-
ic e, ,Noel Truer; Acon ts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
cllaton, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ArISTANTS Jack Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Alen Clee-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroyason, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lcester Skinner, _Joseph ,Sudow, Robert Ward. I
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
rlinm, Billy Griffiths, Virginia Hartz CatherineM
Henry, Hieen Olson, Helen Schmude, May S5eefried,
Kathryn Stork.
FRIDAY, JAN. 6,1933
Technocracy Versus
Say's Economic Law...
T HERE are numerous angles and
almost unlimited ramifications to
the whole question of Technocracy, as advanced
by a group of faculty men, headed by a more or
less ambiguous figure by the name of Howard
Scott, at Columbia University.
Essentially, here is the argument:
(1) Technological unemployment (that caused
by constantly increasing efficiency in industrialJ
machinery), is on the increase, and will continue
permanently to increase.
(2) Therefore, it is necessary to have a definite
readjustment of industrial conditions in order
to absorb this continued unemployment.3
(3) A possible solution is (and here the Tech-.
nocrats are so vague as to be practically shrouded
in mist) a society in which there will be much
shorter working hours . . . say 12 1-2 hours a
week for each man . . fin which there will be
governmental control of industry . . . in which
an energy dollar will replace the present metal
dollar . . . in short, a workman's paradise.
The arguments of the Technocrats are suffi-
ciently dynamic to make them convincing .
to those persons who do not spend much time
thinking about it, And to the thinking class
the arguments are puzzling. They -are logical, and:
as far as anyone can see, they are unselfish. As
Senator Couzens recently put it, it is impossible
to find any selfish interest manifested among the
Technocrats..
But many economists to a great extent tend to
frown upon Technocracy. For one thing, they
point out., the idea of permanent technological
unemployment is directly contrary to Say's Law,
which stipulates that, in the long run, supply and
demand will satisfadtorily balance themselves,
and production will be stabilized.
Fortune, in the issue of December, 1932, pre-

sents the argument of Prof. Paul H. Douglas,
who in substance refutes permanent technological
unemployment by an exposition of Say's Law.
Fortune says, "It was Professor Douglas' belief
that although new mechanical devices did unar-
guably have the effect of displacing wage earners
and of displacing them in large numbers, never-
theless new mechanical devices did not and
could not cause permanent unemployment be-
cause the effect of the installation of such devices
is to cut down labor costs (which, beginning with
the processing of raw materials, are about three-
fourths of the cost of production) and thus pro-
duce a cheaper product; that the effect of the
production of a cheaper product is to cause either
an increase in production if the demand is elastic
or a saving to the purchaser if the demand is
inelastic; that in the former case few if any work-
ers need be displaced, while in the latter case
the savings of the purchasers will either be spent
on luxuries and the like or be saved and invested
as capital; and that in either event new jobs
will be created to take up the men displaced in
the original industry."

viiI - - .
Screen Reflections
four' stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"CENTRAL PARK"
**HECTIC 24 HOURS
IN NEW YORK
Dot ................... .Joan Blondell
Rick .....................W allace Ford
Charlie ....................Guy Kibbee
Nick .................. ...,Harold Huber
Eby....,........Henry B. Walthall
The Michigan's current presentation, "Central
Park," is a 24-hour cameo showing the excitement
and breath-taking action attendant upon a comp-=
licated robbery, kidnaping, lion escape, and hunt,
for a lunatic who gives carnations to the "cats"
after feeding an aged trainer to one of the beasts.
Needless to say, such adjectives as helter-skel-
ter and harum-scarum can be applied to this tale.
But if you can successfully submerge yourself in
the excitement which is undeniably there, "Cen-
tral Park," is, in the language of those it portrays,
a whipper.
There are several he-man episodes. Wallace
Ford and the heavies who kidnap him are above
the average in their ear-biting, stamping and
knockout blows on the button.
The plot is questionable-the cast beyond re-
proach. Guy Kibbee as -the cop on the Central
Park beat has a sympathetic part; Joan Blon-
dell is typically cast; Harold Huber has been
playing heavy roles for years; and Henry B. Wal-
thall does well as the lion fodder.
The lion-escape scenes have been sucked dry
in Our Gang comedies and didn't please yester-
day's audience.
Added attractions: Gertrude Messinger and
Monty Collins in a slapstick comedy, "Hollywood
Run-Around"; "The Nicklette," old-time thrillers
which are not as good as usual; "Hey, Hey, West-
erner," an operetta in color-unbelievable; Para-
mount News
-G. M. W. Jr...
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words If possible.
FAIRNESS TO PHILIPPINES
ro the Editor:
When the United States Congress passed the
Hawes-Cutting bill, Uncle Sam played the role of
a poor Santa Claus to his 13 million Filipino
nephews and nieces. The bill restricts Philippine
free trade to the United States to a ruinous extent
but the same bill does not restrict American free
trade to the Philippines during the transition
period. It also limits the number of Filipinos en-
tering the United, States while Congress still
insists in keeping the country for some years.
Justice and fair play demand that the Filipinos
also be given the right to do the same thing with,
reference to the United States.
With -reference- to the free trade question, Con-
gress should have borne in mind that the present
trade relation between the two countries were
forced on the Filipinos in 1909 in spite of the
vigorous opposition of the Philippine assembly.
The worst part of the bill is the right given to
the United States allowing her to retain her naval
bases even after the establishment of a second
Philippine republic. Independent Philippines with
the American war-dogs and their big guns in
Manila Bay will be a "big joke" and a triumph
of Will Rogers.
What the Filipinos ask is neither free trade
nor free immigration but a complete absolute
independence and liberty at any cost.
S. I. Cabanatan, Grad.

itself the apron string; it has strangled the stu-
dent voice. I refrain from mentioning three oi
four names, for some of the administration have
played their role reluctantly. Every student leader
of the various co-operative and book store proj-
ects knows that it is a case of subtle economic
determinism.
But again let's not give up the fight. Here i
a story of the students and faculty of the Na-
tional University of Mexico. They carried on thi;
same fight till 1929 when they emerged as the
National Autonomous University of Mexico, sup-
ported by the national government and rulec
entirely by the students and faculty! This il
true, believe it or not. A year ago the govern-
ment exiled three student leaders to a Pacific
island as citizens, but dared not say a word tc
them as students. A Swiss professor was also
deported; the students put up such a protest
that the government by radio directed his ship
to put him off at Cuba and to send him back
to his classes. Has not Michigan as good a tra-
dition in democracy as Mexico?
Proportional representation can free America
from the political machine. It puts principles be-
fore machines, and personalities before non-
entities. Quite possibly it is the first step towarc
a real political and industrial democracy. Violent
revolution is the alternative. It is for the student:
to experiment. and lead the way.
Charles A. Orr., Grad.
(Dear Ed., You may set this one up in front;
too, if you think it worth it.)

.Musical Events
-',

MILSTEIN, DISTINGUISIIED VIOLINIST
Nathan Milstein, the distinguished Russian
violinist who will play on the Choral Union series
Jan. 11, has been the recipient of flattering en-
coniums from distinguished music critics through-
out America. Patterson Greene in the Los An-
geles Examiner, said, "A musical whirlwind. He
eclipses all violinists save a very few and he i
surpassed by none." Carl Bronson, critic of the
Los Angeles Herald, wrote "Milstein is a new
dimension of violin virtuosity. He does nothing
particularly new but put soul into his bow arm.
Feeling is the new dimension of this youthful
master, this newly arrived genius from Russia."
Olin Downes of the New York Times, said, "A
remarkably talented youth, with a very full and
beautiful tone and a technique which is sure
and brilliant," while W. J. Henderson in the New
York Sun, said, "A pliant and free bow arm, a
keen sense of rhythm, a nice appreciation of the
contour of a phrase, temperament, and a style
ranging from suavity to a bold and confident
bravura." in the San Francisco Chronicle, Alex-
ander Friend, wrote, "An important violinist. A
virtuoso of extraordinary finesse. His tone is
beautifully pure, of a personal expressiveness and
soaring with youthful ardor," while Redfern
Mason of the San Francisco Examiner, said, "An
extraordinary talent for the fiddle. He has some-
thing that practice can never attain. Something
is there to that bolshevik courage which dares to
tell God he does not exist and mocks at the ten
commandments of Wall Street." In the Phila-
delphia Public Ledger, Samuel Laciar, wrote,
"The violinist triumphed. He has amazing tech-
nique and seems to have no weak points." In the
St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Harry R. Burke, said,
"He was a genuine sensation," while Harvey Gaul,
of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, wrote, "A miracle.
Remember the name, Milstein! Next year you'll
be trying to get in."

...
e
e
1
,
1
0
e
s
e

IF

s
r
i

2-1214
22-1214
2-1214

2=1214
2-1214
2-1214

THIS
LITTLE
NUMBER
24--
WILL
BECAUSE
MICHIGAN
DAI LY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE
INEXPENSIVE
BUT
GET
RESU LTS
CALLAL
The Ad.-Taker
at
2-1214

2-12 14
2-12 14
2-12 14

f

A',

FRIENDS AND PATRONS
While owning and managing the Lincoln Cafe at State and
Packard Streets, I was favored with your patronage for which I
am extremely grateful. Having recently disposed of my interests
there, I am now located at The Keystone Restaurant (formerly
The Lincoln at 233 South State Street) at the head of Liberty Street
and would be very much pleased to have you favor me with a call.
Its has always been my aim and practice to give the best quality of
food and service for a reasonable price and I shall endeavor to do
the same at the new place. The place has been entirely remodeled
and redecorated.
I will be open from 6 a, m. to 1 a. m. daily with special after-
theatre service.
Again thanking you for past favors and soliciting a continuance
of them and wishing you a Happy and Prosperous New Year,
Yours very truly,
FRANK MANIKAS.
Pecial Luncheonm ..30c & 40c
Club Dinner .. . ....4 & 50c
MEAL TICKETS, $6.00 for $5.00

.. SALE
*9
Black or Brown Pumps or Oxfords with
Dainty Trims in Values Up to $6.00
EARLE BOOT SHOP
123 East Liberty

i
a
o jy
.ice \ a

JANUARY

SPECIALS
for FRIDAY and SATURDAY

50c Pepsodent Tooth Paste.... . .
60c Forhan's Tooth Paste ........
50c Mennen's Shaving Cream...
$1.00 Gillette Blades .... . 4.
$1 .00 Astringisol * . * . * *f*"*f* .*"4 *

.399
.43c
.39c
.69c
*79c

KOTEX
19c

KLEENEX
19c

MODESS
15c

5,,'

I

Camels, Chesterfields, Old Golds
and Lucky Strikes, now. .2 pkgs.
SW FT'S DRUG STORE
340 S. State St. Phone 3534

STARS
__&STRIPES
.. , ,eBy Karl Seiffert
A dish entitled "baby porcupines" in a radio
menu turns out to be nothing more mysterious
than good old meatballs. If this business keeps up
they'll be billing tripe as stewed prime armadillo

WE DELIVER

1 -11

steaks.

* *. *

SAYS COUNTRY IS READY
FOR TRADE REVIVAL
-Headline
Yeah, but there's no hurry. We're getting kind
of used to it now.
A bit of remarkable foresight seems to have
been exhibited by the Canadian would-be bride-
groom who cast about for someone to pay his
wedding expenses and finally hit upon the min-
ister of mines and labor.
Our old pal Brutus insists that there is
some significance in the fact that Dowager
Queen Marie of Rumania, in the face of re-
ports that she is going to publish a book tell-
ing "all" about King Carol's marital troubles,
has gone to visit Princess Ileana in the city
of Moedling.

e
s
/
i

2-1214
2-1214

2-1214
2-1214

2-1214
2-1214
2-.1214

2-1214 2-1214

-MIN

THE UNIVERSITY FLOWER SHOP, Inc.
Wishes to extend to you all a cordial welcome back to the Uni-
versity and trust that you have had a pleasant holiday. They
also desire to inform you that the choicest blooms to be found in
Ann Arbor or vicinity are procurable at all times. Roses ranging
in price from $1.00 up. They are headquarters for gardenias.
Their stock is always fresh and beautiful.
Their arrangements are outstanding for corsages, shoulder
bouquets, table decorations, ballroom decorations and, in fact,
anything for which flowers are used.
"'They Grow Their Own"
UNIVERSITY FLOWER SHOP, Inc.
606 E. Liberty St. Phone 9055
Member of the Florist's Telegraph Association

REPRESENTATIVE STUDENT GOVERNMENT
To the Editor:
Why give up the fight? Of coure student gov-
ernment at the University of Michigan is a sham,
but so is popular government in Chicago, New
York, Philadelphia, and Boston. Is that sufficient
reason to give up the fight for a significant
democracy?
* There are two lines of attack: the first one-
proportional representation to the Student Coun-
cil-may seem at first glance to be a mere form.
It is much more than that; -it is the sine non quo
of democracy; it is the only scheme of exact
functional representation along lines automatical-
ly determined by the electorate itself. The voter
begins to feel that his vote counts and for the
first time he takes an aggressive interest. Pro-
portional representation has enabled the intelli-
gent and progressive people of Cincinnati to wrest
control of their city from the hands of machine
politicians and to set an example for the whole
country.
At the University of Michigan, proportional
representation would assure serious minorities a
place on the council-any dormatory, any class,
any religious group (Wesley Guild, Neuman
Club, Hillel Foundation, etc.), the Socialist group,
and yes, even a group of fraternities could elect
their man (women too should be on this council).

I

TRIMMED
Be sure that when you have
your hair cut and trimmed that
you are not trimmed otherwise.
Your personal appearance is an
important consideration that
you cannot slight.
You should demand that your
hair be carefully cut and not of
a "trimmed" quality.
ARCADE
BARBER SHOP
In the Arcade

U. S. EXPENDITURES
SMALLER THIS YEAR

-Headline
And 1933 will be even more of a banner year.
Down in Albuquerque, N. M., two federal employes
drawing a dollar a year apiece have been dis-
charged from their positions in the U. S. employ-
ment office "in the interests of economy."
Listing the name of a Los Angeles press
agent as being in the cosmetics business has
subjected the Southern California Telephone
Co. to a $520,000 damage suit. Representatives
of the paint and powder interests have seem-
ingly agreed to settle out of court.
The Detroit speakeasy operators who were
raided the other night by hijackers masquerad-
ing as police officers have only themselves to

I

L

-

I I 1

FOR YOUR DESK-yon will need a
HANDY DES K CALENDAR
DIARY or APPOINTMENT BOOK

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan