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January 04, 1933 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
blication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to alln members of the
.versity. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until
0; 11:30 a. m. Saturday.

. XLIII

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1933

No. 711

NOTICES
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be at home to the students of the Uni-
versity on the first two Wednesday afternoons of each month from four,
to sik o'clock.
Apparatus Exchange: The Regents at their meeting in March, 1927,
authorized an arrangement for the sale of scientific apparatus by one de-
partment to another, the proceeds of the sale to be credited to the bud-
get account of the department from which the apparatus is transferred.
Departments having apparatus which is not in active use are advised
to send description therof to the University Chemistry Store, of which Pro-
fessor R. J. Carney is Director. The Chemistry Store headquarters are in
Room 223 Chemistry building. An effort will be made to sell the apparatus
to other departments which are likely to be able to use it. In some instances
the apparatus may be sent to the University Chemistry Store on consign-
ment, and, if it is not sold within a reasonable time, it will be returned to
the department from which it was received. The object of this arrange-
ment is to promote economy by Teducing the amount of unused apparatus.
It is hoped that departments having such apparatus will realize the ad-
vantage to themselves and to the ,lniversity in availing: themselves- of this
opportunity. Shirley W. Smith
Air Transportation: Students who purchased air transportation from
W. K, Richards, Michigan Southern Airways Company, or the Detroit Air
Charter Service prior to the Christmas holidays, and who have not already
reported the matter to this office are requested to call at Room 2, Univer-
sity Hall, as soon as possible.. J. A. Bursley, Dean of Students
Summer Session Abridged Announcement: Copies of the Campus Edi-
tion of the Abridged Announcement of the courses to be given during the
summer of 1933 may now be obtained in the office of the Summer Session
and beginning tomorrow at the registration offices of all schools and col-
leges.
Faculty, School of Education: The regular January Faculty meeting
of the School of Education will be held at the Michigan League Building
Monday, January 9, at 12 o'clock. C. 0. Davis, Secretary
Twilight Organ Recital: Palmer Christian, University organist, will re-
sume the series of organ recitals beginning Wednesday, January 18, at 4:15
o'clock. Thereafter recitals will be given each Wednesday afternoon, unless
otherwise announced,
School of Education Qualifying Examinations: The next series of qual-
ifying examinations in subject matter required by the School of Education
will be held Saturday morning, January 14, in the auditorium of the Uni-
versity High School at 9 o'clock sharp. All students expecting to do directed
teaching next semester are required to, take one of these examinations. It
is highly desirable that such students shall consult immediately with the
instructor having charge of the special methods course in the subjects in
which he expects to do directed teaching. C. 0. Davis; Secretary

Need For Loan
Out B Ruthven
(Continued from Page )
that it is possible to develop an or-
ganization for large schools which
will insure a thoroughgoing faculty
participation as well as efficiency in
the administration of educational ac-
tivities.'
The report cited the new program
of religious education, which has
taken form in the past year in the
organization of select groups of un-
dergraduates who have been taken
to various centers where social prob-
lems are receiving attention. "By
means of conferences and seminars,
these students exchanged experiences
and ideas to broaden their concepts.
The aim of the project is not to train
professional social workers, but to
provide a background of practical ex-
perience which will make for a bet-
ter, because more intelligent, citizen-
ship, . . .If possible a counselor in
religion should be provided in the im-
mediate future. It is recommended
that he be attached to the President's
office to make clear that his is a gen-
eral service. He should be a man
qualified to coordinate for the stu-
dent the various approaches to life's
problems and to assist in adjusting
thosedifficulties which so often arise
in the process of spiritual growth."
The importance of organizing a
Michigan Law Alumni association was
eimphasized by Dean Henry M. Bates
of -the Law School, who stated that
plans for it would soon be presented
to the. President and the Board of
Regents. "Also," said Dean Bates,
"as has been indicated many times
before, we need large additional in-
come for the purpose of increasing
the size of our faculty, our collec-
tion of law books, and for expanding
the work of legal research."
Edward H. Kraus, dean of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy, urged that the
state of Michigan maintain its lead-
ership in the field of pharmacy by
raising the standards for admission
to the profession from two years of
professional collegiate training to
graduation from an accredited col-
lege of pharmacy, and recommended
that pressure be exerted on the state
legislature to secure legislation to
that end.

For the benefit of those students
who have been out of touch with
University activities for the past two
weeks a resume of events of interest
to students follows.
AEROPLANE AGENT SKIPS
Extreme excitement on the campus
the afternoon of Dec. 16 was the re-
sult of the disappearance of W. K.
Richards, promoter of the non-exist-
ent "Southern Michigan Airways,"
while many students jammed a State
street restaurant demanding their
rides home. Richards had arranged
to have the students taken to their
homes in planes of the Detroit Air
Charter Service, which did all in its
power to furnish the transportation
anyway.
Richards disappeared with money
that had been given by students as
deposits on the rides. He was cap-
tured the next morning, still in Ann
Arbor, and taken to the psychopathic
hospital for observation. More than
$800 had been turned in to Richards
as deposits, of which. $386 was paid
to the Detroit firm in advance on
the planes and the remainder spent.
Richards was kept in the hospital
for some time and is now ingcounty
jail awaiting a sanity hearing and a
trial on a charge of embezzling
money from a local gas station oper-
ator.
RUTHVEN GIVES VIEWS
Replying to the recommendation
of the state government expense in-
quiry commission that the income of
the University be made proportional

to the amount of taxes collected,
President Alexander G. Ruthven is-
sued a statement Dec. 22 pointing
out that such a measure would make
it almost impossible to manage the
finances of the University in an or-
derly way and would seriously affect
both the present and future status of
the institution.
"It is a profound mistake to as-
sume that a university can be run
like a manufacturing plant, cutting
production and hiring and firing
men from day to day, depending on
the current income. Under an uncer-
tain income," the president said,
"which the proportional appropria-
tion would give, depending on day to
day tax collections, we could not sign
a single contract, and University af-
fairs would shortly be reduced to
confusion."
NEXT YEAR'S ALL-AMERICAN
Ted Petoskey, '34, was described by
Coach Harry G. Kipke as "The best
end I have ever seen and he showed
his versatility by going into the back.-
field and helping us to go through
the season undefeated," at a testi-
monial dinner held in St. Charles,
Mich., Dec. 23.
Coach Kipke also revealed that he
had recommended Petoskey for the
end position on one All-American
team and said that he believed he
would be All-American material at
the end of next fall.
HOLIDAY HOP
More than 175 couples attended
the second annual Holiday Hop, a

Vacation Happenings In Ann Arbor

subscription
League.-

dance Dec: 26 at theI

BACTERIOLOGISTS CONVENE
Bacteriologists from all parts of
the country more than 250 strong as-
sembled here Dec. 28 for the thirty-
fourth annual meeting of the Society
of American Bacteriologists. The
meeting this year was to commemo-
rate the three hundredth anniver-
sary of Anthony Van Leeuwenhoek,
the inventor of the microscope.
Among the developments brought
out at the convention were a hay
fever treatment by a new "rusting"
process developed by George E.
Rockwell of the University of Cin-
cinnati; a suggestion that radio short
waves are deadly to germs of the
dangerous typhoid group; and a pos-
sible chemical explanation for the
nature of mysterious rays emitted
from the human body and deadly to
dangerous disease germs, reported
by Prof. Otto Rahn of Cornell Uni-
versity.
DEGENER COMPETES IN MIAMI
Meanwhile Dick Degener, '34 na-
tional -A. A. U. indoor high-board
diving champion, was in Miami tak-
ing. part in a three-day national

Olympic stars meet at the Miami
Biltmore Country Club.
Among the other prominent swim-
mers who took part were Katherine
Rawls, Georgia Coleman, Helen
Meany, and Marshall Wayne, Florida
state diving champion.
NEWMAN HONORED AGAIN
Harry Newman, '33, Varsity quar-
terback, was picked as the most val-
uable football player in the United
States under the all-players' Alil-
American rating system of Norman
L. Spears and Howard Jones on Dec.
30.
Under this system football players
from every major university and col-
lege in the country rate the various
players they have opposed during the
year as to speed, interference, block-
ing, carrying, pass catching, defense,
diagnosing, aggressiveness, kicking,
generalship, and charging.
GET VALUABLE MANUSCRIPT
It was announced Dec. 30 that the
Clements Library has acquired an
unpublished manuscrip of Chief Jus-
tice John Marshall. The manuscript
is in Justice Ma'rshall's own hand-
writing and in book form would
make about 60 pages.

CLASSES STARTING
TYPING-SHORTHAND----- BOOKKEEPING
SPECIAL TUITION RATES
DAY AND EVENING COURSES
General Business - Stenographic - Private Secretarial
ANN ARBOR SECRETARIAL SCHOOL
205 South State Street Phone 3330

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

---a

9
_. -
_. - .

To All Men Students: Students intending to change their rooms at the
id of the present semester are hereby reminded that according to the Uni-
rsity .Agreements they are to inform the householders of such intention
least two weeks prior to the close of the semester, that is by January 27.
is advised that notice of such intention to move be made at once.
F. B. Wahr, Assistant Dean

,!

Householders: Householders having rooms for men students available
for the second semester are requested to list them in the office -of the Dean
of Students, Room 2, University Hall, as soon as possible. Dial 6115.
Available light-housekeeping rooms and apartments should also be
listed. F. B.- Wahr, Assistant Dean
ACADEMIC NOTICES
English 181: This class will not meet today.:
Economics 51: The Wednesday Lecture Section (Section ID will not
meet this week.
Geology 31: Bluebook Friday at the lecture hour. A-L (inclusive) meet
in Room 25 A.H. M-Z meet in Room 2082 N.S., the Mineralogical Lecture
Room. All laboratory sections will meet next week.
EVENTS TODAY
Chemistry Colloquium will meet in Room 303 Chemistry Building at
4:00 p. m. Professor R. K. McAlpine will speak on ''Determniation of Moist-
ure Blank."
Botanical Seminar meets at 4:30, Room 1139, N.S. Bldg. Paper by E. B.
Mains--"Host specialization in the -.rust of Iris.'
Chemical Engineering Seminar: Mr. H. V. Nyland will be the speaker
at the Seminar at 4 o'clock in Room 3201 E. Eng. Bldg., on the subject, "De-
sign of Fractionating Columns for Complex Mixtures."
Zeta Phi Eta: Attendance is required for iniation service in the League
at 7:30 tonight. Watch for schedule of play rehearsals.
Freshmen Men's Glee Club will meet at 5:00 p. m. in the Musical Activ-
ities Room in the Union.
University Girls' Glee Club usual weekly rehearsal at the League at 7:30
p. m. in their Glee Club room.
Gargoyle Business and Editorial Staffs: Meeting of tryouts and mem-
bers of both the business and editorial staffs at 3:00 o'clock.
Michiganensian Editorial Tryouts: All men and women interested in
trying out for the editorial staff of the Michiganensian report to the Press
bldg. at 3 o'clock,
Presbyterian Young Peoples Society: Afternoon tea from 4:30 to 5:30
Cabinet dinner at 6 p. m. this evening at the church house. Come early.
COMING EVENTS
Special Assembly for all 'students enrolled in Education classes in the
University High School Auditorium at 4:10, Thursday,. January 5. The pro-
giam will be presented by students in the Correlated Course.
Sociology Department: The first meeting of the Earhart Foundation
Seminar will be Wednesday, January 11.
Observatory Journal Club will meet at 5:15 Thursday, January 5, in the
[I

Ge rnm-ental
Reform Causes
Disagreem cnt
(Continued from Page 1)
dations of Professors Reed and Bro-
mage are to be made.
Three other of the elevent surveys
were directed by members of the
University faculty. The study of the
organization and administration of
public health has been headed by Dr.
Nathan Sinai, of the public health
department of the medical school.
Prof. John S. Worley, of the engi-
neering school, has directed the sur-
vey of the organization and adminis-
tration of public works.' The organ-
ization and administration of justice,
particularly in the Justice of the
Peace courts, has been investigated
under the direction of Prof. Edson
R. Sunderland, of the law school.
The reports of Professor Sunder-
land and Dr. Sinai have not yet been
made. Professor Worley has recom-
mended through the commission
that all of the county road commis-
sions be abolished and a county en-
gineer created. This latter -official
would be responsible for the mainte-
nance of all roads, drains, highways
(other than State trunk lines) and
parks within the county. The drain
commissioner and the office of parks
commissioner w o u 1 d thereby be
abolished.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at three
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
eox numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-11e per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.'
14c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion..
Minimum three lines per insertion.
BY contract, per Iine-2 lines daily, one
m~onth..............8c
4 lines E. 0. D., '2 months.........8c
2 lines daily; college year..........7e
4 lines E. 0. D., college year...... 7
100 ,ines used as desired.........
300lines used as desired.........c
1,000 lines used as cesired.......... 7c
2,000 lines used as desired........
The above rates are per reading lne,
based on eigInt reading, lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and " iower case. Add
6c per line to above-atfor all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10 aper line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point type.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-First floor, four large
rooms refinished like new. Heat,
water, stove, electric refrigeration,
garage. 811- S. State. 224
FOR RENT-Room $3.00 single or
$2.50 double. Near Angell Hall.
Board if desired. Telephone 6404.
225
TWO-Furnished apartments. Spe-
- cial price to large group. Available
now or second semester. Dial 8544.
4422 E. Washington. 217
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - Soft water. 2-1044.
Towels free. Socks darned. 13c
WASHING-And ironing. Called for
and delivered. Silks and woolens
guaranteed satisfactory. 2-3478.
611 Hoover. 15c
LOST
LOST-Black cocker puppy. Answers
to name "Skippy". Reward. Dial
8125. 223
-.1

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Scottish terrier pup.
Ardmore strain. Phone 2-3462.
814 Hill Street. 221
FINANCE CO.-Is selling late model
cars for balance due. 311 W: Huron.
2-2001. 19c.
NOTICE
HOME-Cooked meals $4 a week.
Tables for ladies. 609 E. University.
-222
SEASONAL SUGGESTIONS - Wall
paper, paint. Samples, estimates.
Home Decorators since 1905. Dial
8107 or 7600.A30c
WANTED
WANTED - Five college girls and
boys. Spare time, good salary.
Write N. O. Green, 1002 5. Clayton
Street, Bloomington, Ill.
TYPING-Grad. theses a specialty.
M. V. Hartsuff, 9067. 40c
TYPING-Notes, papers; and Grad.
Theses. C. Heckart, 3423. 35c
Some birds will eat 100 or more
insects at a meal, says the Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and, if the in-
sects are small, may devour several
thousands.

F

SUDDIEN
SERVICE

xj

, _..

~-~v

7W-
Aft -
T T
aol t

MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO.

mmms;Ak ,

Iajest ic
STARTING T OAY.
Tiffany Thayer's
Startling Novel

I

Al

IS ANY WOMAN SAFE- FROM
THE SPELL OF SUCH A WOMAN7

Observatory lecture room. Dr. A. D.
Maxwell will speak on the subject
"Some Innovations in Orbit Meth-
ods." Tea will be served at 3:45.
Theosophy: E. Norman Pearson of
Detroit, president of the Michigan
Theosophical Federation, and trustee
of the American Theosophical So-
ciety, will address the open meeting
of the Ann Arbor Theosophical Lodge
Friday, January 6, at 8 p. m. Mich-
igan League, on the subject of THE
SCIENCE OF CIVILIZATION. The
public is cordially invited to attend.
T Y P E W R I TING
~ItEO-G-TAPH.1NG
Iromptly and neatly done in
our o n shop 'y1 c metent
o era tars a mnodera teraes.
14 S. State St.,Ann Arbor.

TELEPHONE HOME
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF LOW
EVENING AND NIGHT RATES
WHEN CONVENIENT

chig ant
ENDS TONIGHT

Two Demons of Speed

Below are shown Day, Evening and Night Station-
to-Station Long Distance telephone rates from Ann
Arbor to representative points.

WILLIAM
HAINES

CLIFF
EDWARDS

LU

A lil Arbor to:

Iay
7 :00 A.M.)

FAST

LIFE"

EXTRA

LOUISE
FAZENDA

MARIE
PREVOST

Battle Creek.-...$ .60
Chicago 1.05
Detroit.............30
Fint .45
Grand Rapids ..... .80
Houghton . . . . . 2.00
Jackson . ... .30
kafamfiazoo 70
Laning...........445
Monroe .. ... . .30,
New York ......:. 2.15
Port Huron .... .60

Evening
('l:00 P.M.-
8:30 P.M.
$ .45
.90
.30
.35
.60
1.50
.30
.55
.35
.30
1.80
.45

Night
8:30 P.M.
4:30 A.M.
$ .35
.60
.30
.35
.40
1.00
.30
.35
J35
.30
1.20
.35

CLASSES t
NOW FORMING
STENOTYPY
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
CALCULATOR
DICTAPHONE
SElCRETARIAL

25 to 50 Per Cent Off

1 1l

Laurel & Hardy Comedy

"Hesitating Love"
ALEXANDER GRAY

on GIFTS
(Nothing Reserved)

"Their First Mistake"

"'Red Shadow"If

PARAMOUNT NEWS

11

PWaCARTOON IN COLORAhc

When the

charge for u call is SOc or more,

III

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