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December 15, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FICIAL BULLETIN
tin is constructive notice to all members of the
at the office of the Assistant to the President until

Umemploye Demonstrators Halted By Capitol Police

a. in. Satwiv

TIURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1932

No 691

NOTICES
University Broadcasting Service-Thursday, Dec. 15 at 2 p. m. "The
y of Humperdink-or the Santa Claus of Music," a dramatic story pre-
Od by the students of the School of Music.
The Automobile Regulation will be lifted at 12:00 o'clock noon on Fri-
December 16, and will be resumed at 8:00 o'clock Tuesday morning,
nary 3. W. B.- Rea, Assistant to the Dean of Students
University Bureau of Appointments and Occupational Information:
ents enrolled for teaching positiois are herewith reminded that their
rds must be complete by January 14. Any candidate may check up on
completeness of his record by inquiring at the office, 201 Mason Hall,
31ling. University 489.
Final Examination Schedule, Colleges of L. S. & A. and Pharmacy,
ols of Education, Music, Business Ad., Forestry and the Graduate
Each course in the College of L. S. & A. and in the School of Music has
given a group letter for examinationpurposes. Many courses appear-
.nthe announcement of the Graduate School carry these group letters

Third Michigan
Man, Possible
Rhodes Winner
Turner, Fraternity Head,
Selected To Represent
Wyoming In Final Test
Edwin T. Turner, Jr., '3 C presi-
dent of the Inter-Frate n council
and a member of the Varsity track
team, is a third prospective Rhodes
Scholar* from Michigan, according to
reports received from Laramie, Wyo.
Turner flew to Laramie last week-
end to take the elimination examina-
tions to select those who will repre-
sent Wyoming in the fiial examina -
tion to select the foui district win-
ners of the scholarships. Turner is a
native of the state of Wyoming and
was successful in the firAt examina-
dion held Saturday, being one of the

The meetings of the Mineralogical
Society of America and of the Geo-
logi al Society of America to be held
at Harvard University from Dec. 27
to De. 30 will be addrepsed by three
University of Michigan faculty men.
Dean Edwar H. Kraus, head of
the department of mineralogy, Prof.
Chester 13. Slawson off the mineralogy
department, and Walter F. Hunt,
professor of petrology, will attend
these meetings at which each is to
speak.
Professor Hunt has been editor of
the American Mineralogist, official
publication of the Mineralogical So-
ciety of Amderica, for several years.
two s°4ected to go to the finals in
Spokane Wash.
Winners of six other state elimina-
tions will compete with those from
Wyoming at, Spokane and from them
will be chosen the four men who will
be ,warded the honor.

-.U4 s,in
Attend Sc

OUP DATEOF EXAM.
A T1ues. P. MW, Jan. 7
Be Tues. A. M., Jan. 31
C Mon, P. M., Jan. 30
fj Sat. P. M., Feb. 4
E Sat. A. M., Feb. 4
F Wed. A. M., Feb. 8
G Tues. A. M., Feb. 7

GROUP DATEOFEXAM

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

J
K
L
N
O
P

Fri.
Fri.
Mon.
Mon.
Sat.
Wed..
Tues.

P.
A.
A.
P.
P.
P.

Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.,

3
3
30
6
28
1
31

(Associated Press Photo)
Policestopped, unemployed delonstrators when they arrived at Washington to lay their case before Con-
gress, The marchers came from the four corners of the country. One eastern outfit brought a band which
was- to have a prominent role in, a parade beforethe capitol; members of the band are shown at the right.
On the left is one of the demonstrators' trucks with a Blazing poster, pointed out by Helmi Huttunen of
Seattle (at left of banner).

Wed. A. M., Feb, 1 Q Thurs. P. M., Feb. 2
Thurs. A. M., Feb. 2 R Mon. P. M. Feb. 6
Each course in Group X may be examined at any time mutually
agreed upon by class and instructor.
courses not carrying the group letters will be examined as fol-

oe
Soology Professor FdsOld
County School Record, Booke

DATE OF EXAMS.

CLASSES

DATE OF EXAMS.

at
at
at
at
at

8
9.
10
11
1
2
3:

Tues. P.M.,
Tues. A.M.,
Mon. P.M.,
Sat. P.M.,
Sat. A.M.,
Wed. A.M.,
Tues. A.M.,

Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

7
31
30
4
4
7

Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues
Tues.
Tues,.

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11.
1.
2
3

Wed. A.M.,
Thurs. A.M.,
Fri. P.M.,
Fri. A.M.,
Mon A.M.,
Mon. A.M.,
Sat. P.M.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.

1
2
3
3
30
6
28

Further, the courses listed below will be examined as follows:
Educaton A-1, Monday p. m., February 6.
Education B-20, Thursday p. m., February 2. -.
Zda'cation C-1, Saturday p. m., January 28.
B siness Administration 101, Wednesday p. rn., February 1
Business Administration 111,'Monday a. m., January 30.
Business Admnistration 121, Tuesday p. m., January 31.
Business Administration 151, Monday a. m., February 6.
$usiness Administration 161, Thursday p. m., February 2.
1iistess Ad inistration 205, Monday p. m., February 6.
EXAMINATION HOURS.--A.M., 9-12; P.M., 2-5.
Any class not included in the above schedule may be examined at any
AMon which the instructor and the class concerned may agree.
tgeh student taking practical work in music in the School of Music
Ill be giien an individual examination. All such students should report to
" off1ce of the Director of Music, and sign up, on blanks now available
e, for a specified examination period.
Iegular class work will continue until Saturday Noon, Jan. 28.
M.s-Mlchigan Club: All students who are going on the special busses
e requested to be at' Chubb's promptly at twelve-twenty (12:20) Friday,
rch passenger is allowed as much luggage as he can carry.
If you have not made reservations as yet, please do so at once at
iubb's.
Pra ternities and organizations who have not signed space contracts for
33 Michiganensian please call at Press Building before 3 p. m. Friday.
ACADEMIC NOTICES
Astronomy 32, speetrohelioscope observations, Thursday from 2:00 to
* pn m. in Room 500& Angell lall, if sky is clear.
Plys y 21, Sec. I and Sec. II will not meet today.
GeChan: Reading Requirements i German for Ph.D. Candidates:
"a"1date in' all fIleld except those of the natural. sciences and mathema-
m rhay obtain the official certification of an adaquate reading knowledge
German only by submitting to a written examination given by a com-
ftbt ot the German Department. Such examinations will be. held on. in
thi-d week- of each semester and towards the end of Summer School.
detrts who intend to take the examination are requested to register their
dtzbs ahd their departments at the beginning' of the semester at the Ger-
an Department, Room 204 U.H., where detailed information with regard
-enitnation requirements will be given.
LECTURE
University Lecture: Thursday, December 1, 4:15 p. n.,. Room 303
Leni trTBuilding. Dr. F. W. Sullivan, Jr., of the Standard Oil Company,
444a; "The Applications of Organic Chemistiy to: the Petroleum In-
EVENTS TODAY
Appliedi Mechanics Colloquium: M. D. K. Kazarinoff will give a paper
"Some Problems of Dynamics of a Rigid Body." Prof. H. R. Lloyd will
e a review of the book on "Gyrodynamics." Meeting will be held in
om 445 West Engineering Building, at 7:30 p. m. Those interested are
dially invited to attend.
Observatory Journal Club meets at 4:15 in the Observatory lecture
'.. Dr. Dean. B. McLaughlin. will speak on the subject of Recent Work
Inegular Variable Stars. Tea will be served at 3:45.
PoLtoIlcaI Science Journa Clubmeets at 3 p. m. in the Political Science
tinar.
e lloieal Journal Club. regular meeting Thursday,. Dec. 15, at 8:00
mu, in Room 4056 N.S
Quadnngle Club: Regular meeting at 8:15 p. in. at 7118 Onondaga.-
fessor C. F. Remer will speak on "The International Debt Problem."
Po4onim Circle meeting at the League at 7:30 p. m. A special programI
aeing planned.l
Varsity Glee Club meets promptly at 7:30 in the Glee Club Rooms,
,higan Union.'
Michigan Interpretive Arts Society: Open Meeting. The next meet-I
will be held at 7:30 in Room 302 Mason Hall. Several students will give

By A. ELLIS BALL
In carrying on a study of rural
communities recently, Prof. Roy H,
Holmes of the sociology department
came across an aged school record
from Livingston county. The book
is the property of Howard H. Jones,
of Fenton, Mich., and was kept for
over 50 years by various members of
succeeding school boards.
The first entry in the book was
April 17, 1888. At that time, accord-
ing to Professor Holmes, school was
probably held in some private home.
The first mention of a district school
building is in 1842, when the school
year was nine months long.
"It is generally thought that the
length of most district school terms
was short at the beginning and then
gradually lengthened," P r of e s s o r
Holmes said. "However, according to
the school record, the case is just
the opposite."
Short Sessions Adopted
Nine month sessions were held un-
til 1848whn they were shortened to
eight months which were divided
into winter rand summer terms. The
winter term lasted four months and
the summer term began the latter
part of May and ran until Septem-
ber, the record shows. The summer
session formed a regular part of the
school year, and the board provided
that a- man should teach in the win-
ter and a woman in the summer.
In 1860 the school year was again
shortened to six months - three
months in the winter and three in
the summer. A few years later the
length of the term was left up to the
discretion of the school board. From
1888 until the date of the last entry,
Sept. 4; 1893, the school year re-
mained eight months long. In 1888,
however, it was moved by the board
to hold school nine months a year
and the motion was voted down.

Perhaps one of the most striking
and interesting items found in the.
school record, according to Professor
Holmes, is the mention of wood for
the school house stove. At each
meeting of the board it was voted,
how much wood would be necessary.
At the beginning it was ordered that
"inhabitants sending to school half
a cord per scholar," to use the origi-
nal illiterate words.
Beard Tekes Precautions
To assure the school of fuel, the
board further resolved "that there be
no schollar be admitted to said school
unless they advance their quota of
wood." In 1844 it was voted to hold
the parents responsible for the break-
ing of glass in the school house, but
apparently that rule was not en-
forced. A new pane could be bought
for three cents.
The board was more particular in
1846, and decided that if the scholar
had not furnished his half cord of
wood by the 'first .of' January he
would be liable for the money, 25
cents. A few years later the teacher
had to measure each cord. In 18541
one man brought enough wood to
last the winter and it was paid for
out of the county taxes. However,
the record stated that it had to be
"good body wood, hard timber, and
white oak."
Needed A Dictionary
A motion to obtain a dictionary for
the school was made in 1847, but was
defeated. Judging from the spelling
in the record, the dictionary was
never purchased. One passage reads
"Moved and supported that we pro-
seed to an informal ballot for Mod-
erator the hull No of voats cast was
9." Another entry dated 1888:
"Meaton called to order-Direettor
report read and Exseptted."

Boethius Lectures'
About Conditions
iAncient Rowel
Lecturing on "Domestic Architec-
ture in Imperial Rome," Dr. Alex
Boethius, director of the Swedish
School in Rome, yesterday traced the
development of this type of building
as revealed through recent excava-
tions. The lecture was illustrated by
lantern slides.
Contrast between the houses of the
poorer classes and the palaces of the-
rich was brought out by Dr. Boeth-
ius. Although great attention was
paid to ornamenting the dwellings of
the rich, the poor people in Roman
times were allowed to live in the
squalid conditions typical of slums
of all ages.
Dr. Boethius, who is regarded as
one of the leading archeologists of
today, has made outstanding con-
tributions to new data which is being
gathered on Roman architecture,
and has written several books on the
subject. This year he is the Charles
E. Norton lecturer of the Archeologi-
cal Institute of America.
Former Faculty Member
To Speak On Chemistry
Dr. F. W. Sullivan, Jr., who re-
,3eived his doctor of philosophy de-
;ree in organic chemistry here and
was formerly a member of the chem-
istry faculty, will return to Ann
Arbor today to speak on "Applica-
tions of Organic Chemistry to the
Petroleum Industry." The lecture
will be given at 4:15 p. m. in Room
303 Chemistry Building, it was an-
nounced.
Dr. Sullivan resigned his position
here to join the staff of the Standard
Oil Company at Whiting, Ind., and
is now director of research in their
laboratories. In his talk he will dis-
cuss the relation between constitu-
tion and physical properties of lub-
ricating oils, and also the work; his.
firm has done in regard to anti-oxi-
dents in gasolines.
OFFER READING LISTS
A reading list for children drawn
up by Edith Thomas of the Library
Extension will be distributed free of
charge to all who ask for copies,
Prof. Waldo M. Abbotdirector of the
University Broadcasting Service, an-
nounced yesterday.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The cassified columns close at three
o'clock= previous 1.0 day of insertion.
B;ox numbei may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-Ho per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
10c per reading line for three or more
1insertions.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or
more. insertions
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the. date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines pertinsertion.
By contract per line-2 lines daily, one
month...............8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months........c
2 lines daily, college year........
4 lines ._l0 . I,, college year........ 7c
100 linres used as desired:.. ...9.c
300 lines used as desired... ...8c
1,000 lines used, as desired ......... 7c
2,00 limesused as:desired........c
The above rates are per reading lie,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capi-
tal letters. Add c pe rIne to above
for bold face, upper and lower case.
Add 10c per line, toabove rates for bold
face capital letters.
The above rates are for 7,1 point
LOST
LOST - Silver pencil, with name
B. F. Rose, lost last week. Finder
please phone 7117. ' 213
LOST-Between Arcade and Jordan,
rectangular wrist watch crystal,
white gold; frame. Call Jordan desk.
214
FURNITURE-Repairing, refinishing;
and upholstering. A, A. Stuhlmann,
1308 Henry St. Dial 8105. 215,
LOST-Tan double breasted topcoat
at Alpha Delt party Friday night.
Finder please call 23171. Reward.
212
LAUNDRIES_
LAUNDRY - Soft water. 2-1044.
Towels free. Socks darned. 13c
WASHING- -And ironing. Called for
and delivered. Silks and woolens
guaranteed satisfactory. 2-3478.
611 Hoover. 15c
FOR RENT
TWO-Furnished apartments. Spe-
cial price to large group. Available
now or second semester. Dial 8544.
4422 E. Washington. 217
FOR R ENT --Two i-ooms~ with p-
vate bath and shower, Near (c-
pus. Very reasonahle. 520 N. State.
208

NOTICE
NOICE-Student wishes ride to
Chic~ go. Friday on share expense
basis, Call Bob at 6017.
S. U.--Shoe Repair Shop. Repairing
whie you wait. Reasonable prices.
Hats cleaned and blocked. Shoes
shined open evenings. 199c
IT IS NOT' OO LATE to order
ChrLiLmas cards. Our greeting card
dept. is large and complete. Fran-
cisco Boyce. 723 N. Univ. 29
BARGAINS--overstuffed chairs $3.00
to $9.00. Davenports $10.00. Study
tables $2.00. Lamps $1. A & C Fur-
niture, 325 S. Fifth Ave. 22c
EAST MEETS WEST
In International Bazaar
LANE HALL
Dec. 12-17 Open 9 A.M.-9 P.M.
Turkish Coffee Served
211
DRIVING-To Washington, D. C.
over vacation. Call 8240. 209
NOTICE-If you are driving home
and wish to take passengers with
you so that the cost of the trip 'will
be minimized call AL the AD-
TAKER, 2-1214. -MICHIGAN
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS.
SEASONAL SUGGESTIONS- Wall
paper, paint. Samples, estimates.
Home Decorators since 1905. Dial
8107 or 7600. 30c
WANTED
WANTED-Two or three to share ex-
penses on trip to Philadelphia and
return. Over Xmas vacation. Call
2-1214. Box 7 B 195
WANTED-General housework, pri-
vate or fraternity cooking, etc. Call
6109. 216
TYPING-Grad. theses a specialty.
M. V. Hartsuff. 9087. 40c
TYPING--Notes, papers, and Grad.
rTheses. C. IHeckart. 3423. 35c
Among the historic patent applica-
tions in the U. S. patent office is one
issued to Abraham Lincoln in 1948 on
,"mode of buoying vessels."
1)E T R 1T tER S
SEE IAST PAGE
MAkJESTIC.
Today -Friday!
-i

a recital from Dicken's "A Christmas Carol." The program will last about
an hour. The public is cordially invited to attend this open meeting.
Michiganensian Women's Business Staff: Important meeting of all
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior tryouts at 4 p. m.
Billiards: Instruction every Thursday at 2 o'clock by Mr. Williamson,
in the games room of the Michigan League.
Jewish Students who are going to remain in Ann Arbor over the vaca-
tion, please meet at the Hillel Foundation at 4:30 p. m. Plans for a party
will be made at that time. C
Church, corner of East Washington
Lutheran Student Club: Members and Fifth Avenue. Work will begin
wishing to attend the Christmas as soon after lunch as possible. If
Carolling Party, be at the Zion Lu- you can assist, your help will be ap-
theran Parish Hall at 7:45 tonight. preciated.

FOR SALE

C

r

11

'-1

FINANCE CO.-Is selling late model
cars for balance fue. 311 W. Huron,
2-2001. 19C
NOW SHOWING

After carolling, the party will con-
tinue at the Stein's Farm where en-
tertainment and refreshments will be
had. Transportation will be furnish-
ed.
COMING EVENTS
Sophomore Medical Elections will
be held Friday, December 16, at 11
a. m. East Ampitheatre of West
Medical Bldg.
Cosmopolitan Club: Dr. and Mrs.
Frederick B. Fisher 'have invited
members of the club and their friends
to attend a Christmas party to be
held in their home at 1430 Cam-
bridge Road on Friday evening, De-
cember 16, at eight o'clock.
Michigan Dames: Christmas boxes
for the University Hospital will be
filled next Wednesday afternoon, De-
cember 21, at the Zion Lutheran

CAMPUS TRAVEL BUREAU
GREYHOUND LINES
Final Reservation8
Today
N. Y... $16.95 rd. trip
Buffalo $5.95 rd. trip
Chicago $5.00 rd. trip
Tickets and Information
to All Points
CHUBB'S - 12-8 P. M.
GREY*UND

~1
GIVE-
STATIONERY
The Thoughtful
Personal Gift
Holiday Boxes
1.00 up
O. D
MORRILL

"~Evenings
For- Sale" Pn ofEirr
VOD mg ew*

c par iung omance
of Continental Flavor

CHARLES R UGGLES
Sari Maritza Mary Boland
"Hollywood Runaround"
Monty Collins Comedy
"TEE FOR TWO"
Musical Brevity
PARAMOUNT NEWS
EXTRA!
Special Owl Feature at Last Show

around the corner
SIns here!"

BUS INFORMATION

YPSILANTI NORMAL COLLEGE CHOIR
200 Voices Singing Alla Cappella
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor

Starring that grandgat Marie
DRESSLER

ant TICKE~T'

11'

I I Tko '1".1 1,

I

11

I

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