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September 29, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 29, 1932

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

m _.

Yankees Defeat
Cubs 12-6; Take
Series Opener

Box Score

Wildness Of Bush
Yanks On Scoring
In Sixth Inning

Starts
Spree

NEW YORK AB
Combs, of ........4
Sewell, 3b ........4
Ruth, rf.........3
Gehrig, lb ........4
Lazzeri, 2b.......4
Dickey, a............3
Chapman, if ......4
Crosetti, ss .......3
Ruffing, p .........4

R
2
3
3
1
0
1
1
0

H
2
1
1
2
1
0
0
a

P0
3
2
1
7
1
11
1
0
1

A
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
3

E
0
0,
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

Gehrig Hits Homer
Ruffing Strikes Out 11
Bats men; Hurls Tight
Baseball In Pinches
(Continued from Page 1)
base line. That was the last of the
scoring.
A crowd of 51,000 people braved
descending rain to watch the opener.
Mayor McKee, New York's Irish shy-
lock, received a tremendous hand
when he threw the first ball to um-
pire Bill Klem. It was a strike.
Guy Bush had rotten luck. He
yielded but three hits up to his re-
moval in the sixth. Manager Grimm
watched him walk four men and
called for Grimes, the greatest money
pitcher in baseball. Grimes was re-
moved for a pinch hitter in the
eighth, Bob Smith taking the mound.
Although Charlie Ruffing, New
York pitcher, struck out the side in
the first inning, Chicago scored two
runs. Billy Herman singled and
came all the way home when Ruth
let English's hit get by him for a
two base error. Stephenson's single
scored Englishi The Yankees went
down in order.
The Cubs failed to reach first base
in the second inning, as did the Yan-
kees. Cuyler singled and stole with
two men out in the third, but Ste-
phenson's fly ended the inning. New
York again went out without a man
reaching base. Chapman made a
beautiful running catch of Bill -Her-
man's long fly in the fourth. It
choked off a scoring threat as the
bases were full at the time.
Earl Combs walked to start a New
York uprising in the fourth. He
took' second on Sewell's out and
scored when Babe Ruth shot a single
to right. Lou Gehrig then ham-
mered a home run high into the
right field bleachers, driving Ruth
home ahead of him. Two of the
three Chicago batsmen in the fifth
inning struck out, the third raising
a fly to center field.
Double Play Ends Spree
Although the first two New York
batsmen in the fifth were safe, a
rapid-fire double play, Herman to
Koenig to Grimm, killed any scor-
ing chance. Manager Charlie Grimm
walked with one man down in the
Cub half of the sixth. Hartnett
fanned as Ruffing's eighth victim,
however, and Lazzeri threw out Koe-
nig to retire the side.
Bush lost control and walked Se-
well, Ruth, and Gehrig to fill the
bases in the sixth. After Lazzeri
popped, Dickey bounced a hit over
second, scoring the first two run-
ners. Chapman rolled to Herman,
but Gehrig beat the throw to the
plate with the third Yankee run of
the frame. Crosetti walked, again
filling the bases. Grimes then re-
placed Bush in the box for Chi-
cago. Ruffing's. hit to Koenig re-
WRESTLING CANDIDATES
Candidates for the V a r s i t y
wrestling team will meet in the
Union at 8 p. m. today.

Totals .........33 12 8 27 7 2I

CHICAGO
Herman, 2b ...
English, 3b ...
Cuyler, rf .....
Stephenson, If
Moore, cf .....
Grimm, lb:...
Hartnett, c
Koenig, ss ..
Bush, p.....
Grimes, p.
Smith, p.....
*Gudat......
Totals .....
Batted for
Ding.

AB R
....5 2
. .4 1
. .. ..5 1
. .5 0
....4 0
. .3 0
4..5 1
1 0
1 0
0 0
1 0

H
2
1
1
3
0
0
2
0
0
0
0

PO
1
2
2
2
1
8

A
2
1
0
0
1
2
2
0
0
0

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0

...38 6 1
Grimes inA

24 11 1
ighth in-

Chicago 2 0 0 0
New York .. . .0 0 0 3

0 !220-6
0 3 1x-12

sulted in Dickey's be' g forced at
homeplate, but Comb delivered a
base hit scoring Crose ci and Chap-
man. Sewell ended he inning by
forcing Combs.
The Cubs tallied a in in the sev-
enth. Herman sing d and reached
third when Crose i muffed Cuy-
ler's grounder with two out. Ste-
phenson lined a hit past third, scor-
ing both runners. Moore then walked.
Grimm bounded to Rufling, however,
to end the rally.
Yanks Score Again
Ruth again walked to start the
seventh and went to third on Geh-
rig's hit to left. Lazzeri beat out a
hit to Herman, scoring Ruth. Dick-
ey was struck on the right leg by
a pitched ball, filling the bases. Geh-
rig scored as Chapman flied to
Moore. After Crosetti forced Dick-
ey, Lazzeri scored on a wild pitch,
but Crosetti was out trying to reach
third on the play.
Hartnett got his second double
of the game to start the eighth.
Koenig then tripled to center, scor-
ing him. Marvin Gudat batted for
Grimes and was called out on strikes.
Gehrig knocked down Herman's drive
and threw to Ruffing, covering first,
for the out, Koenig scoring on the
play. English drew a base on balls,
but Cuyler's pop fly to Lazzeri ended
the rally.
The Cubs sent Bob Smith to the
mound to start the eighth stanza. He
struck out Ruffing. M o o r e lost
Combs' fly in the sun for a double.
Sewell scored Combs with a base hit
to left. Ruth and Gehrig flied out
to end the inning.
Stephenson opened the ninth with
his third hit of the game, but Dick-
ey took Moore's foul fly. Grimm
was then passed, but Hartnett flied
to Ruth, and Lazzeri threw Koenig
out at first to retire the Cubs.
SWIMMING MEET
Finals of the annual orientation
swimming meet wil be held at the
Intramural Pool today at 6 p. m.
If you write, we have it.
Correspondence Stationery,
Fountain Pens, Ink, etc.
Typewriters all makes.
Greeting Cards for evebody.
r0. D. ORR IL
4 S. State St., Ann Arbr.

Starting Team
Uncei Lain As
Chalges Made
Kipke S iifts Backs, Line
To S' rengthen Lineup
For c partan Clash
After Itering his lineup again,
Coach F xry Kipke sent his team;
outdoors vo a long offensive running
drill th ,, lasted for more than two
hours yu terday afternoon. Not sat-
isfied with the way the eleven per-
formed against the freshmen, Kipke
indicated that the team may still
be changed in order that the best
men will appear against State Sat-
urday.
The backfield was given a defen-
sive drill against a running attack'
of the freshman backs and showed
up poorly. The freshmen s l i c e d
through the Varsity backs at will
and on several occasions got away
for touchdowns. '
Hildebrand ,was shifted back into
left tackle as Ward returned to end.
Austin was the other tackle on the
first team. Regeczi returned to full-
back, temporarily at least, but ap-
peared unusually weak on making
open-field tackles. His defensive
ability has always been in doubt but
his showing yesterday led many to
believe that if Williamson can play
at end, Petoskey will be shifted to
fullback for part of the game at
least.
The return of Stanley Fay has
strengthened the team's running at-
tack. With Fay in the linely either
Jack Heston or Herman Everhardus
will play the other halfback position.
Although Everhardus has the edge
in passing ability, Heston is given a
slight edge in punting. Both are
open-field runners. The starting se-
lection is a toss-up at present.
.Captain Ivan Williamson has been
working out for two days and, seems
to be rounding into condition. Al-
though it is doubtful that he will
play as a regular, it is possible that
he will start the game anyway. Ward
is giving him a hard run for the
right end position, --
back In his best
shape it is unlikely
that he will replace
Ward for more than
a quarter at most.
Kowalik is a sure
starter at the left
g u a r d post. His
steady play in the
last few workouts
has gained him a
starting position.
With him will probably be Marcov-
sky. Marky has stepped out in this
week's practices, leading all of the
other candidates for the right guard.
Bernard will start at center with
Ford held in reserve.
b. a

State Machine
Sets Defense
Against Passes
Crowley Puts Spartans
Into Final Scrimmage
For Saturday's Game
LANSING, Sept. 28 - Michigan
State's football team held its last
hard scrimmage yesterday, after the
rain postponed the scrimmage sched-
uled for Tuesday. The rain had ne-
cessitated indoor practice, in which
Crowley put his men through a dum-
my defense scrimmage, concentrat-
ing on stopping Michigan's passes.
Before the scrimmage, each man
was given individual instruction in
defense against passes. While stress-
ing an aerial defense, Coach Frank
Leahy warned the men that Michi-
gan would have a powerful running
attack as well.
Crowley has worked out a defense
against passes that appears effective
enough on paper, but how it will
function in actual practice is still to
be determined, since Alma had vir-
tually no passing attack. The Spar-
tans' 93-0 victory over Alma is not
regarded as especially significant.
Yesterday's scrimmage wound up
the rough work in preparation for
Saturday's battle. Today the team
will engage in only a light work-
out. They will travel to Ypsilanti
Friday and have a signal drill in
the stadium in the afternoon.
Robert Terlaak's injured shoulder
is still causing considerable concern
in the Spartan camp. Crowley, fear-
ing that he may be out of the start-
ing line-up, at least, is priming Joe
Ferrari for the guard position. Fer-
rari acquitted himself well in the
Alma game. The only other injury
was a bruised left hand suffered by
Ralph Brunette last Saturday. The
hand is responding to treatment so
well that he is almost certain to be
in the starting line-up Saturday.
TRACK MANAGER TRYOUTS
Sophombres and second semes-
ter freshmen wishing to try out
for track manager apply at the
track locker room, Yost Field
House at 4 p. m. today.
Dick Norris,
Track Manager

Special efforts are being made by
the women's physical education de-
partment to afford opportunities to
all women on campus in order that
they may develop their recreational
interests to their fullest extent.
T h r o u g h interclass, intramural,
and W. A. A., every possible sport
is being offered. The interclass
schedule in hockey has begun, al-
though women still have time to en-
ter practices. Katherine Rentsch-
ler, W. A. A. hockey manager, is
working with Miss Laurie Campbell,
head of the major school, and a
staff of four coaches on this event.
Miss Hilda Burr, English hockey
coach and author of "Field Hockey
for Women," is again supervising the
coaching.
Definite organization is being made
in archery, tennis, and golf by the
W. A. A. sports managers and the
faculty adviser in charge of each

Sfiovs Imiproved Form

Stanley Fay, regular halfback on
last year's Varsity eleven, has been
slowly returning to last season's form
despite a leg injury. Fay is a flashy
runner and a power on the defense;
inddications point to the fact that
he has a good chance of starting in
the game 'against Michigan State
this Saturday.
Sports Are Open To All
Grad Women Students
Participation in all sports events
offered for University women is open
to graduate students as well as to
the other classes.
Field hockey, riding, tennis, golf,
swimming, and archery are included
in this list. Instruction in any of
these is available if desired for those
who wish to improve their skill. Wo-
men will be signed up by calling
4121, extension 721, and leaving their
names, addresses, and the desired ac-
tivity.
Beginners have been urged to elect
any sport they are interested in, as
experience is not essential.

Physical Education Department
Offers Varied Sports For Women

sport. Women interested in tour-
nament play in either of these sports
must sign up on the bulletin board
in Barbour Gymnasium or the Wo-
men's Athletic building.
Definite instruction in archery,
golf, and tennis will be given every
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday at 4 p. m. at Palmer Field.
All women may have instruction at
that time.
WOMEN'S HOCKEY PROGRAM
All practice games begin at 4:15
p. m. and last until 5:30.
Monday-Sophomores, Juniors,
Seniors
Tuesday-Freshmen, Sopho -
mores, Juniors
Wednesday-Freshmen, Sopho-
mores, Seniors
Thursday-Freshmen, Juniors,
Seniors

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