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October 26, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

Princeton To

Put Up Tough
Fight Saturday
Strong Line Is Expected
To Stop The Maize And
Blue's Running Attack
Saturday's intersectional battle will
see Michigan lined up against a rug-
ged team. It will be made up largely
of the same men who felt the sting
of defeat in 1931, but with Fritz
Crisler, Tad Wieman, Earl Martineau
and Campbell Dickson, all products
of the Western Conference, handling
the coaching reins, it has been ac-
complishing more than did the 1931
Princeton edition. Probably its out-
standing achievement was in holding
Cornell to a scoreless tie.
Draudt, James, Bales, Craig and
Purnell are names that have a fam-
iliar ring to Michigan followers who
saw their team in action against
Princeton a season ago, these boys
being the threat in the Tiger back-
field. A new name, Kadlic, sopho-
more quarterback, has been added,
however. Kadlic does the Tigers'
passing and so far has made a good
job of it. Purnell is the man who will
match punts with John Regeczi.
Boast Strong Line
In the line the Tigers have some-
thing to talk about. The forwards
are being coached by Tad Wieman,
who occupied the line coaching job
here for some time, and if the de-
fensive strength of the 1931 Prince-
ton forward wall plus such coaching
as Wieman may give it may be used
as a basis for judgment, the Wolver-
ine running attack is likely to hit
snags aplenty next Saturday. Hin-
man at center and Captain Billings
and Garrett, guards, are a rugged
trio in the center of the line, having
weight and ability. Fortune and
Johns at the tacklemake up in speed
what they lack in weight. Fairman
and Smithies are listed as the first
string ends, but Delaney, a sopho-
more, has been reaping most of the
glory of the Tiger's end play.

From the
PRESS BOX
By John Thomas
PURDUE continues to send this col-
umn reams of publicity that fea-
tures her strong bid for titular hon-
ors this season. But both North-1
western and Michigan have some-
thing to say about it. Purdue also
features her five year record, includ-
ing this season, which they tell us is
the best in the Mid-West. In 1929
the Boilermakers had an undisputed
championship, and a co-champion-
ship last year, but Michigan matches
this with two co-championships in
the last two years.
WITH Russell Damm, Michigan
tackle, and Fred Damit, Illinois
lineman, appearing in action last
week, the game took on a rather
curse-ory appearance, so the wits in-
formed us.
PETOSKEY has them buffaloed.
Everyone has implicit faith in
Ted and his ability to finish anything
he starts out to do. When he broke
loose on the 56-yard run against Illi-
nois, the scoreboard flashed the tra-
ditional six points for touchdown
while Ted had about 25 more yards
to cover before he reached the goal
line.
AND they tell one down at the Field.
House about the good doctor,
Frank Lynam, who gave a pep talk
about archery that lasted an hour
and 15 minutes to an inquiring per-
son, before he found out that the
fellow was from The Daily and only
wanted a story. Incidentally, he near-
ly landed the reporter for one of his
archery classes.
Hl G. SALSINGER, sports editor of
the Detroit News, selected four
outstanding players on Michigan's
eleven a short time ago and failed
to include Captain Ivan Williamson
in his list. Of course, Williamson
happens to be only the best end in
the conference, bar none. He never
is out of position nor makes a mis-
take in judgment. Although he is
neither as flashing nor as brilliant as
Petoskey, he lasts the full game for
he saves himself whenever his role
in the play is not particularly im-
portant..
* * *
BUD SHAVER, sports editor of the
Detroit Times, made a radio ad-
dress recently in which he talked
about Michigan's players. He named
the more outstanding performers but
failed to mention Bernard, Wolve-
rine star center. However in this case
it must have been mere oversight as
he has been one of Bernard's strong-
est boosters for All-American.

Cagers Play In
First Practice
Of New Season
Eighteen Men Answer First
Call; Six More Expected
After Football Season
Eighteen men answered Coach
Frank Cappon's first call for basket-
ball practice Monday and participat-
ed in the opening drill in fundamen-
tals. With the close of the football
season the roster will be augmented
by at least six members from the
gridiron squad.
Realizing that they face a real
problem in replacing Daniels, Weiss,
and Ricketts of last year's Varsity,
the cagers are getting down to bus-
iness with the football season but
half over. The first week's drill will
be confined to fundamentals, with
scrimmage coming later.
Five men from last year's Varsity
will form the nucleus of this year's
quintet. Capt. DeForest Eveland, Bob
Petrie, forwards; Ed Garner, center;
Ray Altenhof and Ivan Williamson,
guards, are the returning veterans.
Sophomores Good
In addition to these, several of last
year's secondary awards winners will
be fighting for positions on the team.
Ted Petoskey, Whitey Wistert, Bill
Renner, Fred Allen, John Boden, and
Rudy Barta make up this group.
The sophomore class will present
several candidates of Varsity caliber.
From the football squad, Russ Oliver,
John Regeczi, and Bill Borgman will
report. Those already practicing with
the squad include Don Black, Al
Plummer, Dana Seeley, Paul Bab-
cock, Don Nichols, and Jack Teitel-
baum.
The floor will probably be put down
in the field House about the third
week in November.iUntil then prac-
tice will continue in the Intramural
building. The Wolverines will meet
the Western State Teacher's College
quintet in the first game of the sea-
son here, Dec. 5.
Women's Golf Tourney
To Be Held This Week
First round matches in the annual
fall women's intramural golf tourney
are being played off this week. Thirty
entries have been received, and scores
of the matches will be posted on the
bulletin at the Women's Athletic
Building.
The tournament is played over
the first nine holes on the University
course. The first round matches must
be completed and scores turned in to
Marie; Hartwig at Barbour Gym by
Monday night. Barbara Newhardt
is the student manager, and ques-
tions are being referred to her or
Miss Hartwig.

i

I-M To Organize
All-Campus Toueh
Football Tourney
Earl Riskey, assistant intramural
director, announced yesterday that
an organization meeting for all non-
fraternity men interested in playing
touch football will be held Thursday
at 5 p. m. At that time teams will be
formed, rules discussed, and a prac-
tice session will be held.
Riskey already has six teams sign-
ed up, and 30 men, as yet unorgan-
ized, have also signified a desire to
play. The Darkhorses, who won the
tournament last year, as well as tak-
in the All-Year Independent tro-
phy, have again entered a team.
Touch football is played exactly
as the regulation game except that
nothing except shoulder blocking is
permitted, and a runner is down
when an opponent touches him with
both hands. Also, all players are eli-
gible to receive passes, not the backs
and ends only.

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reshmen Will Get
Next Trial Friday
I n Cross-Country
n order to determine the ten re-
pients of freshman cross-country
merals, Coach Kenneth Doherty
ll hold the fourth of the five sched-
ed time trial runs Friday afternoon.
The first five men to finish in last
turday's run, the first time trial
er the full distance, were Paul Gor-
an, Don Smith, "Red" Morgan,
ch Boebel and James Randall, in
at order. The race was a close one,
e first and fifth men finishing
thin forty seconds of each other.
The remarkable fact about this
ar's squad of freshman harriers is
at none of them have come up
om high schools with any great
cord of achievements, or with any
nsiderable experience. Coach Do-
rty has great expectations of Paul
orman, who has finished first in
ch one of the trial runs.
CALL COURT MANAGERS
There is still a chance to try out
rr the post of basketball manager,
cording to J. Noud Kely, present
anager. Those eligible are sopho-
ores or' second-semester freshmen.
nyone interested is asked to report
the Intramural building at 7:30
2y night this week.

3 pfor $ 125

Athletic Bo

Fred C. Fenske, of Bay City, a se
for in the school of education, I
been named this year's winner of t
$100 scholarship awarded annua
by the Board in Control of Athlet
to a senior athlete. Fenske, a s
sprinter and diver on the swimm
team and a letter man for the p
two years, won the scholarship
earning 26 hours of A grade and
hours of B last year. His total
honor points, 96, far exceeded tl
of any other man.
Four captains also are listed
ranking scholars. They are Ivan V
liamson, Toledo, Ohio, football lead
who made 13 hours of A, 14 of B a
3 of C or 70 points; Charles DeBal
Fruitport, Mich., captain-elect
track, 12 hours of A, 12 of B an(
of C for 66 points; Edwin F. Russ
captain of the 1932 track team
hours of A, 16 of B and 3 of C
62 points; and. DeForest Evela:
captain-elect in basketball, 4 hours
A, 19 of B, and 6 of C, for 56 poir
Edwin T. Turner, of Casper, W
star half miler and a member of
last Olympic team, received 12 ho
[of A, 16 of B and 3 of C, for 71 poir
Kenneth G. Manuel, first basen
on the baseball team, received
hours of A and 17 of B or 73 ho
uoints.

Fenske Winne
Of Award I

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