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March 03, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

[CHIGAN DAILY

was trying to right a great wrong when he voted
against his own man.
No satisfactory explanation has been advanced
for the strange moves of Gillespie, but it is evident
th,11he does possess a great deal of power. The
391 delegates, who constitute nearly one-fourth
j of the 1,400-odd delegates to the Republican con-
vention, were appointed directly by Gillespie andr
his aides. Such representation cannot fairly rep-'
resent the Republican voters of Wayne county.
Something is evidently wrong with a system
that allows nominations for public offices to re-'
pose in the hands of a few men. Citizens of Mich-
igan, Republican and Democratic alike, should
take steps to remedy the inefficiencies of such a
system.

The Theatre
* -o
HELP, MURDER, POLICE,
THREE TIMES THE HOUR
By GEORGE SPELVIN
Comedy Club came out of a prolonged coma last
night and presented Valentine Davies' "Three;
Times The Hour" before a highly satisfied audi-
ence at the Lydia Mendelssohn.
Our critical sentiments are so mixed in the
matter that we shall now lapse into a detailed
discussion without trying to sum up the offering
with our customary brilliance. What conclusions
there are to be drawn depend on the point of
view you are to take-whether, in general,' you
consider potentialities or results.
Here goes:

LOWEST CITY PRICES
THE ATHENS PRESS
Printers
Dial 2-1013 40 years of knowing how!
206 North Main Downtown

T ired? Thirsty? Hungry?
CALL 3494
Sodas -- Sundaes -- Shalkes
Cokes -_ G-Ales -Orangades
Tasty Sandwiches
Prompt Delivery

!'

WILL SWAP-
Date with blonde and
two Michigan Theatre
tickets for jig-saw puz-
zle Staeblers are giv-
ingaway at new st a-
t1in, State at Jeffer'son,

COLLEGE BEAUTY
SHOP
NewPrices
Shampoo & Fin gerwave 50c
Shampoo & Marcel . 75c
Manicure . . . . . . .25c

Calkins-Fetcher
Drug CO.

ii

L
r

-.M

i 1

iblished every morning except Monday during the
versity year and Summer Session by the Board in
trol of Student Publications.
mber of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
and the Big Ten News Service.
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otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
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orge Van Veck, Guy A. Whipple, Jr.
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CTANTS: John Bellawy, Gordon Boylai. Allen Cleve-
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ter Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward,.
abeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman. Doris
nmy, Billy- Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See* .

Editorial Comment
DEMOCRATIC ECONOMY?
In the fall of 1884, Grover Cleveland was
elected the twenty-second president of the United
States, the first Democrat to receive such honor
since the election of James Buchanan twenty-
eight years previously. At this time his followers,
flushed with victory, vowed that his inauguration
would "be a buster and beat the Republicans any-
how." They kept their word.
Last November Franklin D. Roosevelt was
elected the thirty-second president of the United
States, the first Democrat since Woodrow Wilson's
initial election fourteen years before. Although
the intervals, between Democratic presidencies
was but half as long, and although the great
masses of the proletariat are clahoring for econ-
omy, the nearer Saturday, March 4, 1933, ap-
proaches, the more it seems that history repeats
itself.
Republican representatives of the present "lame
duck" congress cry that the inauguration must be
ecoflomical, while their Democratic brethren de-
mand that it be magnificent. As a result of the
"balance of power" maintained by the two parties,
bills are passed granting $35,0 0 for engraved in-
vitations, grand stands at the capitol, and other
congressional expenses. Another bill grants $25,-
000 to the District of Columbia commissioners in
order that they may import policemen from Balti-
more, thirty-eight miles froni the capital city.
The government of the United States will not
bear all of the expense of the spectacular affair.
The Democratic inaugural committee is raising a
fund of $100,000 to make the event more impres-
sive, more colorful than that of the Republicans
who have gone before. This fund, which is being
liberally suscribed to by members of both parties
falls under a slightly different category than' the
thousands of dollars voted by congress, for the
lumber in the stands will be sold, and the money
realized from this sale will be used to repay those
who contributed the $100,000. Under a similar
plan four years ago, the amount subscribed was
all returned, and a surplus of almost half as much
was given to charity. Not so in the case of the
money spent by the government, for once it is
voted, it is gone, never to be seen again; it is in-
deed charity!
As citizens of this great nation we may well
wonder if this is right, if this is just, but after all,
what is fifty or a hundred thousand dollars to a
government that already carries a deficit of one
and one-half billions for less than two months
of this year?
Regardless of facts and figures, time passes on,
and presidents must be inaugurated. So be it,
"Hail to the Victor . ."

THE PLAY:
Mr. Davies' script is, or rather is capable of
being, an eXcellent Broadway thriller. What was
in evidence last night an unfinished product; a
couple of good ideas not completely worked out.
Faced by the necessity of making his parallel se-
quences coincide in time, Mr. Davies was forced
.to pad in some parts and cut hecticly in others.
The result was sometimes unfortunate-witness
the comic detective in Act I and the hazy treat-
ment in Act III (due to too much haste) of sev-
eral important plot details.
We believe that Mr. Davies should forget his
scruples in the matter of getting the timing pre-
cise---the audience was too interested to clock the
action--and take the few moments necessary to
clarify his situations. And tighter plotting might
eliminate a few unneeded characters.
Though who are we, for that matter, to be tell-
ing Mr. Davies how to write plays? It is obvious
that k e did a good job on a plot structure that is,
too upnusual to fit any of the rules. He secured
a building up of excitement in spite of the neces-
sity for starting proceedings all over again with
each act. Our only complaint is that he was aC
little too clever; his plot was too intricate to be I
clear.
THE CAST:
Ah, now we're down to cases.
The rating goes something like this:
No. 1--James Raymond. Why can't someone
else around here learn to act like a grown man?
No. 2-Nelson Shaw, handling the best and
most difficult part in the play with what we might
term professional dexterity.
No. 3-Miles Herbert. Very amusing in a bit de-
spite our traditional bad make-up for character
parts.
No. 4-Hobart Skidmore. Our favorite unsuc-
cessful playwright showing that he can act, too.
Swell.
No. 5-Ann Verner. The sympathetic under-
standing Miss Verner evinces in her drunk scene
is a little short of miraculous. Very good.
Nos. 6, 7-Barbara Van Der Vort, David Zim-
merman.
Nos. 8 through 23-Your Uncle George has de-
cided to maintain a discreet silence.
About the story-we forgot to mention it is a
murder mystery. And a clever one, too.
STARCS

Whose Birthday
Is Today?

Arch . . . . . .

. 25c

Oil Permanents . . . $2.00
302 South State
Phone 2-2813 Open Evenings

I1

II

1

There are three hundred and sixty-
five days in the year and each one is
some one's birthday. Do you re-
member? Flowers are the logical
gift.
The University Flowers Shop,
Inc., is at your service, they are as

DEPOSITORS.
No 5% rule on free jig-
saw puzzles at the new
Staebler station, State
at Jeff erson. You draw
1 %o o tonce in fun,
I service and satisfaction.

near as your phone.

Flowers for

any purpose or occasion.

" They Grow Their Own "
Headquarters for Fresh Gardenias

F

._ .
. .,....,_,...A ., ,

I:

Member of the FLORIST'S
TELEGRAPH ASSOCIATION

__ ._._
C
1 i

dance

tonigh'9t

at

F

ZTDAY, MARCH 3,1933
n ion flai'c uts

) !

the hug

The Union is still charging 45 cents for hair-
its.' Every other shop in towi is charging 35
nts. The Union, a student club, is a non-
ofit organization and exists solely for the
udents. Yet the Union will not meet the town
te.

9:00- -12:*00

THS EUNIVERSITY FLOWER SHOP, INC.
THE Phone 9055 606 East Liberty St.
for FRIDAY and SATURDAY
35c 100 5cKolnos$1.00
Moes Bayer ToQ oh" Probak
EAspirin Paste Blades
19c 74c 39c 69c
$1.25 Parke Davis Haliver Oil. . . . . $1.09
$2.75 Parke Davis Haliver Oil. . . . . $2.49
$1.00 Parke Davis Haliver Oil .. . . . 89c
$3.50 Milano and Kaywoodie Pipes. . $2.95
35c Williams Shaving Cream . . . . . . 27c
Virginia $1.50 60c 25c
Dare Antiseptic Monogram Kleenex
Tonic Mouthwash Stationery
$1.09 59c 39c 19C
SWIFT DRUG STORE,
340 South State Street
Phone 3534 We Deliver

.4

Fire
Irfini

come to fingerle's
fori real evening

'it

:iw 4

T HE STATE REPUBLICAN conven-
tion held in Grand Rapids last
Tuesday would furnish a clever plot for a short
story writer. It would not be a new plot-for
such political chicanery has been going on as long
as politics has existed-but it would be an in-
teresting one.
The leading role would undoubtedly go to Johnj
Gillespie, Detroit politician whose influence has'
grown to state-wide proportions. His characteri-
zation is an unusual one for while the average
'power behind the throne" is content to stay there
and pull the strings, Gillespie comes out before
the public. This he did at the convention, where,
in a few well turned statements, he declared that
he was authorized by James O. Murfin, of De-
troit, a regent of the University to withdraw Mur-
fin's name from the nomination lists for re-elec-
tion. Murfin, who was not present at the conven-
tion, later delcared that he had had no intention
of withdrawing.
On the ballot for the first of the two nomina-
tions for the office, Gillespie's hand-picked dele-
gation swung the bid to Donald E. Johnson, 30-
year-old McKeighan man, to defeat William L.
Clements, present incumbent, who has served
more than 25 years as Regent and donated the
$2,000,000 Clements Library to the University.
Clements' name was again proposed in the sec-
ond ballot against that of Murfin. Although Gil-
lespie's request that Murfin's name be dropped
was refused, the Wayne delegation voted for
Clements. This of course eliminated Murfin from
the nomination. Why Gillespie should seek the
defeat of a man from his own district remains a
mystery. Unquestionably, both Clements and
Murfin should have been retained.
Another highlight of the convention came when
Gillespie, allied with the McKank group, dropped
the fight to nominate Manley Osgood, Ann Arbor
contractor, over Grover C. Dillman, the present
incumbent, for state highway commissioner. Pre-
vious to the convention, Osgood seemed assured
of the support of Gillespie's men together with
a bloc of western votes under McKay, who has
been fighting Dillman for years. However, only
four out of Washtenaw's delegation of 28 were
pledged to vote for Osgood, and this lack of sup-
port from his home county influenced many who
were on the fence. At 2 o'clock of the morning
of the convention, Osgood gave up hope and with-
drew his name, As the convention opened it was
1eported that Gillespie evidently intended to put
Osgood's name before the convention even though
it was apparent that he would lose. These plans
were abandoned at the last minute but, had they
gone through, the overwhelming defeat would
probably have buried any of Osgood's political
hopes for years to come.

-Purdue Exponent,I

&

ST'RIPE S

GREY HEADS HOLD THE REINS
An interesting sidelight of the recent announce-
ment of the Roosevelt Cabinet is the fact that
a majority of the appointments went to grey
heads. James A. Farley and Henry A. Wallace are
the youngest members of the group, each of them
being in his forties. But William Woodin, new
Secretary of the Treasury, is 64, fifteen years
older than Secretary Mills. The average age of the
Roosevelt Cabinet is 58.9, a year and a half above
the average of the Hoover group. A short time
ago, Col. E. M. House said, "My only advice to Mr.
Roosevelt is to 'rely on young 'men And stay away
from us old dodo birds." Evidently the President-
elect has other plans.
The truth of the matter is that it would be im-
possible for Mr. Roosevelt to rely completely
upon younger men even if he tried. For, although
many of the battle-scarred veterans of Congress
are now lame ducks, the average age of senators,
and representatives is well up in the fifties. Con-
gressman Rainey of Illinois, the Democratic ma-
jority leader in the House, is 72. Justice Brandeis
is the oldest member of the Supreme Court, where
the average is 68. The oldosters are clearly in
control in Washington, and it appears that the
new Administration entirely appr'oves of this state
of affairs.
Mellowed philosophers belonging to the Col.
House school, who believe. that "the liope of this
country lies in its placing its trust in youth, will
probably see cause for despair in 'the existing
balance of control in the national government.
But if Bernard Shaw, who believes that the prob-e
lems of the world exist only because men can-
not live long enough to reach the maturity neces-
sary for solving them, were to comment upon it,
he would undoubtedly approve, as does Mr. Roose-
velt according to all appearances. The disagree-
ment is that of decrepit old age with vigorous
maturity. It is perfectly clear whose case has the
greater merit.
-The Dartmouth.
ULTRA MODERN OR
ULTRA FOOLISH?
If a visitor were to be suddenly transported
from Mars and set down on an American campus,
one of the first impressions would be the domin-
ion of profanity in the college vocabulary, nearly
to the conclusion of more cultured language.
So common has this habit of emphasizing and
making vivid the speech by these swear words
become that college students are not even con-
scious of what they are saying. The words just
come rolling out without any effort or thought.
This trait is acquired by the freshman student

By Karl Sei fertm-
ODE TA HELL
Ta hell with all conventions,
Ta hell with false pretentions,
Ta hell with good intentions-
I'm blase.

I'; I

II

i

GRACIE-

Ta hell with moderation,
Ta hell with toleration,
Ta hell with prohibition-
We want beer!
Ta hell with realism,
Ta hell with anarchism,
Ta hell with socialism-
0. K., America!
Ta hell with instigators,d
Ta hell with profligators,
Ta hell with mashed potaters-
Buy American!

I've given up the saxo-
phone. Please come
back and bring jig-saw
puzzle from the new
Staebler s t a t i o n at
State and Jefferson.

- - _.__ __.____ __ _. ____. r

RUSSIAN
pN NI.SrT

Let Al

Ta hell with all depressions,
Ta hell with first impressions,
Ta hell with League of Nations-
Spring is here again!
-Smokey.
Somehow it's gotten around that the title of
the booklet that will shortly go to press at Vassar
on advice to girls on house party dates will be
titled, "What Every Girl Should No."
MANY COLLEGE
MEN IN PRISON
-Headline
Oh, no, it just seems that way now-after
you get out you'll realize what education
really means.
TODAY7S TITLE ROLE
Professor of Zoology, Research Associate in
the Museum of Zoology, Director of the Biolog-
ical Station, and Custodian of the Bogardus
Tract.
-Carried around by George, R. LaRue, Ph.D.
Will "The Turk" communicate with Jennie P.
Need assistance. Same address.-Personal in De-
troit paper.
Turk or no Turk, if he can help you, Jennie,
send him around to see us.
A writer declares that an elk hound named
Weigie and a police dog called Pat are President
Hoover's only pets. How about that little matter
known as prosperity?

,
F
I
31
3i
{

i

the Ad-Taker

CHORAL UNION
CONCERI'

take care

of

I

I

HILL

Your
SWAPS

AUDITORIUM

4t

CALL'
2-1214

Tickets: $ 1.00, $150
$2.00, $2.50

Monday, March 6

8:15

STATIONERY SPECIAL

One Pound (60 Sheets) OLD DARTFORD PAPER
Wit- 50 Envelopes - All of Good Quality and Attractively boxed,

"nip, .

he

I

I I trfw ,TT n-va r- T'. -rr' e" lTV rT

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