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May 28, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wistert Gives 5
Hits To Shut Out
Chicago,_4 To 0
Diffley Stars With Two
Runs And Three Hits In
Three Trips To Plate
Petoskey Gets Triple
Straske, Visiting Pitcher,
Gives Michigan 10 Hits;
Diffley Also Stars
By ART CARSTENS
Whitey Wistert allowed only five
scattered hits as he shut out the
Chicago Maroons, 4 to 0, in a game
played at Ferry Field yesterday aft-
ernoon. Although the blond giant
walked four of Coach Pat Page's
proteges he off-set this by striking
out nine. Only one of the Maroon
hits was good for piore than one
base, Levin cracking the first ball
pitched in the first inning for three
bases.
Mike Diffiley, Wolverine catcher
and captain, co-starred with Wistert,
getting three hits in three official
trips to the plate, scoring two runs
and batting in another. Besides this
he cut off two Maroons who were
attempting to score from third, and
was credited with three assists. Dif-
fley was making his last home ap-
pearance and concluded in a blaze
of glory.
yDiffley, Levin Mix
The Wolverine backstop showed
his combative spirit in the first in-
ning when Dave Levin, attempting
to score on a double steal, arrived at
home to find the ball and Diffley
awaiting him. Levin jumped high
into the air in trying to reach the
plate, only to land squarely on dif-
fley's back, from whence he was
catapulted over the base, Diffley
pouncing on him and tagging him
out.
The Wolves collected a total of 10
hits, .batting safely in all except two
innings, but could get runners all the
way around in only two stanzas, the
second and seventh.
Petoskey, first up in the second,
drove the first pitch over the left
fielder's head for three bases. Diffley
got the first of his hits, a single be-
tween second and short, bringing in
Petoskey with the first run of the
game.
Pitcher Hits Manuel
Manuel strolled to first after
Pitcher Steve Straske had dusted off
his shirt front, forcing Diffley to
second. Ware laid down a perfect
bunt and beat the throw to first to
fill the bases.
Oliver lifted a high, long fly to
center to score Diffley. With Man-
uel and Ware still on bases, Wistert
fanned and Artz popped a high in-
field fly to retire the side.
Diffley started things in the sev-
enth when he dragged a two-bagger
down the left field foul line, then
proceeded to score from second on
Manuel's single. Manuel went to sec-
ond on the throw to the plate which
attempted to cut Diffley off.
Manuel stayed on first while Ware
flied out to right, but cantered to
third when Straske balked. Oliver
then golfed a single down the third
base line to score Manuel with the
final run of the game.
Dave Levin furnished most of the
fireworks from a Chicago stand-
point. Besides his three bagger and
fantastic slide in the opening stanza,
he got two more hits and got on
once on an error. His base running
was daring-to say the least. Three
times he attempted to steal bases

only to be run down and tagged.
Levin Draws Boos
A colorful player, he aroused the
ire of the crowd in his tangle with
Diffley, so that he drew a generous
round of boos whenever he appeared
at the plate.
The weather was about the worst
under which baseball could be played,
and amply accounted for the total
of three boots made by both teams,
the Wolves garnering two of them.

I-M Building Will Be
Open Memorial Day
Early Riskey, assistant director
of Intramural Sports yesterday
announced the following building
regulations for Memorial Day:
Building hours 8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Showers 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Pool hours 10 A.M. to 12 Noon
and 3 P.M. to 6 P.M.
Daring Drivers To
Compete In Annual
Indianapolis Event
INDIANAPOLIS, May 27.-(;)-
Valiants of speed, heavy-footed and
quick-minded, meet in the famous
arena of auto racing Tuesday, May
30, when the fast field gets away
in the twenty-first running of the
annual 500-mile race.
Motors this year are tuned to un-
heard of speed for two-men cars.
The first six starters qualified in bet-
ter time than the fastest car of 1932.
The dozen cars on the four front
rows showed more speed than did
the third qualifier last year. The
'field as a whole is the most capable
one that has ever faced the starter's
flag on the Hoosier bricks.
Daring youth and sagacious vet-
erans will be riding the front rows
with almost equal speed and power
and with the decision of pace an
important factor.
Youth may pin all on fleetness
and win a spectacular, record-break-
ing victory, but experience, which
reminds the veteran that the race is
long and gruelling, may cause some
of the money drivers to hold back
for a final sprint.
.MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

U.S.C. Captures
National Track
Championship
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., May 27.-(.P)
-Although capturing only one first
place in the Intercollegiate A.A.A.A.
track and field meet here today,i
Southern California romped off with
the team title for the fourth year in
succession by piling up 45 points.
The Trojans scored in 10 of the
15 events and gained the much-de-
sired triumph over their arch-rivals
from the west coast, Stanford, which
finished second in team standings
with 42 points.
Bill Bonthron, Princeton's mar-1
velous runner, garnered the individ-
ual honors for the day by being the
only double victor. The Eastern star
sprinted to a 3:54 victory in the
1500-meters, and then came back a
short while later to win the 800-
meters final in 1:53.5, leaving flound-
ering in his wake,
Two records were smashed in the
shot put and the high jump. John
Lyman of Stanford pushed the shot
for 52 feet 8%12 inches, surpassing
the present world's record but just
falling short of the American record
made by Leon Sexton last year.
George Spitz of N.Y.U. cleared 6 feet
6 1-8 inches to set a new I.C.A.A.A.A.

1111

-By AL NEWMAN

Sang Froid
These Women
* * *
WE HAVE finally found the height lap as
of sang froid. To those Indian- stop.
apolis racers goes the palm for sheer
cold-blooded nerve, at least to those HELI
who qualified early in the week. Th
From recent dispatches we read that Easter
they are taking it easy and playing pionsh
golf while their mechanics tear down week.
the cars preliminary to the start of Park,
the race. at Mon
Wero we going to travel 500 miles temis
next Tuesday at an average pace of Femin
over 100 miles an hour, we strongly other
suspect that we would pass a jittery Somers
week-end. And if our car were being others
torn down and put together again, But t
we would look to see that the job madei
was done thoroughly, and no cotter miss
pins left out of the wheel assemblies, wasn't
please. create
Tearing down the cars and re- { wink).
building them is an accepted ritual val bt
down at the Indianapolis race. After contes
a car qualifies, it is weighed and said t
tested as to specifications for the mirroi
race. Then the chief mechanic, a right.
cranky soul, directs the work of tak-priit
ing apart, adjusting, and putting to- Ipoie
gether. Usually, he does the engine her pm
himself, seeing that the bearings are
just tight enough, and that the qual-
ifying pace hasn't brought out any
flaws. GR'
Then the bus is put together and (P)-S
tested again to see if everything is Walsh,
satisfactory and how far it will go day s
on the standard 15-gallon tank of eight-
gas. Refueling is a waste of precious world'
time, especially if the pits are crowd- Mejzli
ed. Usually there is the loss of one Paris

I

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7
1
1 ',
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standard.

BOX SCORE

l

II

Chicago
Levin, cf......
Ratner, if .....
Decker, ss .....
Beeks, lb ......
Lewis, c .......
Comerford, 3b..
Berkson, rf ....
Munn, 2b......
Straske, p.....

AB
.4
.4
.4
.2
.2
.4
.4
.3
.3

New York........
Washington .... .. .
Chicago..........
Philadelphia ... ,....
Cleveland........
Detroit ...........
St. Louis.........
Boston..........

W.
21
22
19
19
20
15
14
12

L.
12
16
15
15
17
21
24
22

Pet.
.656
.579
.558
.558
.540
.416
.368
.353

Totals .....
Michigan
Artz, rf.
Waterbor, 2b
Braendle, If .
Petoskey, cf ..
Diffley, c .... .
Manuel, ss ...
Ware, lb ....
Oliver, 3b
Wistert, p
Totals ....
Chicago
Michigan ....

......30
AB
4
.... 4
..4
3
2
3
2
. . ... 3
... 29

RI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
4

H
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
H
1
2
0
1
3
1
1
1
0
10

L
1
3
6
3
0
1
2
1
24
O
0
1
0
0
11
3
12
0
0
27

A
1
0
1
0
2
2
0
2
4
12
A
0
4
0
0
3
4
0
1
3
15

E
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
E
0
1
0
0
0
Q
0
0
0
2

Iii

for

Philadelphia,

5-7-1, Freitas,

Grove and Cochrane; Detroit, 2-5
-0, Marberry, Herring, and Hay-
worth.
Cleveland, 6-7-0, Ferrell and
Spencer; Boston, 0-9-1, Brown,
Welch and Ferrell.
New York, 15-14-2, Brennan,
Moore, Brown and Dickey; Chicago,
11-19-0, Lyons, Miller, Durham
and Grube. ,
St. Louis-Washington, postponed,
wet grounds.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

.000 000 000-0
.020 000 20*-4

W.
Pittsburgh ..........22
New York..........20
St. Louis ...........21
Cincinnati .......... 19
Chicago...........18
Boston .............17
Brooklyn ...........14
Philadelphia ........ 13
Cincinnati, 4-7-2,

L.
12
'4
16
18
19
21
19
25
Kolp

Pet.j
.647
.588
.567
.513
.486
.447
.424
.342
and

Two-base hit-Diffley. Three-base
hits-Levin, Petoskey. Sacrifice hits
-Oliver, Manuel. Double play --
Etraske to Comerford to Decker to
Beeks. Struck out-By Wistert, 9;
by Straske, 2. Bases on balls-Off
Wistert, 4; off Straske, 1. Left on
bases-Michigan, 5; Chicago, 7. Hit
by pitcher-By Straske (Manuel).
Balk-Straske. Umpires-Snyder and
Vick. Time of game-1:55.
U-M Frosh Figure
In Boy's Tourney
Howard P. Kahn, '36, drew a bye
and reached the quarter-finals of the
second annual Michigan Boy's Open
Tennis Tournament held yesterday
at Cranbrook in Bloomfield Hills.
Kahn, who had been seeded No. 1 po-
sition for the Junior singles, easily
defeated Bruce Beadette in two sets,
6-0 and 6-1.
Theodore T. Thornwood, also a
freshman at the University, drew a
bye too and reached the quarter-
finals of the singles tournament by
beating James Talman, 6-4 and 7-5.

Hemsley; Brooklyn, 3-9-1, Benge
and Outen, Manion.
St. Louis, 10-18-0, Hallahan and
Wilson; Philadelphia, 1-8-0, Col-
lins and Davis.
Boston-Chicago, postponed.
New York-Pittsburgh, postponed,
rain.

Nickels Arcade

SDN ,
0 - SERVICE

III

I

.oso..

W °®°5

Swimming Time Again!
Are You Fully Equipped for Your Memorial Day Holiday?
F We have the New
'KREPE-TEX' RUBBER SWIM SUITS
GANTNER WIKIES and HI-BOYS

in

II

-and Everything in Beach Equipment

-,-
.:~7

BEACH SANDALS
EAR PLUGS

RUBBER CAPS
WATER TOYS

Pnrirp _ mnp

MID , *% UI-wt

rI

: 0

I

I -- -- -- -- - -I I

1111

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