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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-02-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AN DAILY

A

every morning except Monday during the
dear and Summer Session by the Board in
tuadent Publications.
f the Western Conference Editorial Associa-1
ie Big Ten Newis Service.
IBER OF THE 4SSOCIATED PRESS
atedi Press is exclusively entitled to the use
ation of all news dispatches credited to it or
e credited in this paper and the local news
erein. All rights of republication of special
,re reserved.
the Post Office at Ann Arbor, 'Michigan, as;
matter. Special rate of postage granted by
ant Postmaster-General.
on during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail;
g regular school year by carrier. $4.00:' by

d-A =A

4.50.
ces : Student Publications B'

ilding, Maynard Street,
ations Representatives,
etNew York City; m80
orth Michigan Avenue,

at,, iu3bSV

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telehone 425
sCANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILRETHI
ITY, EDITORt........................ KARL SEFFRT
PORTSEDITOR......JOHN W.THOMAS
WOIMEN'S EDITOR........MARGARET O'BRENE
ASISTANT WOMEN'S EDTOR..A....IRAM CARVER
1RIGH EDITORS: Thomas Cnnellan, "Norman P. K~t
John W. ritchard JoseA Renihan C. art Shaaf.
Brackley Shaw, Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber.
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.]
REPORTERS: Hyman J. Aronstam, Charles Baird, A'
lls Ball, Charle arndt, James L. Bauchat, CharlesI
" rownson, -Arthur, W. Carstens, Ralph C. Coue r,
William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C Healey,1
Robert B. Hewett, George m. HIolmes, Edwin W. Richard-
onGerge' Van VWek, Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W. Stod-
dard White
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beek, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen'
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
Jeanette Duff, CarolJ. Hanan,,Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Muphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER....... ....YON . VEDDEE
CREDIT MANAGER...............HARRY BEGLE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;1
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ibe, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E Bursley; Publications. Robert E.
Fann.
ASSISTANTS Jack Bellamy, Gordon BoylanAllen Cleve-
land, -Charles Efert,: Jack Efroymson Fre flertrik,
Joseph Hums, Allen Knuusi, hussell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Eliabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beula Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billy Griiths, Virginia Hartz Catherine Mc-
fry, Helen Olson, Helen Shmude, May Seefried,
Kthryn Stork.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1933
Union Haircuts
The Union is still charging 45 cents for hair-
cuts. Every other shop in town is charging 35
cents. The Union, a student club, is a non-
profit organization and exists solely for the
students. Yet the Union will not meet the town
rate.
Michigan's Unofficial
Beauty Queen...
F OR THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS
American undergraduate bodies
have by definite efforts at conservatism been rid-
ding themselves of the unbalanced, rah, rah repu-
tation tacked to them by magazines and comic
strips during the so-called collegiate era. Unusual
dress and distinct efforts to attract attention have
successfully been regaled to the years gone by,
Regardless of "hell weeks" and industrial athletics
it must be admitted that students have ceased to
be A-1 cartoon copy.
However, one large middle-western eucational
institution remains a stronghold of "coflegiatism"
and all that it connotes. Rah, rah is still an ad-
jective applicable to its students and mock elec-
tions are important functions.
Accordingly an organization of its undergrad-
uates still sponsors a Western Conference beauty
contest. That it is not in favor at Michigan was
definitely shown when two student publications
refused to co-operate in selecting a candidate for
the "honor."
In spite of this, one Michigan student, fired
by fraternal ties, undertook to name the most
pulchritudinous among his undergraduate asso-
ciates and calling her the representative of Mich-
igan. A leading advisor of women here convinced
his original selection that it was not quite the
thing for her to do to accept free transportation
to Chicago as an entrant in a femininity tourna-
ment.
Nevertheless, a Wolverine beauty, more confi-
dent in her own judgment, did consent to at-
tending the charity ball, looking winningly at
Ben Bernie, and having an Illini Venus walk away
with the roses.
Incidents like that are oxygen to the dying coals
of "collegiatism." Inasmuch as the student body
was not actively in sympathy with the contest
and because it represents that which intelligent
undergraduates discount, we hope that at least
our unofficial entry had a good time in Chicago.
The Repeal Virility
InWashington .. .
W HEN Speaker Garner's repeal es-
lution failed to pass the House in

December, most observers felt that nothing fur-
ther would be done by the present Congress con-
cerning the Eighteenth Amendment.
It was held then that this was unfortunate for
the country, since it meant that the new govern-

(assuming a special session will be called) will
waste little valuable time on prohibition.
It would be interesting to be able to look be-
hind the scenes, and see what caused Monday's
rapid action. From some source life and virility
were suddenly breathed into a body that appeared
almost decadent. We hope that the passage of the
resolution indicates a re-birth of Congressional
stability.
And if the whip was President-Elect Roosevelt,
as is possible, we may expect the kind of leader-
ship and unity in the next regime that the nation
so sorely needs.
The Theatre
PROF. WILLEY WRITES
ON "IIEDDA GABLER"
(Professor Norman L. Willey of the Ger-
man department, instructor in Scandinavian,
who gives the course in Henrik Ibsen's plays,
writes on the play which opens at Play Pro-
duction's Laboratory Theatre tonight,)
I am delighted to learn that the Laboratory
Theatre is about to present Hedda Gabler and I
sincerely hope that your success will be commen-
surate with the painstaking effort involved in the
production of so difficult a play.
I believe that no one of Ibsen's social dramas
places greater demands on the actors than Hedda
Gabler, for here we have something as far re-
moved from the stock characters and mechanical
intrigue of the classic Romance drama as a mod-
ern photograph is from the rock-scratched
sketches of the cave men. Almost any amateur
actor may play successfully the role of a clown,
but it requires careful study and real histrionic
ability to present convincingly the complex Fru
Iledda Tesman f. Gabler, the unctuous reptilian
Assessor Brack or that splendid example of the
research professor, Jorgen Tesman, Ph. D. Even
that conceited Vass, Lovborg, with his hollow
phrases and bibulous weakness can be spoiled for
the discriminating audience if he appears as a
rosy-cheeed youngster, who acts like mama's
wonder child declaiming for the amusement of
some bored ladies at a tea party.
Hedda Gabler is a play that has an especial
appeal to us as a university audience, for we are
more famiilar with the psychology involved there-
in than is the general public. Every one of us
knows the. sophisticated and blasee Hedda,
although she may go by the name of Smythe or
Stuyvesant .or Lowell, a poor creature for whom
we unfortunately cannot feel an academic sym-
pathy, for all her boredom is due to her adhesion
to the code of a snobbish clique.
*The Hedda of the play has spent her six-month
honeymoon trip in Germany and Austria with the
opportunity to observe the intense intellectual
life of forty years ago. She no doubt visited the
principal museums, heard the best operas and saw
the greatest monuments of Central European civi-
lization, yet she was bored all the time because
she did not meet a single person who belonged to
"her set." Indeed she took so little interest in
what she saw that she could not tell what any of
her photographs represented unless her husband
had written the names underneath. Even the
quaint village in the Alps she remembers only as
the place where they met the tourists.
How many American travellers do we know
whose trips to Europe have given them no further
topics of conversation than the poor quality of
European coffee or tobacco and the remembrance
of meeting John Smith of Kalamazoo in Rome or
Paris?
Hedda belonged to the offiial class in Kristiania,
a provincial town that back in 1890 was only a
little larger than our present Grand Rapids. As
long as her father, the general, was alive, she was
a large toad in a small puddle, soldiers saluted
her, young officers were eager to dance with her,
and she shone in the exclusive society of the Swed-
ish-Norwegan government clerks. But with her
father's death she was left in poverty, a woman
ngarly thirty whose beauty had lost its freshness
from the strain of her unnatural life, a person
with no accomplishments, no interests, and an
abject slave to Madam Grundy. To be sure she did
the most practical thing she could to bolster her
fallen social stock by marrying the most promis-
ing of her suitors, Tesman, but he proved to be
only another misfortune for her, his sole interest
in life was his specialty, the domestic activities of

the Middle Ages, his relatives annoyed her, and
his chances of rising further than a humble pro-
fessorate were negligible. Then too Hedda is im-
mediately faced by the distasteful prospect of
motherhood and in addition through her malicious
but stupid intriguing she finds herself reduced to
a plaything in the hands of the old roue, Brack,'
and sees a hated rival gaining an ascendancy over
her dolt of a husband. Her. suicide is logical
enough.
Probably such an unfortunate creature is en-
titled to sympathy, but to make her a normal
member of society it would be necessary to re-
vamp her entire character. She is thoroughly sel-
ish, unscrupulous, vindictive, cowardly and heart-
less.
"Almost-a-Professor" Tesman, too, we are un-
fortunately familiar with; he is the type who can
count the number of punctuation marks in a
manuscript, copy in longhand a rare first edition,
a:ake up a general bibliography and perhaps do
tome other little things as well as the average
tenographer, but in all his life he has never ex-
)erienced an original thought. In one thing, how-
3ver, he differs strikingly from type; he does not
once attempt a pompous phrase, his language
throughout is simple and contains none of the
learned lumber of which the usual pedant is so
fond. Even his mannerism, "Tank det!" is an
expression anyone might use and does not at all
have the effect that a broad "Fawncy that!" pro-
duces on us Middle-Westerners.
Incidentally the fact that Tesman secures the
degree of Doctor during his, six-month leave of
absence, although his time is occupied with
honeymooning, travelling and transcription, does
not at all indicate great ability but rather shows
how cheaply an European degree is sometimes
obtained.

tion and condemnation the logical by-product of
our social organization and showing us their
necessary reaction under conditions varying
slightly from normal. Eilert Lovborg recidivates at
the taste of a little alcohol, Jorgen Tesman loses
his veneer of morality when the burning of an-
other man's manuscript removes an obstacle from
his path, the cowardly Hedda avoids facing the
facts of the situation by the use of General Ga-
bler's remaining pistol, even the suave Brack
overreaches himself and misses the snug triangu-
lar arrangement he was congratulating himself
upon. Although we feel coldly indifferent to the
fate of the characters, the play is nevertheless
one of the most powerful that Ibsen has written
and its stage success is always without question.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
gardedas confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
WILL THE DAILY
PUBLISH POEMS?
To The Editor:
Recently I have heard several comments on the
fact that there ,,hould be some means of printing
the best student literary productions. It has been
found in the past that a strictly literary maga-
zine has no sale, but it seems possible that the
Daily might print short poems, not necessarily
highbrow, but still not infringing on the Gar-
goyle's material. Students feel that poems or short
articles would be more appreciated than some of
the less interesting Associated Press features
which now servc to fill up space. Could a start be
made in this direction by publishing the winning
poem of the Hopwood contest? I think it would
be appreciated among the students. -Student
IS THE DAILY SERIOUS?
To The Editor:
May I inquire whether the Daily is sufficiently
serious in its recent criticisms of professorial
practices to invite and encourage a considerable
discussion of such matters in its columns, par-
ticipated in primarily by students, and particular-
ly by students the quality of whose academic per-
formance may lend weight to their opinions? Is
there, for example, any advantage, as I have as-
sumed in two of my courses given editorial men-
tion-courses in which I have required the pur-
chase of 700- and 900-page systematic treatises
every paragraph of which is to be assigned defi-
nitely and mastered-in having a textboook in the
direct personal possession of the student? Does
any merit attach to the lecture method-of which
with some misgivings I am also guilty; or might
such flexible interpretations of material, such
placings of emphasis, as are sought in lectures be
well replaced by the students imaginative reading
of mimeographed materials? The aspects of these
questions treated editorially, as well as other
aspects of them, have of course been weighed in
the professorial mind. It would be enlightening to
the, teacher, nevertheless, and might promote
greater understanding on the student's part of
the regimen to which he is subjected, if a frank
discussion sho ld develop, consisting of the re-
sponsible judgments of sincere students.
Shorey Peterson.

TYPEWRITERS - PORTABLI
New, Seaond-Han Rebailt,
X8t2-Corona, Noiseless,
Underwood, Boyal, Remingtoni
14V-7- tate St., Ann Arbor.
HENRY KEAN
e reha c a'Tailor
2 Southampton Row
London, England
Our representative, Mr. W. J.
Enright will be at the Union on
I February 23rd, with samples of
flnest English and Scotch wool-
en suitings and overcoatings.

LOWEST CITY PRICES
THE ATHENS PRESS
Printers
Dial 2-1013 40 years of knowing how!
206 North Main Downtown

E.
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TELEPHONE CO.

Ii

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF LOW
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WHEN CONVENIENT...

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MICHIGAN DAILY

CLASSI FI ED
DIRECTORY

Big Rapids . . ..... .90
Birmingham ......$ .30
Chicago...........1.05
Escanaba.. .....1.55
Grand Rapids .......80
Holland.........85
Houghton.........2.00
Iron Mountain .... 1.70
Indianapolis .......1.05
Jackson.............30
Lansing. ........ ....45
New York .........2.1-5

Evening
7:00 P.M.-
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Night
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Here there is advertised
everything from Rooms,
Typing, Tutoring, etc.,
to "Wanted--A J-Hop
Date." Get in the habit'
of reading the Classifieds
because they are interest-
ing and they offer many
bargainst

Petoskey
Saginaw.

1.30
.60

(When the charge for a
a Federal tax

call is 50c or more,
applies)

STiARS

a
' ' r.

& STRIP ES

* i r
Zy h

a-

--By Karl Seiffert
A VERSE FOR GEORGE'S BIRTHDAY
George Washin'gton was good and great-
We do his memory homage;
He knew the most about the state
Of all preceding Bromage.
He knocked the British off their feet
Without a bit of bother.
It's fun, he said, and hard to beat-
One George against another.
His memory is on a throne
Of honor dim and hazy;
He lies beneath the sod alone
Where grows the gentle daisy.
Too bad the passing of the years
Should find us all so gay;
It's pretty hard to work up tears-
We have no school today!
-The Pied Piper
We think you've got something there, Pal,
but confidentially we don't think much of the
pen-name. Because, dear public, the gentle-
man who so airily calls himself Pied Piper
is probably as un-pied as anybody we know.
He's an ardent dry.
Believe it or not, we've got a situation. Also
conditions AND contributors-mostly contrib-
utors.
Anyway-
The poets sporadic
And punsters erratic
Who clutter my desk with contributed
rhyme
Are wonderful fellows
And their lyric bellows
Are pretty commendable-part of the
time.

I

If your imported date.
NO

. .
LONGER WRITES-

If your domesticl date. .
WON'T ANSWER THE PHONE-
In fact, if you're havig any trouble-

BUY A

...and keep the memory of soft lights,
and sweet music -ard a real evening!

CALL 2-1214

There's only one worry-
This creative flurry
Has brought to light several with
and finesse
Who seem so prolific,
So blamed scientific,
They'll make a contributor out of
K.S.

brains

and your picture will be delivered
or bring your buck to the

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