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May 26, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-26

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THE MICHIGAN DATLY

ICHIGAN DAILY

.I i/_

,-5

ILBN I TE ^R .MW t~Orf .5T PL N ~J N .111~WC N ..'tM+ 5O( 1+M
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.E
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not. otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by.
Third Assistant Postm~aster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
,nail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone ,2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612. North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago. NationalAdvertising Service, Inc. 11West 42nd
St., New York, N. Y.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR....................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR .......... .....ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR..................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: Ralph G. Coulter, William G. Ferris,
John C. Healey. Robert B. Hewett, George Van Vleck,
Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum, Lois Jotter, Marie
Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS:, Caspar S. Early. Thomas Groehn, Roberti
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Manuel Levin, Irving
F. Levitt, David G. Macdonald. S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell. George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph Shapiro, Marshall D. I
Silverman, L. Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
Marjorie Beck, Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies, Jean Hn-
mer, Florence Harper, Marie Held, Margaret Hiscock,
Eleanor .Johnson, Hilda Laine, Kathleen Maclntyre,
Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, .Mary O'Neill,
Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret Spencer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSXNESS MANAGER.............BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER..............HARRY R. BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........Donna C. Becker
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess, Willian B. Capian, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
ried, Virginia McComb, Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1933

quence of events which would ordinarily run into
sheer "meller-drammer," the story safely remains
within the realm of what is perfect dramatically,
gathering momentum as it unfolds, but never be-
coming ridiculously impossible.
The actress Katherine Hepburn, who has had
such a rapid rise to screen stardom, is a person
who can properly portray the character of Fran-
keau's heroine. Never, to our belief, has she been
given such an excellent opportunity to prove her
abilities as in "Christopher Strong." And she lives
Sup to all that the critics have been saying about
her.
Colin Clive, as the conservative Sir Christopher
Strong, who is as well-known for his fidelity and
happy home life as he is for his parliamentary
addresses, does a superb piece of characterization.
In scenes calling for an emotional play he is
never sloppy; in those requiring activity he is
never flighty. In fact it might be said that, in
playing the conservative, convention-bound
gentleman, Clive does so as a conservative, con-
vention-bound actor-and if that sounds a bit
ambiguous, we mean that, briefly, he fulfills the
part marvelously.
Billie Burke, as Lady Strong, hasn't a great deal
to do in this picture, in comparison, that is, with
the part of Lady Cynthia Darrington, played by
Katherine Hepburn. However, in the few se-
quences calling for any display of.dramatic talent
whatsoever, her work is not lacking in the least.
She still appears a bit sickly-sweet to us but, since
that is so much in keeping with the character of
Lady Strong, perhaps it isn't a just criticism.
Helen Chandler and Ralph Forbes have minor
parts in "Christopher Strong," for which they are
perfectly cast. This point of casting, incidentally,
as well as excellent direction, must be one of the
reasons why the picture is such a dramatic suc-
cess. And the story, as before remarked, though
suggestively too fictional, is nevertheless a grand
vehicle. -E. J. P.
+ ---Eu
Editorial COmmIent
THE VERSAILLES
WAR TREATY
"A smouldering volcano" was the term applied
to Europe last week by fiery Senator Borah in
an address in which he called the Versailles treaty
the real obstacle in the way of success at the dis-
armament and economic conferences.
"There has been no serious situation in Europe
since the peace treaties were signed which has not
been brought about, either directly or indirectly,
because of terms and conditions of these treaties."
Nothing more true or to the point has ever
been said in all the wrangling over disarma-
ment and debts. Behind all the arguments and
disagreements are the hatreds and bitter feelings
which were gathered together and crystallized in
the Versailles treaty.
Senator Borah recalled a remark by Clemenceau'
who said as he signed the peace treaty for France,
"This is a continuation of the war!"
That was a prophecy. Its truth is evidenced by
the strained condition of Europe today. Francei
has the best equipped and most efficient army ini
the world and has served notice that she intends1
to keep it so. Germany has begun to writhe under
the iron boot that has kept her hog-bound and1
abject. Meanwhile the Versailles treaty has beeni
all but suspended temporarily because of the sheer
impossibility of its enforcement; but it stands1
as the law of Europe, fostering dissention and;
hate and rankling prejudices.
The situation is not beyond understanding.
France craves nothing so much as security, and
for good reason. Germany, on the other hand,1
has suffered national degradation and paid trib-
ute almost beyond endurance. She feels the bitter
sting of a huge injustice, and rightly so. All thet
other dissensions in Europe are bound up in the
strained relations between France and Germany.
The problem for the world is to convince France3
that worldpeace is more attractive than nationalI
security and to show her how it can be accomp-I
lished. And before this can be done, the wholeI
hideous foundation of hate upon which the Ver-
sailles treaty was built must be demolished.
-Daily Iowan.
PROFESSORS
AND POLITICS
The most tragic failure of American democracy,
especially in the field of local government, hast

been in the quality of the men who are chosen to
direct the nation's political machinery. In part
this failure is due to the belief of the great mass
of the American people that no special training
is needed for the conduct of public affairs. How-
ever, radical changes in the organization and
complexity of society are at last forcing govern-
ment, reluctantly or otherwise, to depend on spe-
cialists. As this movement has developed it is
gratifying to note the increasing degree to which
politicians turn to university professors for advice.
Princeton especially has reason to be proud of the
part it has played in advising the affairs of gov-
ernment. Nations from South America to Asia
have asked Professor Kemmerer to assist them in
their monteary problems. Last year Governor
Moore invited the School of Public and Interna-
tional Affairs to make a survey of the govern-
ment of New Jersey to be used as a basis for
economies.
An even more important aspect of this develop-
ment is the increasing number of professors who
have themselves been elected to political office
and especially local political office, rather than
merely serving in advisory capacities. Here again
Princeton has played its role in the community's
service. Professor Erdman is serving a term as a
Republican borough councilman. A short time ago
Professor Shull was re-elected to the school board.
Last week Dayton McKean, instructor in the
English Department, was chosen as one of the
three Democratic nominees for the Assembly.
This activity of members of the faculty in local
politics is highly commendable. For it is perhaps
not too fond a hope to believe that the quality of
politics will be improved, not only as university
graduates, but more especially as members of uni-
versity faculties become associated with the direc-
tion of government.

work for many months. Yet we are, on the whole,
a rather optimistic group, although, it is obvious,
a far more sober, serious one than those who
graduated in years of prosperity.
We feel that, in spite of the many who are un-
employed, we have to offer traits and capabilities,
potentialities and promises, that older folk cannot
offer. We are the university students of the de-
pression period. More of our educations have
been paid for by our own efforts than has ever
been the case with members of previous classes.
In that fact there is much of significance.
Some of us have studied.
Others have played football, published news-
papers, and done other things.
But all of us have been sincere in trying to se-
cure what we value most, and now, we are all
young men looking for a job.
We are, America, at your service.-W. E. T.
-Daily Maroon.
T]he Theatre 2
ANGNA ENTERS'
PROGRAM
On Monday and Tuesday evenings, May 29 and
30, Robert Henderson will present the distin-
guished dance-mime, Miss Angna Enters in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Miss Enters will
present different numbers on each evening. She
will be accompanied by Mr. Kenneth Yost. Her
program for Monday evening will be as follows:
1. Geschichten aus dem
Wienerwald .... . ............Johann Strauss
2. Felin e ......................Claude Debussy
"Instead of a woman dressed up as a cat, we
saw a cat with the body of a woman."-James
Laver in the London "Studio."
3. .Promenade ...................... Waldteufel
4. Delsarte--with a not too classical nod
to the Greeks.
A handy guide to the movements and expres-
sion of this item:
Dramatic Position No. 1 Aversion
Dramatic Position No. 2 Pleading
Grace Terror
Discernment Supplication
Joy or Gladness Grief
Freedom Tragedy
Listening Sorrow
Secrecy Remorse
Anticipation Resignation
Welcome Longing
Reproach Devotion
Defiance Nobility
Scornful dismissal Ecstacy
N. B.-Miss Enters will not engage in any cor-
respondence concerning the universal and ulti-
mate truth, not to say accuracy, of these "inter-
pretations."
5. Moyen Age...................Frescobaldi
First abstract Mediaeval religious primitive pre-
sented in America. . . . And that wit that we see
in the Moyen Age, where the red figure of the Ma-
donna shows an old Flemish heaviness and naive
beauty, a gauche and touching vision, and at the
same time no little reminder of that folk gro-
tesque and gross intuition that we detect in the
figures of many a reredos and screen and in the
figures, ecstatic, and droll at once, on facades
like Chartres and Notre Dame, in Quentin Matsys
and in many an altar piece or chapel panel."-
Stark Young in "The New Republic."
INTERMISSION

FRESHMAN
LANTERN DANCE
Michigan League Ballroom
MAY 27 9-12
Tickets $1.00 at League Desk
and Angdli Hall
Ann Arbor
Monday, May 29
1700 BLOCK ON PACKARD
TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY
MAT. 3:45 - NIGHT 8 P.M.
Special Reduced
Prices Hee!

LAWN MOWERS.
GARDEN TOOLS
y
A, Comnplete Line _
Of Asheny (,adehFER-
110 S. Asiley St. Plione 2-4

And Seeds for
Every Purpose

'ILIZERS
1614

Ann Arbor Implement Co.

CHIILDREN

A)ULTiS
3C

THE ORiGINAL
GENTRY BROS.
FAMOUS SHOWS
HENRY B. GENTRY
der and Manager
The shows that cater especially
to REFINED AUDIENCES of
LADIES and CHILDREN.
Yes, the Snyder Family of
DANCING DOGS
and the MONKEY FIRE
DEPT. are with them.
Visit the show grounds Sunday
afternoon and let the children
get a "close-up" of the animal
actors.

Tj
SUMMER SPECIALS
Salads - Sandwiches - Sundaes
Served at Our Regular Low Prices
LUNCHEONS and DINNERS from 15c Up
Ann Arbtr's Largest and COOLEST Restaurant - Established 1899
Dancing during dinner Friday, Saturday and
Sunday evenings 6:15 - 7:30
MUSIC BY DRUCKENBRODWS VICThR'S

DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS ARE INEXPENSIVE
RESULTS COUNT
Quality in Mimeographed Copies can be obtained only
by using Genuine A. B. DICK & CO.'s products
For Supplies and Service, Call

AHR'S BOONIVERSITY
BOKSTORE
316 State Street

O'Brien's Assertion
And Laird's Apathy.

_..... _ 1

. .

T WOULD be impossible to over-
emphasize the significance of City-
Attorney Laird's declaration Wednesday night
that he "didn't know" whether or not he would
request another opinion from Lansing, his original
letter seemingly having been misplaced. In those
words he revealed that neither he nor the dry,
members of the Common Council care particularly
whether or not the Division Street charter amend-
ment. prohibiting East Side beer is constitutional.
Yet that it is constitutional has been the chief
reason given for refusing to grant East Side mer-
chants licenses.
At first everyone who took a broadminded view
of the matter credited the dry meibers of the
council with at least being sincere. To accuse the
elected representatives of the people of giving
false explanations of their public acts is some-
thing few responsible persons care .to do. Yet
the attitude of the drys on the council and of
City Attorney Laird, during the past few days,
points strongly to this conclusion.
In addition to Mr. Laird's expression of indif-
ference, it is becoming increasingly apparent that
the council drys have been rather petty in refus-
ing to consider Attorney General O'Brien's opin-
ion merely because it was not specifically ad-
dressed to them. Mr. O'Brien said Wednesday this
was "the most ridiculous thing" he had "ever
heard of." He said he had every intention that
his opinion, addressed to Representative Pack,
should be "an official interpretation of the pres-
ent law to the entire council."
Potent evidence that the attorney-general is
correct in his view that the Division Street re-
stricion is unconstitutional has been furnished by
the degree to which the eminent lawyers of the
State including most of the faculty of the U.ni-
versity Law School have concurred in it, and is
now virtually clinched by Judge Verdier's decision
in a parallel case in Grand Rapids. Alderman
Sadler has said he would remain opposed to
granting the licenses until there should be a
court decision on the validity of the Division
Street rule. The Division Street rule itself has
not come before a court yet, but Alderman Sadler
should be able to see how it will be decided if and
when a judgment is given.
If the council's real reason for withholding
the licenses has nothing to do with constitutional-
ity, it is only fair to ask them to say so. Repre-
sentatives who resort to subterfuge cannot expect
to retain faver with their constituents.
Screen Rflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars. kep a wavfrom it.

6.

Antique a la Francaise
(very Directoire) .................... Gretry

". ..in the dress the French ladies were hesi-
tating between Anglomania and a passion for the
antique. Thus, they flavoured their austere Da-
vidian Greek costumes with coyness . . . Napo-
leon thought the French composers, Gretry in
particular, who was the private passion of the
plebian aristocrats of his court, too 'scientific.'
He preferred the wordier Italians. The French,
however, were more discriminating."-A. E.
7. Piano Music: A dance of adolescence
8. Pavana-Spain, 16th Century
"She has great command of the sinister-wit-
ness her 'Pavana' from 16th century Spain, in
which she appears as a sullen young fury, going
through the conventional steps of a dance while
her thoughts are full of murder or some kindred
horror."-W. A. Darlington in London "Daily
Telegraph."
9. Auto da Fe-Spain, 15th Century.
Auto da Fe (or Act of Faith) was the generally
culminating ritual of torture to which the victims
of the Inquisition-Jews, Moores, "witches," or
anyone offensive to those in power-were sub-
jected. An Auto da Fe was an act of faith by tor-
ture, and was celebrated for purposes of enter-
tainment at the marriages of Kings, and birth of
Princes, or just for the fun of it. The red circle
on the breast was a compulsory symbol of the
taint of Jewishness.
10 Boy Cardinal-Spain, 16th Century
"'Boy Cardinal' is a pungent characteriza-
tion to be placed with the earlier and more evil
'Cardinal,' the sinister 'Pavana,' and other of her
medieval personages. He is already slightly foul,
cynical and callous, but he has not yet relin-
quished the frivolous exuberance natural to his
callow years. In spite of the odor of spice quite
foreign to the incense of his assumed holiness,
this scarlet boy is not altogether unlikable. The
composition contains a brilliant surprise."-Mary
Watkins, New York "Herald-Tribune."
11. Field Day ............ .............Sousa
INTERMISSION
12. Queen of Heaven
(French Gothic) ........... Gautier de Coinci
"In the Western Church (Roman Catholic) the
Virgin had always been highly honored, but it
was not until the Crusades that she began to
overshadow the Trinity itself. The Virgin even had
additional charm of the public that she was pop-
ularly supposed to have no very marked fancy for
priests as such. She was a queen, a woman, and a

Bulletin!
MI LTONS
SH-OP FOR MEN
119 South Main Street
Just received 100 pairs of
Plain White Buck and Calf.
All sizes.
Spori: Shoe
J: J
This season's greatest shoe
values. We have them also
in Black and White, Tan
and White and the Two
Tone Tans. .
All One Price .3,
Come to Miltons
for Your
SLACKS0
We have the most complete
assortment in Ann Arbor
to choose from--
$ to 34
45 j.45

3

SPECIAL!I
for
Decoration
Day
Choice Box
UTJf FIOWERS
$1.00
Plants for bedding, 10c and
up. Coleous, Geraniums, Pe-

tunias, etc.

Combination

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MICHIGAN
DAILY
CLASSIFIE DS
THEY PRESENT
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR PROFIT
DAILY

plant arrangements suitable
for all outside purposes.
$l.00 -$1.50.
and Up
For the "Week-End" box of
assorted flowers or all roses,
an exceptional value at $1.00

Plain whites, greys,
stripes, plaids

tans,

The
University
Flower Shop)
Incorporated

White ducks $1.00 pair
Straw Hats 95c to $1.95

I

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