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May 21, 1933 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-21

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8S JNDAV, MAY 2N, 1,93?

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_.

Wolves Take Big
Ten Track .Title

Matt Mann Studies Red Sox' Hits

Doping; Finds That
Results Are Mental

Uy Wteia"1
_ __By ART CASTENS
Some Englishmen must always be
Two First-Place Awards shown. It goes against their grain
And 18-Point Total Is to take anybody's word for anything,
Matt Mann is just such a native of
Ward's Contribution the Bonnie Isles, as the matter of
oxygen doping prves.
(Continued from Page 1) Several months ago Mann, Varsity
third, K em p, Michigan; fourth, swimming coach here, fired a volley
Stap, , Ohi tMe ichgKan;forth, that echoed around the sport worldi
Stapf, Ohio State; fifth,, Kennicott, whnh]cuedteJpns
Illinois. Time. :21.5. (Betters West- when he accused the Japanese
ern Conference record around one Olympic swimmers of unethical prac-
turn of :21.6 by Archie Hahn, Michi- tices for taking oxygen before enter-
gan, 1903). 'aing the water for a race.
High jump-Won by Ward, Michi- Medical authorities from far and
gan; second, Olson, Northwestern; wide sprang to the defense of the
third, Smith, Wisconsin, and Read, Nipponese, saying that such "dop-
Northwestern, tied for third; Orn- ing," if only oxygen were used, could
stein, Illinois, and Moiso, Michigan, have no helpful effect.
tied for fifth. Height, 6 feet 2 3-4 "Doping Is Unethical"
inches. Mann believed all this, what's
Broad jump-- Won by Brooks, Chi- more, he didn't care much about
cago; second, Ward, Michigan; third, that part of it, he was just protest-
Adams, Illinois; fourth, Duggins, ing against the use of stimulants in
Northwestern; fifth, Jones, Wiscon- general, but after the regular swim-
sin, 24 feet 5 3-4 inches. ming season was over, he and sev-
One-mile relay--Won by Indiana eral of his disciples went into a hud-
(Harpol, Bicking, 1lornbostel, Fu- dle over the matter.
qua); second, Ohio State; third, Willing to try anything, they im-
Michigan; fourth, Illinois; fifth, Pur- ported a tank of oxygen and fed it
due. (Iowa finished fourth but dis- indiscriminately to one another,
qualified for foul). Time, 3:20.2 inisrateywth e an ,
220-yard low hurdles-Won by Kel- 1until, sated with the exhilarating
ler, Ohio State;, second, Eglin element, they started trying to crack
lechioa;tate;,secokndEgeston, h all existing swim records-with re-
Michgan; third, DeBakr, Michigan; Ilts that were absolutely nil.
fourth, Duggins, Northwestern; fifth, Jim that Jonny ciler
Brooks, Chicago. Time, :23.5. (New Jim Cristy, Johnny Schmieler,
Conference record around one turn. Frank Kennedy, Tex Robertson, Bob
Former record :23.8 by Charles Lawrence, and a host of others swam
Brookins, Iowa, 1924). ev'ery.thing from 50 yards to 440 try-l
Pole vault---Lennington and Seeley, ing to set records, but no marks fell.
Illinois, and Wonsowicz, Ohio State, Schmieler Exhilarated
tied for first; Lovshin, Wisconsin, Amateur Oxygen Dispenser Mann
and Divich, Indiana, tied for fourth. tried all sorts of methods of admin-1
Height, 13 feet 6 inches. istering it. He fed it to SchmielerT
Two-mile run-Won by Watson, for six or eight minutes and last;
Indiana; second, Woolsey, Illinois; year's captain said he felt as thoughI
third, Hill, Michigan; fourth, William his head were bouncing on the ceil-
Howell, Michigan; fifth, Currell, Min- ing, and that he could have licked1
nesota. Time, 9:29.9. his weight in pythons, but the rec-
120-yard high hurdles-Won by ords refused to be broken.t
Keller, Ohio State; second, Ward, So Mann concludes his investiga-
Michigan; third, Sandbach, Purdue; tiorn thus: "Oxygen has no detect-s
fourth, Pantlind, Michigan; fifth, able physical effect on athletes. ItsF
Scheifley, Minnesota. Time, :14.1. only possible influence is purely
(Betters Western Conference record mental, making the player or swim-
of :14.4 by Lee Sentman, Illinois, mer feel highly exhilarated, and ablet
1931, and accepted world record of to far surpass his usual ability." a
:14.2 by Percy Beard, New York A.C.,
1931: equals national collegiate rec- diana; second, Kamm, Illinois; third,
ord of :14.1 by George Shaling, Iowa, Holzhauer, Ohio State; fourth,
1932). Schmelze, Northwestern; fifth, Cum-
880-yard run-Won by Hornbostel, mings, Illinois. Distance, 142 feet
Indiana; second, Turner, Michigan; 11 3-4 inches.
third, Crossman, Purdue; fourth, Shot put-Won by Kamm, Illi-F
Brown, Ohio State; fifth, Lemen, nois; second, Cook, Illinois; third,r
Michigan. Time, 1:54.4. Neal, Ohio State; fourth, Biddinger,E
Discus throw-Won by Busbee, In- Indiana; fifth, Blumenfeld, Michi-c
gan. Distance, 47 feet 3 3-4 inches.C
100-yard dash - Won by Ward,E
EAITrIw Michigan; second, Hellmich, Illinois;C
third, Kemp, Michigan; fourth,F
Thompton, Minnesota; fifth, Stapf,
Ohio State. Time :09.6.g
One-mile run-Won by Hornbos-C
tel, Indiana; second, William Howell,
B rrs A C Michigan; third, Popejoy, Purdue;a
fourth, Bott, Iowa; fifth, Woolsey,a
Illinois. Time, 4:21.5.
D ,Mm,440-yard run-Won by Fuqua, In-l
diana; second, McQueen, Purdue;>
third, DeBaker, Michigan; fourth,
A A Ellerby, Michigan; fifth, Teitelbaum,1
Ohio State. Time, :48.6. (New West-a
C* 1 . ern Conference record around two
turns; former record :48.7 by Edwins
Russel Mihiam 131) A

Down Tigers'
By Single Rium
Foxx Blasts Out 2 Home
Runs To Beat Cleveland;
Yanks Lose To Browns
The Boston Pink Hose blasted out
five runs off Whitlow Wyatt in the
fifth and sixth innings of yesterday's!
Detroit-Boston set-to in the Hub
City, enough to defeat Bucky Harris'
tribe, 6 to 5. Wyatt allowed two runs
in the fifth after relieving Bridges
and three runs in the sixth until he
was retired in favor of Schoolboyi
Rowe. 1
At New York the mighty Babe
failed to collect the circuit drive he
had promised to
ai s orphan - hero
friends, and the
Yanks went down
efore St. Louis 4
o 2, although Laz-
::' eri hit for the
ircuit in the
nnth. Jimmy Fox
)f the Athletics set
ab o u t defending
ais championship
and sent balls in-
o the bleachers
IsABE RUTII Twice during the
Athletic-Cleveland
game, which the A's won 3 to 2.
AMyERICAN LEAGUE

Illini Trounce
Michigan Ball
Team,12 To 1
(Continued from Page 1)
Then Chervinko doubled to clear the

PLAY & BY-PLAY
By AL NEWMAN

bases.
BOX SCORE
Illinois AB R
Lewis, 3b .........5 3
Bisbee. 3b......... 0
IMcCabe, if .......4 2
Moyer, If........0 0
Frink lb........4 1
Toncoff, rf.......3 3
Goldstein, 2b.....5 1
Depken. 2b......0 0
Theobald, cf......5 1
SYule,ss.........4 0
Chervinko, c .....4 1
Wrobke, p... ...0 0

H
3
0
2
0
2
2
3
0
0
0
2
1

U
1
0
1
0
9
1
3
0
6
1
4
1

A
3
0
0
0
1
0
3
0
0
1
1
3

E
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Totals .......38 12 15 27 12 1

Michigan
Artz, rf ......
Waterbor, 2b .
Braendle, If, .
Petoskey, cf
Diffley, c ....
Manuel, ss .. .
Wistert, lb p
Menefee, p ..
Meltzer, p ..
Oliver, 3b ...
Patchin, p
Regeezi, 3b . .

AB R
. 4 0
. .2 0
..4 0
....4 0
. ..3 0
. .2 0
. 0 0
. 1 0
.. 4 1
. 2 0
....2 '-0

H
2
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0

0
1
4
1
1
7
0
3
0
0
0
3
4

A
0
2
0
0
0
5
1
1
0
1
2
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Football Predictions
READING the sports column by
Maury Koblentz of the Ohio
State Lantern, we find ourselves'
highly in sympathy with the follow-
ing extracts...
"Seatecat the radio the other
evening, far from thoughts of the
sports world, we were startled by the
following sentence which echoed
forth from the loud speaker:
'Northwestern is the favorite to
take the Big Ten football title, with
Minnesota running a close second,'
were the words of the announced.
"Maybe so, maybe so, but it's our
hunch that the radio sports an-
nouncer was an old student of North-
western or Minnesota, otherwise he
would have taken a little time in
thinking before he made the out-
spoken statement that he did.
"He went ahead to point out that
the Wildcats will have a large, as
well as fast eleven. As for Minne-
sota,,he pointed to the fact that only
four regulars will be lost to the
Gophers . . .
"Since the question of football
champions is in the offing, we will
take this opportunity to boldly pro-
claim that the fight for the Big Ten
football diadem will be between
OHIO STATE and MICHIGAN. We
doubt whether the Wildcats from
Northwestern will even place among
the first four .
"Listen, neighbor, you tell me how
opposing backs are going to crash
through a line that contains Gailus,
TFeitelbaini's Inju1ry Is
Cause For Infield Shift
When Michigan's baseball- team
played Purdue last Friday, Jack
Teitlebaum received a knee injury
which caused his absence from the
shortstop position for yesterday's tilt
with Illinois.
Teitlebaum is recovering at Lafay-
ette hospital. In the meantime,
Coach Ray Fisher is using a new in-
field combination featuring the lanky
Ken Manuel at short and Whitey
Wistert at first. Manuel handled four
chances without an error against
Purdue and Wistert came through
without a bungle.
The men were used at the same
positions yesterday in the Illinois
contest.

Rosequist, and Gillman on one side
with Tanski or Monahan, Conrad,
and Padlow on the other side. Don't
forget that Mickey Vuchinich or Pete
Delich, two of the best defensive
players in the conference, will hold
the center position which makes the
State eleven all the stronger defen-
sively.
"THE OHIO STATE backfield will
take care of itself with such
men as Cramer, Oliphant, Keefe,
Heekin, and Wetzel to supply the
needed offensive punch.
"Michigan will have its entire team
back with the exception of two play-
ers. One of them, Harry Newman,
All-America quarterback, undoubted-
ly leaves the largest gap on the Wol-
verine eleven.
"Should the Michigan squad un-
cover a, passer of average ability, its
problems are solved since the Wol-
verines have plenty of receivers not-
withstanding the fact that Ivan Wil-
liamston, star end, is the other reg-
ular lost to Michigan.
"The Wolverines have been consis-
tently outplayed when it came to a
running game. A good aerial attack
has been the fundamental cause for
Michigan's success in the past years.
Passing will be the keynote of its
offensive tactics next fall, which we
again predict will put the Wolverines
at the top of the heap-if Ohio State
is not perched there."
Just so, but there was one glaring
defect possessed by the Buckeyes last
fall about which nothing was said
in the above column. If Ohio State
would beat Michigan next fall, a pass
defense is required. A word to the
wise
Lansing Eastern
Wins In 5-A Meet
Five records fell as Lansing East-
ern High School won the 5-A cham-
pionship track meet with 50 and 5-6
points in a combination 5-A meet
and regional competition to decide
the representative to the approach-
ing State meet yesterday afternoon
at Ferry Field.

New York ........ .
Washington
Cleveland
Chicago ............
Philadelphia ........
D etroit .............
St.. Louis ...........
Boston . .......
Boston, 6-9--0, H.

W. L. Pet.
19 10 .621
19 13 .594
18 14 .563
16 13 .552
14 14 .500
12 17 '.414
13 19 .406-
9 19 .3211
Johnson and

Ferrell; Detroit, 5--8-1, Bridges,
Wyatt, Rowe, Hayworth, and Desau-
tels.
Philadelphia, 3-11--0, Cain, Grove,
and Cochrane; Cleveland, 2-6-1,
Hudlen, Harder, Craighead, and
Spencer
St. Louis, 4-9-0, Herbert and
Shea; New York, ?2-6-0, Ruffing
and Dickey.
Washington, 7-14-1, Weaver and
Sewell; Chicago, 0-5-1, Lyons, Hev-
ing, Frazier, and Grube.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W. L. Pet.
Pittsburgh ......... 20 10 .667
New York .......... 17 11 .563
Brooklyn ...........13 12 .520
St. Louis ........... 16 15 .516
Cincinnati..........14 15 .483
Boston .............16 18 .444
Chicago ............ 13 17 .433
Philadelphia ........ 10 21 .323
Boston, 4-7-0, Cantwell and Har-
grave; Pittsburgh, 2-9-0, Meine,
Chagnon, and Padden.
Pittsburgh, 7-10-1, Swift, Harris,
and Padden; Boston, 6-11-0, Betts
and Hogan.
Philadelphia, 7-9-2, Pearce, Col-
lins, and Davis; Cincinnati, 6-13-1,
Kolp, Johnson and Lombardi.
Chicago, 3-6-1, Warneke and
Hartnett; Brooklyn, 1-5-1, Benge
and Lopez.
St. Louis, 4-9-0, Dean and Wil-
son; New York, 1-11-0, Bell, Uhle,
and Mancuso.

Totals .......31 1 5 2412 1
Two base hits-McCabe, Lewis,
Chervenko, Frink, -2. Sacrifice hit-
Moyer. Double plays-Lewis to Gold-
stein to Frink; Manuel to Waterbor
to Wistert; Wrobke to Goldstein to
Frink. Left on bases-Illinois 6,
Michigan 8. Bases on balls-Off
Wrobke 5, Wistert 1, Menefee 1,
Struck out-By Wrobke 2, Wistert
4, Melztler 1. Hits-Off Patchin 8 in
4 2-3 innings, Wistert 5 in 2 1-3 in-
nings, Menefee 2 in 1-3, Melzter 0 in
2-3. Losing pitcher-Patchin. Passed
balls - Diffley 1. Wild pitches -
Wrobke 1, Wistert 1. Hit by pitcher
-by Patchin (Frink). Time 2:05.
McGraw's Record With
Giants A Good One
Here's a record: During John Mc-
Graw's years as manager the New
York Giants won 3,555 games and
lost 2,754. At that figure, McGraw
could not have lost more games than
he won if he managed teams that
lost every game for the next five
years.

i4 Ci A.SL'lly l lll:lll {1+lly lilJl.) '

C

NO

i.

I

FACTORY HAT STORE
(W. W. Mann)
THIS IS PANAMA HAT TIME
The American Hatter's Journal says: "The public ought to be told
that Cleaning and Blocking a hat is as serious a job as making a new one,
and that no one but A hatter should be allowed to do the work."
People in Ann Arbor are accustomed to wearing good hats, but the
beauty of thousands of dollars worth of nice heats is ruined every year
by those who are not hatters and know nothing whatever about the
technique of hat making.
The result is that felt hats subjected to such treatment, while seem-
ing to be nicely done when taken from such places, soon become fuzzy
looking and get to be just flimsy affairs; and Panama hats, being covered
with a paste to hide the dirt, become just a mess.
But how can the public know where to take a hat to have it Cleaned
and Blocked properly, since all cleaners are glib at ad writing? Just
remember this: Wherever there is a real hatter, you will find that they
make New Hats, as well as do Cleaning and Blocking work; when you
leave your hat in such a place you make no mistake.
Makers of fine hats, such as Stetson, Dobbs, and Knox, charge
much more than we do for the same class of work; how then can others
do good work for less? Obviously they cannot; and such work is as
inferior to genuine Factory Hat Work as counterfeit is to real money.
Our price is 50 cents minimum charge for Felt Hats and 75 cents
minimum charge for Panama Hats - the only place in Ann Arbor
where new hats are made, or where you can get genuine Factory Hat
Work in Cleaning and Blocking hats.
FACTORY HAT STORE
(W. W. Mann)
617 Packard Street (Near State)

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DUE TO THE SUCCESS OF OUR
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11- 731 -1-=TT-llW- 1----M-9 i e n

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