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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-06

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FOUR

TH, E MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Senate Committee would remain much as it is
today, but this group of faculty members in touch
with student opinion could not fail to be more in-
clined to favor a suggestion from a Council the
members of which have shown themselves to be
trustworthy and capable of attaining positions of
importance on the campus, than by a Council
elected on a basis of shady campus politics.
The University Council will meet May 8 to de-
cide the fate of these two proposed reorganiza-
tions. If the faculty body rejects both plans or,
adopts the first one the situation will remain the
same and the problem of obtaining an effective
form of student government at Michigan will be
handed down to future generations of students.
If, on the other hand, the University Council rat-
ifies the plan of government by recognized campus
leaders, it may be that next year the Student
Council will become a power instead of a joke on
the campus.
There may be faults in the plan that are as
yet undiscovered, but nothing could be less ef-
fective than the present plan of student govern-
ment. We urge the University Council to consider
thoroughly before they turn down the second plan
as just another silly idea. '

Published every morning except Monday during th
University year and Summer Session by the Board ir
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER O TE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated PressIs exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it o
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of specia
dspatches are reserved.-
Entered at the Post Ofice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, a
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted b
Third Assistant Postaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
tall,$4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214. -
.Representative: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITOIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925'
MANAGING EDITOR...............FRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR......................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR..................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renhan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSIS'ANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman.
REPORTER: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Donald R.
Bird, Richard Boebel, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G.
Coulter, Harold A. Daisher, Caspar S. Early, Waldron
Eldridge, Ted Evans, William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel,
Thomas Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, John C. Healey,
Robert B. Hewett, George M. Holmes, Joseph L. Karpin-
ski, Milton Keiner, Matthew Lefkowtz, Manuel Levin,
Irving Levitt, David G. MacDonald, Proctor McGeachy,
Sidney Moyer, Joel P. Newman, John O'Connell, Ken-
neth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George Quimby, Floyd
Rabe, William Reed, Edwin W. Richardson, Rich-
ard Rome, H. A. Sanders, Robert E. Scott, Adolph
'Shapiro, Marshall D. Silverman, Wilson L. Trimmer,
George Van Vleck, Philip Taylor Van Zile, William
Weeks, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Dorothy Adams, Barbara Bates, Marjorie Beck, Eleanor
B. Blum, Frances Carney, Betty Connor, Ellen Jane
Cooley,. Margaret Cowie, Adelaide Crowell, Dorothy
Dishman, Gladys M. Draves, Jeanette Duff, Dorothy
Gies, Carol J. Hanan, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper,
Marie Hed, Margaret Hiscock, Eleanor Johnson, Lois
Jotter, Hilda Lare, Helen Levison, Kathleen MacIntyre,
Josephine McLean, Anna Miller, Mary Morgan, Marjorie
Morrison, Marie Murphy, Mary M. O'Neill, Margaret D.
Phalan. Jane Schneider, Barbara' Sherburne, Mary .E
Simpson, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret Spencer, Miriam
P. Stark, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER ............... HARRY R. BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......Donna C. Becker
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess, Willian B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
immy, Billie Grifiths, Catherine MHenry May See-
fried, Virginia McComb, Meria Abbot Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
SATURDAY, MAY 6, 1933
Cap Night's
Crisis. .
HE QUESTION "Is Cap Night, or a
similar freshman function, to con-
tinue?" will probably be answered once for all
during Spring Homecoming when the 1933 ver-
sion of Cap Night-"Freshman Night"-will be
given its trial. There will be no bonfire, no burn-
ing of caps, and, it may be expected, not the
former enthusiasm.
Whether the sponsors of this year's "Freshman
Night" have done a wise thing in eliminating the
most spectacular event on the annual program is
most certainly debatable. Nothing remains now
except the presentation of the M-blankets, a
speech or two by "campus leaders" and the Var-
sity Band. It can be safely said that the first
two named have but little popular appeal, while
the band may or may not draw an acceptable
crowd by itself.
Inevitably, and we believe wisely, "Freshman
Night" will prove a mere adjunct to Lantern
Night. Cap Night has always centered about a
bonfire. Through the "tradition's" waning years
the blazing pyre was retained, but this year's
shift seems a tacit admission of the futility of the
whole business.
Stud fnt Government
The Final Whisper .*. *
W ITH the spring all-campus elections
almost due it is time to raise a final
whisper in favor of the Student Council reorgani-
zation plans about which so much was heard two

months ago but which now seem to have disap-
peared forever into the red tape of the University
Council.
One plan, presented by the leading campus poli-
ticians, was for a bi-partisan house with a lower
house elected under much the same system now in
use and with an upper house practically the same
as the present Senate Committee on Student Af-
fairs which has Uhe veto power on all Student
Council measures.
The faults in this plan are obvious. It would in
no way remedythe present situation. The mem-
bers of the lower house would be elected, as they
are now, because they have a fraternity brother
who is a potent campus politician, or because they
have done a favor for the president of the coun-
cil. Once having attained the position of coun-
cilman they would still be content to rest on their
laurels and take things easy. As today, the position
of president of the council would be a political

are chiefly: low spear grass, meadow fescue, panic
grass, canary grass and velvet grass.
Weeds-The plant families to which the various
species of weeds known to cause hay fever belong
may be divided into two groups:
Group I. Of primary importance.
The Ragweed family
The Thistle family.
Group II Of secondary importance.
The Pigweed family
The Goosefoot family
The Plantain family
The Buckwheat family.
The Hemp family
Fortunately few species of weeds adequately
satisfy the requirements of each of the five pos-
tulates,
One cannot discuss the subject of hay fever
without mentioning the relation to other groups
of symptoms, which heretofore have appeared not
to be related to each other. at all. The two prin-
cipal members of this group are asthma and hay
fever. One also must add to this list urticaria
(hives), Vaso-motor rhinitis (or perennial hay
fever), angioneurotic edema (intermittent swell-
ing), some forms of dermatitis (eczema), someI
forms of gastro-intestinal upsets, migraine (sick
headache) and some other conditions. All these
different groups of symptoms are aspects (cycles)
of the same phenomenon of sensitization known
as human hypersensitiveness. We know there is
a sequence of events. We claim that this pheno-
menon of sensitization is progressive, growing
worse and worse.
(Concluded in Sunday's Issue)
-Health Service.

' Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to.be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
EDITOR GILBRETH LECTURES ON
COMMUNISM-AH THERE, EDITOR
To the Editor:
The editorial in the May 4th edition of the
Daily on May 1st demonstrations is characterized
by a sweet naivete which would have been touch-
ing in a child, but which is repulsive in a person
who has not been officially certified to be feeble'-
minded. Either the man is atrociously ignorant or
downright mendacious in view of the well known
facts.
Mr. Gilbreth, do you know of one single May
Day demonstration in which communists got to-
gether . and threw bricks through the mayor's
window? When have communists advocated ter-
rorism and Nihilism? Do you not know that the
Community Party immediately expels from its
ranks any member who advocates such methods?
Why don't you read the Communist Manifesto and
learn that mass action is the only weapon em-
ployed by the communists? The only riots are
those conducted by the officers of the law, the
police.
Detroit and New York newspapers admit that
this year the largest May Day demonstrations
ever witnessed in America were held. This con-
tradicts the statement of the decline of radicalism
made by you. The New York Times states that
there were at least three times as many in the
Communist demonsteration as in the Socialist
demonstration. This again contradicts your state-
ment that the Socialists are taking over the ter-
ritory occupied by the communists.
You say that the people of the United States
are growing tired of the Nihilists. Sure, but what
has that to do with the Communists. We sug-
gest that Mr. Gilbreth find out the difference be-
tween Communists, Socialists, Anarchists, and Ni-
hilists instead of using these terms indiscrimi-
nately in one senseless jumble. You mention that
EVEN laborers are growing intolerant of radical-
ism. This conviction obviously rests on the fact
that Mr. Gilbreth reads only his own newspaper,
the Daily. For how otherwise can one explain his
total disregard of the columns and columns of
newspaper space given to those spontaneous MASS
uprisings where workers and farmers throughout
the United States are "taking the law into their
own hands."
May we point out that the Detroit Leader was
an official Socialist paper and that its closing
down was, therefore, NOT "another evidence of
the declining interest of the public of the policies
of the more violent reds" as you stated. On the
contrary this merely demonstrates that the So-
cialists are losing ground withthe working class,
NOT the communists. You haven't seen the clos-
ing down of the Michigan Worker, the Commu-
nist paper. On the contrary, its circulation is in-
creasing daily.
Now how about the B.E.P. example of "the red
agitators being thrown out of camp by the SIN-
CERE members of the "army.' May we remind
Mr. Gilbreth, that Waters, the SINCERE leader
of the B.E.F. is at the present moment wintering
in Florida on the money he raked off from the
B.E.F. escapade, whilst his guilless followers are
back in their Hoovervilles. The SINCERE Mr.
Waters is all for the "new deal" and says that a
bonus march is no longer necessary. This, lnind
you, in face of the half billion cut of the veteran's
budget by Roosevelt. Meanwhile these bad red
agitators are organizing a new bonus march from
the ranks 'of those very people whom the SIN-
CERE Mr. Waters betrayed.
Even Norman Thomas would blush at the label
"peaceful reformist" that you give him. You
haven't even caught up with the Socialists who in
words at least, have long ago thrown over the
policy of peaceful reform. In words only, of
course.
To conclude on a hopeful note, perhaps after
you graduate and join the ranks of the 18,000,000
unemployed, you will give Communism and Com-
munists a little more careful study, and come to
more logical conclusions.
-Lilya Sagal.

Student Health
HAY FEVER-
(Continued from Friday's Issue)
The Grasses. All the grasses have a similar hay
fever reaction, but this similarity differs in de-
gree. There are many grasses, the pollen of which
though containing an excitant of hay fever are
nevertheless of no consequence as causes of the

More Money Is
eulng Releaed ..
Wise Merchants are pre-t
parngfor Increased Sales
,by having More Advertis-
ing ,Released!
The Michigan Daily offers
the Best Means of reach-
ing Ann Arbor's Better
Ihiying iPulic.

Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no.stars keep away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"A LADY'S PROFESSION"
*AMUSING COMEDY OF
AMATEUR RACKETEERS
The lady's profession, in this case, is that of a
dabbler in rackets. Alison Skipworth, who looks
and acts a great deal like Marie Dressler, is the
lady.
The story begins when a fine old English fam-
ily, consisting of Alison Skipworth, Roland Young
who plays the part of her brother, and Sari Marit-
za, who takes the role of his daughter, goes broke
and comes over to America to recoup its fortunes.
Roland Young gets mixed up, inevitably, with the
bootlegging racket and Alison Skipworth has to
step in and straighten things out.
In the meantime Sari has fallen in love with a
rich American's son and everything comes out
all right.
The story, however, is inconsequential. There
is a great deal to enjoy in this picture for those
who like Roland Young's bland idiocy and deft
mannerisms. Alison Skipworth roars about in a
thoroughly imposing manner. This is the first, or
nearly the first, picture in which Sari Maritza,
whose pictures you have undoubtedly seen in the
Sunday supplements, appears in Ann Arbor. She
plays the part of a nice young girl in this picture
and does it very well.
This is, on the whole, quite an amusing picture.
-B. S.-

S*'TARS

. ...

&L STRIPES

By Karl Seiffert
A Boston policeman who dislocated a vertebra
with a violent sneeze is awaiting for another
paroxysm to put it back in place. Well, he may
be right, but a disjointed spine is nothing to
sneeze at.
PARASITES LIVE
IN THE OCEANS
-Headline
Therr apparently it wouldn't be any use
trying to drown 'em when they ask for a
cigarette.
"How Long Since You Said, 'I Feel Like a
Two-Year-Old'?" asks an ad. Well let's see-how
long is it since we've lost a garter on the dance
floor?
* * *
One of the ladies of the Law School has been
censured for singing in class, and the suspicion
is that she's been concentrating on torts songs.
SLY WINK DEPT.
"If Mayor Murphy is part of the Michigan
political program for the next few years he
should stay there. The office deserves the un-
divided attention of the best man the Admin-
istration can place in Malacanan. Proper serv-
ice here does not make votes there."
-The Manila Bulletin, Philippine Islands.
Flieder told the court that Merrick's aim was
bad on the first shot. "What made me mad,
Judge," he said, "was when he picked up a beef
kidney and threw it at me."-News Item.
You wouldn't kidney, would you mister?
DAY OF LOW PAY
H A S VANISHED
-Headline
Yeah, that went with the last jobs to get
eliminated.
* * *
CLASSIFIED AD: Lincoln touring in perfect
condition; bargain. $100.
Say, we'd pay $100 to see old Honest Abe right
now no matter what shape he was in.
* * *
Mr. George Spelvin of this page remarked the

Religious Activities
FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH CHURCH
State and Washington Streets Washington St. at 5th Ave.
Sta Ws goSe E. C. Stellhorn, pastor
Ministers AJ1L
Frederick B Fisher ATTEND 9 A.M.-Bible School. Lesson Topics
Peter F. Stair "JESUS EXALTS SERVICE"
"WI-AT PLADC hA RELIGION 4I.J~ 19 A.M.-Servlce In German.
IN EDUCATION?"
10:30 Ud TUEWW
A symposium by RE# - U LAR LY 10:30 A.M.--Service with sermon on:
'President DANIEL L. MARSH'SRO TANF ME
Boston UniversityA"SORROW TRANSFORMED
Dr. FREDERICK B. FISHER INTO JOY"
Pulpit Minister
it s5:30 P.M. - Student fellowship and
"OUR SOULS CATCH UP" supper.
7:30
Weslayan Guild Lecture by 3:30 P.M.-Student Club will be ad-
President GEORGE W. RIGHTMIRE dressed by Prof. Howard MeClusky
Ohio State University
THE F I RST FIRST BAPTIST
PRESBYTERIAN O N LON CHURCH
CH U RCH FOUNDATI East Huron, West of State
Cor. E. Univ. Ave. and Oakland R. Edward Sayles ,Minister
Huron and Division Streets Howard R. Chapman, University
Dr. Bernard Heller, Director Pastor
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, Associate Minister 9:30 A.M.-The Church School. Dr.
w * *Albert J. Logan, Superintendent
9:30 A.M. - Student Classes at the Al:4r . Losuin
Church House.1:5AM-Wrhp
Mr. Sayles will preach. Subject:
10:45 A.M. -Morning Worship. 11:15 A.M - Regular Sunday morn- "MAKING SHIPWRECK OF FAITH"
in-, service at the Women's League
Dr. Anderson will preach on: Chapel' 1t00he-Thmtu't Lop met
"GREEN PASTURES" 12:00 M. - Thestudent group me.
Di Raphael Isaacs will speak on Mr. Chapman at the Guild House.
5:30 P.M. - Social Hour for Young The Evolution of Prayer."
People. 6:00 P.M.-Student meeting at Guild
House.
Sunday evening open house
6:30 P.M.-Young People's Meeting. at the Foundation. Social hour and refreshments
"DISSECTING MISSIONS" by ouroll
Senior Medicsw
BETHLEHEM
ST. PAUL'S EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Ml-souri Synod)t (Evangelical Synod)
Third and West Liberty DO NOT South Fourth Avenue
C. A. Brauer.Pastorh r
Sunday, May 7 NEGLECTTheodore Schmae, Pastor
Sunday, May 7
YOUR 9:00 A.M. - Bible School.
9:30 A.M.--Service in German
1% a * i3dw lip" 10 '0 ~A M-nnnrv[~rh

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