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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1933 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
L n erdity. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until
3:A), 11:30 a. in. Saturday.,
VOL. XLIII SATURDAY, MAY 6, 1933 No. 156
NOTICES
To the Members of the University Council: The next meeting of the
University Council will be on May 8 in Alumni Memorial, Room B, at 4:15
p. m. Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary of Council
Registration for Summer Field Courses in Geology and Geography:
Students .planning to elect the field courses in geology and geography given
during the Summer Session at Mill .Springs Kentucky, should consult the,
instructors in cha:rge of these courses as soon as possible in order to receive
permission to rgister. The instructors will be found in the following of-
G. ,M. Ehhcrs; courses in stratigraphical geology ..........1535 Museum
I. D. Scott, courses in physiography ....................4055 Nat. Sci.
R. B. .Hall, courses in geography...................11 Angell Hall
.Students receiving permission to register should at once begin inocula-
tion against typhoid at the Health Service. This inoculation is given over a
period of two weeks. It should be started immediately to insure maximum'
immunity.
Mimeographed circulars, giving detailed information regarding assemb-
ly of the field parties, personal equipment, supplies for courses, mail and
shipment of baggage, may be obtained from the instructors in charge
of the courses.
Poetry Reading Contest: Contestants must leave a statement of their
eligibility to take part in public activities either with Professor Hollister,
or in the office of the Department of Speech and General Linguistics, Room
3211 Angell Hall, not later than Tuesday noon, May 9. Preliminaries of
this contest will be held Wednesday, May 10, at 4 p. m. in Room 302 Mason
Hall.
ACADEMIC NOTICES
Isychology 33, 35, 37: Make-up thesis No. 3 will be written on Monday,
May 8, at 7:00 p. m. in Room 3126 N.S.
Economics 52: The examination will be held at 2 o'clock on Monday,
May 8, in the following rooms:
205 M.H.-Messrs. Devol and Lamb.
N.S. Aud.-Messrs. Palmer and Hoad
101 Ec.-Mr. Burroughs.
Sociology 132 (Poverty and Dependency) Field Trip: There will be a
trip to the Wayne County Infirmary at Eloise and the Wayne County Train-
ing School at Northville this morning. The bus will leave from in front of
the Union at 8 o'clock. A few visitors who are not members of the class but
who are interested in social problems can be accommodated. The cost will
be about 65 cents if 40 attend.
CONCERT
Graduation Recital: Jeanette Rabinowitz, Pianist, wil give the fol-
lowing graduation recital, Tuesday evening, May 9, at 8:15 o'clock, in the
School of Music Auditorium, to which the general public with the exception
of small children is invited.
Bach: Prelude in A minor (from an English Suite); Scarlatti-Tausig:
Pastorale, Capriccio; Beethoven: Rondo a Capriccio Op. 129; Chopin: Pre-
lude Op. 28, No. 17; Prelude Op. 28, No. 16; Waltz in A flat major, Op. 42;
Debusy: Refiets dans l'eau; Toch: Der Jongleur; Tschaikowsky: June (Bar-
carolle); Rimsky-Korsakoff: The Bumble Bee (Arr. by Rachmaninoff);
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 10.
EVENTS TODAY
International Student Conference to be hel din the Michigan Union.
Conference on World Politics.
Commission meetings at 10:00 a. m. and 1:45 p. in,, in Rooms
319 and 316.
General Session at 7:15 p. in., in Room 316.
Graduate Outing Club: Canoeing trip and'supper, 50 cents. Meet
a"t Angell Hall 2:30.~Those wishing supper only (15 cents) be at Saunders'

sor Norman H. Anring of the Mathe-
matics Department will speak on
"Some Mathematical Curiosities."
Acolytes will meet on Monday, May
8, at 7:30 p. m. in 202 S.W.
Dr. R. Hoekstra will read "A Criti-
que of Some Voluntaristic Theories of
Ethics."
Triangles: I m p o r t a n t business
meeting Sunday, May 7, 5 p. m. att
the Michigan Union.
Philippine-Michigan Club: The club
will hold a picnic at Portage Lake
on Sunday, May 7, in which "lechon"
(roast suckling pig) and other typi-
cal Philippine dishes will be served.
The different groups shall start at
Lane Hall, Sunday morning from
10:00 a. in. to 12:00 noon. Those who
have not made arrangements for
their transportation must please see
either Mr. Vicente Rivera, 214 N. In-
galls, or Mr. Jose Ortis, 1434 Wash-
ington Heights, not later than Sat-'
urday night.
First Methodist Church: At 10:301
a. m. Sunday President Daniel L.
Marsh of Boston University and Dr.
Fisher will speak on "What Place
Has Religion in Education?" At 7:30
p. m. Pres. George W. Rightmire of
Ohio State University will deliver a
Wesleyan Guild Lecture on "Our
Souls Catch Up."
Wesley Hall: Student Guild at 6
p. m. Sunday. Program by the Ann
Arbor Community Orchestra, Fred-
eric Ernest, director. Oriental-Amer-
ican Group at 3:30 p. m. Class at
9:30 a. m. with the Director.
Harris Hall: There will be a tea
at the Hall on Sunday afternoon
from five to seven in honor of the
Reverend and Mrs. Thomas 'L. Har-
ris of Harvard University. In the
evening Mr. Harris will speak to a
small group on "The Use of Confes-
sion in the Church."
St. Andrew's Church: Services of
worship Sunday are: 8:00 a. m. The
Holy Communion, 9:30 a. m. Church'

Economic Sessions Give Proeiam For
Reports To Conference
(Continued from Page 1)Student Group

CLASSIFIED bIRECTORY

trol and that they be given more
power over other banks in their re-j
spective countries, the commissionj
said.
The political session will open at'
10 a. m. today with commission meet-I
ings at the Union. They will con-I
tinue on thr oug the afternoon. The;
commission on the European Crisis
will discuss Titlerism, Facism, and
Communism. That on the League
and the Far-Eastern Crisis will de-
vote its time to a discussion of Soviet!
Russia, China. Japan, and the United4
States and the League.
Both the commission meetings and
the evening se'stions are open to the
public. Reports of the two commis-
sions will be given in the evening. AI
talk by Tarini Sinha, Grad., on "The
Future of the League of Nations"
will close the political sessions of
the conference.
School, 11:00 a. m. Kindergarten,
11:00 a. m. The Holy Communion
and sermon by the Reverend Thomas
L. Harris of Harvard University. '
Lutheran Students: P r o f e s s o r
Howard McCluskey will speak Sun-'
day night at the meeting of the Stu-
dent Club held in the Zion Parish
Hall, corner of Washington Street
and Fifth Avenue. The officers for
the 1933-34 school year will be elect-
ed. Social half-hour at 5:30; supper
at 6:00; and Speaker and Election at
6:30.
Jewish Students: Dr. Raphael
Isaacs of the Simpson Memorial In-
stitute, will speak on "The Evolu-
tion of Prayer" at the regular Sun-
day services for May 7, in the League
Chapel at 11:15 a. m.
Reformed and Christian Reformed
Students: Church services will be
held Sunday at 9:30 a. in. in the
chapel of the Michigan League. Rev.j
J. F. Heemstra of the Reformed
Church will preach.

Is Announced

The program of the Liberal Sti
detnt's Union has been complete
for the year, it was announced ye,
terday by the Rev. H. P. Marley, clo
ing with a picnic on May 28th at th
University Fresh Air Camp at Patte
son Lake. Tomorrow night, Dr. Tar
P. Sinhia will speak on "India's Cor
tribution to the Revolutionary Met
aod."
The following Sunday Miss Maria
McClench, former national presider
of the Business and Profession-
Women's Club will lead a discussio
on "The New Deal for Women," base
cn a special study which she has ju
completed on the effect of the d
pression on women in industry. Th
May 21st meeting is to be a studer
symposium on the topic, "Me and M
Summer." Election of officers for th
coming year will be held at this tim
according to Edgar Backus, '331
president. The Liberal Student's Ur
ion meets at the Unitarian Chure
at 7:30 p. m., Sunday.
It was also announced that on th
first three Sundays of the month, M
Marley will deliver a special series(
talks to students on the placec
young people in the world today. Th
Sunday morning the topic will t
"Youth Movements here and abroad
May 14th the topic will be "Ne
Missionaries for Old" and will ref
to the recent resignation of Pea
Buck from a missionary board,
well as new fields of service whic
students may enter. May 21st th
topic is "Choosing Our Revolution

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NOTICE
HAVE-Your snap shots developed
at Francisco Boyce, 719 N. Univer-
sity. Here fine work is the tradi-
tion. 29c
WANTED
WANTED-MEN'S OLD AND NEW
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Buyers. 34c
TYPING
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TYPING-Notes, Papers. and Grad.
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and the thesis will be developed that
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Gandhi May,
Second

Be Freed
Day Of Fast

SIMLA, India, May 5.-(U)-It is
understood that the Mahatma Gand-
hi is likely to be released from Ye-
roda Jail on the second day of his
projected three weeks' fast in protest
against "untouchability." He has an-
nounced he will begin his new fast
next Monday.
After his release it is said he may
proceed to Ahmedabad to live in the
house of a local class leader.
23 ARRESTED IN RIOT
BILBOA, Spain, May 5.-(P)--A
clash between Socialists and Nation-
alists today resulted in injuries to 23
persons and the arrest of 120.

le
Ir.
of T(( THE GREAT WAR EPIC
of
[is
be#
."
w "Journey'sEn d"
w
er
rl
as MATINEE EVEN ING
e 2:30at8:30
for for
25c 50c
Phone 4121--789 Last Times Today
LABORATORY THEATRE
-I - -

Today Only - George Raft in
"UNDERCOVER MAN"
aSunday and Monday
"THE BIG BROADCAST"

I

I I

THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY
GEsNAL OFFICE'S
2000 SECOND AVENUE
DETROIT, MICHIGAN
May 1, 1933

MAJESTIC
-Starting Today --
.H~
MOIIO'.S ";V.
.r4f~
he I~itrtfljt
t^h
f~ftSt
orh
::, son th, 0iShe

TO THE CUSTOMERS OF
THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY
This is the fifth of a series of lettersR
This s th fift ti 8 villages and
500,000 customers in 29 cities, 58 ilagSan
southeastern corner of9the State of ichigante
About coal. Some of e tal aot r st
on the point that coal is cheap. We paid 32
1929, but not a great deal cheaper.
_- 1000 However, be

addressed to our
130 townships in

the

reduction has been based
cheaper than it was in
cents less per ton for
ecause of fixed cost,

coal in the year 1932 than in W
_ hen service is used long hours.

£,

coal only assumes major impe 'i
r i ~a few hours a day,itsa
To the customer who uses his service o h difference in coal cost
small item. To the domestic customer
_ __ - --e +hn acent and a half a month.

_ P

1

between 1929 and 1932 is less - .--- a .v.,hwcirrent that coal is one or

Seventeen very large customers useS v
tA ~ cntrolling costs, and they pay for their service at a rate that

F

varies with the cost of coal.bwhich cannot be scaled
An electric utilitY has certain big costs w h is bescale
down in proportion to the drop in business. One of these is taxe. We
daw inproorton _,, , c~~r~ niV r not. And, instedo

have to pay taxes whether we se proportionately.
down,ou tabiliup an ou colcs isntdnprpriatl.
eour tax bill is up, and ourts should be limited and avoided so far
as possible because reduction in earning power is fancy vwages,ry bt just
which business is mired. We have ner p ancy wages but just
gh to get good help and keep it. Our labor relations have been and
enouh t ge god p _a - -_[ii n me. We have never had a

f

i

are good, both with Union andci -uii w"
strike. Butwth a third year of decreasing business we could not keep
strike. But witathdyedweep construction hands busy. Like
to a full wage scale, nor could we keepcnstrutin and bs Like
everyone else we had to make reductions, and we went in 1932 to a 5day
everone lse e _W mnt. Weare trying hard to keep good Mel

n.

week in order to spread empJ.yiu . Wr
at work, even if we can only find 3 or 4 days work a week for some of
them , eno ifletting men who were with us in 1930 and 1931 and 1932
them. We are not in
_ _ .. -Fnr n Dtrit nol* in any other community, - and in

d

h welfareneitn

I

go an tn e lc~~ lln epo
this we have the very willin helprof
The next letter in this series

those who are still on, the job.
will appear in this paper next

week.

President

W
Im

wllo , nl ""
see th.is " er
' ituepesne
'I CrlI ema U

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