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April 25, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E MICHIGAN DAILY

has taken a big juicy black eye for the untoward

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doings of a small group inside it. Here at last is
a chance to pin the responsibility for good conduct
where it belongs.
There is no real reason why beer should not
be drunk in fraternities-at meals, for instance-
but proper use of the privilege is a problem that
must be gone into intelligently. That is why The!
Daily advocates the passage of the resolution in
the Council.
The University administration, we believe, will
take no action on the problem in the near future,
in order to give the fraternities this opportunity
to prove their worth as self-governing units.
Presuming that to be the desired end of the;
fraternities, in order to secure it and to protect
the name of the fraternity system as a whole,
e the resolution must be passed.

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Musical Events

Hot Ham and Egg
Sandwich 1 Oc
OPEN ALL NIG1T
BALTIMORE DAIRY LUNCH
AcM from Angell Hall
L dies In ited

m

HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED
Minimum Price 50 cents
Genuine Factory Work-We Make Hats
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St., : Tear State

i

-m .7:waw . we- . -* .-,
Publishedo every morning except Monday during th
University year and Summer Session by the Board ir
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.,
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it o
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local new:
published herein. All rights of republication of specia
~dspatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, ai=
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Posttnater-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier; $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
fces: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214."
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 8(
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.

LUCIE LANDEN RECITALj
Lucie Landen, violinist, assisted by Leone Sax-
ton, accompanist, pupils of Prof. Wassily Bese-
kirsky, of the School of Music, will give the
following graduation recital at 8:15 p. m. Tuesday
in the School of Music auditorium. The general
public with the exception of small children is in-
vited:
Sonata in E major . ....................Handel
Adagio
Allegro
Largo
Allegro
Gavotte en Rondeau . ...................Bach
Variations on a theme of Corelli Tarbini-Kreisler
Symphonie Espagnole................... Lalo
Allegro non troppo
Scherzando
Andante
Allegro
Ballet Music (Rosamonde) ..........Schubert
Dance (La Vida Breve)...............de Falla

SON Coe

ESTABISTED 1843

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EDPTOtIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.............FRANK B. GILBRETH
CT R-EDITOR... .....KAIL SEIFF T
SPRTS EDITOR..........JdIN WW; rjM4
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASISTANT' WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT~ EDITORS: Thomas Connellan John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Hber, Albert Newman.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Donald R.
Bird, Richard Boebel Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G.
Coulter, Harold 'A. Daisher, Caspar S. Early, Waldron
Eldridge, Ted Evans, WillamG t. 'erris, Sidney Fankel,
Thomas Groehn, lRobert D. Guthrie, John C. Healey,.
Robert B. Hewett, George M. Holmes, Joseph L. Karpin-
3AklaMilton Keiner, Matthew Lefkowitz; Manuel Levin,
Irving Levitt, David G. MacDonald, Proctor Mceac y,
Sidney Moyer, Joel P. Newman, John O'Connell, Ken-
neth. Parker; Paul W. Philips ,Gerge quiby Floyd
1abe, William eed, Edwin W. Richardson, Rich-
ard Rome, H. A. Sanders, Robert E. Scott, Adolph
Shapiro, Marshall . Silverman, Wilson L. Trimmer,
George Van Veck, Philip Taylor Van Zile, William
Weeks, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Dorothy Adams, Barbara Bates, Marjorie Beck, Eleanor
R. Blum, Frances Carney, Betty Connor, Ellen Jane
Cooley, argaret Cowie, Adelaide Crowe, llDorothy
Dishman, Gladys ,M. Di'aYes, Jeanette Duff, Dorothy
Gies, --Carol J. Hanan, an E anmer, Florence Harper,
Marie Hei. Margaret' iscock, Eleanor Johnsonr Lois
Jotter, HIllrida Laine, Helen Leison, Kathleen Maclntyre,
Josephine McLean, Anna Miller, Mary Morgan; Marjorie
Morrison, Marie Murphy, Mary M. O'Neill, Margaret D.
eihlan. Jane Schneider, Barbara Sherburne, Mary E
, nipson, Ruth Sonnastine, Margaret Spencer, Miriam
P. Stark, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ...............BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER...............HARRY R. BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......Donna C. Becker
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising,.W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ce, Noel Turner; Accounts, BernardE. Schnake; Cr-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read. Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward. Meigs W. Bartmess, William B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimny, Billie rifiths, Catherine Mcfenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McCob, Meria Abbot,Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1933
Beer East
Of 'Division
C OULD BEER sold freely east of
Division Street result in an over-
consumption of the frothy stuff by college stu-
dents? such a question can more easily be an-
swered if put this way: Would beer sd freely
only west of Division Street prevent college stu-
dents from over-consumption?
Here is the answer:
College students, before Prohibition, were (ac- I
cording to accepted reports) confirmed beer
drinkers. So was most of the male population of
America. Beer was rather delightful,
College students, during prohibition, still have
consumed a fairly godo-sized quantity of beer. So
has most of the male population of America. Beer
is still rather delightful.
The rest of America drank rather an unusual
quantity of beer on April 7, when the 3.2 brew be-
came generally legal. So did the college students.
On April 8, the consumption had fallen off con-
siderably from the previous day; April 7 was a
celebration. When the novelty wore off, America
settled down to temperate beer drinking, which
was to be expected.
It is a bit difficult to deny that no one becomes
drunk on a few glasses of beer. Those who drink
for intoxication will confine themselves to harder
liquors which are still illegal and still accessible.
If a college student wants beer, he will cross
Division Street. If he is too lazy to cross Division
Street, and still wants to drink, he will get in
touch with his . bootlegger, who will deliver him
hard liquor-which is defeating the purpose of
the Division Street ruling.
Therefore, the ruling will not .only have no dele-
terious effect on the college -student's . beer con-
sumption, but will work in precisely the opposite
direction.

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous comimunications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however,be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
SECOND INSTALLMENT ON
SFORZA AND POLAND
(Continued From Sunday's Daily)f
Before we take up the matter of what Mr.
Prockin calls "sporadic cases" of sabotage (191
cases in the period July-November, 1931), we
must say a word or two about the political
parties existing among the Ukrainians. Although
a number of minor parties, such as the Sel-Rob,
,exists, by. far the strongest party is the U. N. D. O.
In 1926 three tendencies were revealed within this
party: the Right-with an orientation toward Po-
land; the Center-standing for a policy of Self-
Reliance; and the Left-with an orientation to-
ward Russia. The organization which has been
causing the.most trouble for Poland is the illegal
U. W. O., which has its headquarters in Berlin
and represents only a very small portion of the
Ukrainian masses. It was this organization which
was behind the acts of terrorism that took place
in 1930-31 and caused the sending of Polish troops
to Eastern Malopolska. Definite evidence of the
complicity of the U. W. O. is found in an article
which appeared in the Ukrainan periodical "Uk-
raina" of Chicago on October 17, 1930. The article
is entitled "The Part Action of the U. W. O."
and is accompanied by an editorial note to the
effect that it came from the inner circles of the
U. W. 0.:
"For the second time the U. W. O. has re-
sorted to so-called part action. The object
of this part action is to promote, by organized
activities, disquiet in the country and panic
among the Polish population, to break the
Polish spirit of expansion, to breed distrust
of the Government as their protector against
Ukrainian attacks, now or in the future. It
is to encourage a state of mnid extremely
hostile to the Polish State and nation among,
the Ukrainian masses. Finaly, its object is to
foster uncertainty and anarchy so as to deep-
en the impression abroad that the frontiersI
of Poland are not permanent, that the Polish
State is not consolidated, and that the feel-
ings of the Ukrainian population are mani-
festly anti-Polish."
In view of these facts, can the Polish govern-
ment be censured for not tolerating anarchy
within its borders?
To the questions Mr. Prockin raises concerning
Marshal Pilsudski all we can do is ask, "Had he?"
Mr. Prockin seems to overlook the fact that no
Russian banks existed in Poland nor did the
Russian nobility build palaces there. (We cannot
refrain from pointing out here the peculiar meta-
morphosis Pilsudski appears to have undergone
since the time he was called a "comic opera
figure" by Count Sforza. Count Sforza's defender
has now made Pilsudski a bank robber and in-1
cendiary.)
-Before concluding, we must discuss briefly at
least the possibility of autonomy for the Ukrain-
ians. In the first place, the Ukrainians are not
to be found only in Poland. Numbers of them
-are in Czechoslovakia and Roumania, but the
main body, some 25,000,000, are in Russia, from
where, as we pointe4 out in our last letter,
thousands are escaping into Poland. In the sec-
ond place, those that are in Poland are not to
be found in any one compact group. Poland is
divided into 280 districts. The latest census re-
vealed that there are only:
"Two. stretches of territory with mixed Po-
lish-Ukrainian population and Ukrainian ma-
jority, one to the north, and the other to the
south of the Polish salient of Lwow-Podolia
and unconnected with each other-35 dis-
tricts, and
"Four patches of compactly Ukrainian ter-
ritory - eight districts." (Polish and Non-Po-
lish Populations of Poland published by In-
stitute for the Study of Minority Problems).
Furthermore, it is only a small group of Uk-
rainians, that desires autonomy. The feeling of
other Ukrainians is excellently expresed in the
speech Deputy Peter Pewnyj, a Ukrainian of the
voievodship of Volhynia, delivered to the Seym on

February 5, 1931:
"Experience has clearly .shown that the policy
of indiscriminate opposition to all things Polish,
adopted some time ago by various political groups
among the Ukrainians, is a policy which produces
no good results. It did no more than destroy
good feeling between Poles and Ukrainians and
postpone an honest solution of the Ukrainian
problem in Poland.
The Ukrainian Group in the Government Bloc
consisting of six deputies and two senators elected
from Volhynia, has the honor to declare that,
remaining loyal to the ideals of the Ukrainian
nation, for which her best sons have fought in
the past and are fighting now., and desiring at
the same time to solve by peaceful means the
Ukrainian problem in Poland, it .stands firmly by,
a policy of full loyalty to the Polish State and
Constitution."
Such is the Polish-Ukrainian situation. We
_ _....TT . T ..,..ic:<. .3. , L.. . .. .. ..-.17: . >.7 ..:. ,

Srierptific
Laboratory Supplie -s

MICHIGAN

200-202 E. LIBERTY ST.

DAILY

HUNTER JOHNSON-
The day of the esoteric, pseudo-European musi-
cian is past. Breadth of outline is replacing the
perfection of parts; the stark vitality of an ener-
1 getic country of immense size has taken the place
of the sterile, mechanical rhythms of several years
ago. A new school of composers has been develop-
ed, with a trend of thought that is intensely and
uniquely American. Typical of the movement is
Roy Harris who recently lectured in Ann Arbor
a pioneer who writes in a rugged, "homespun"r
style. Another example of this school is Hunter
Johnson, recent winner of the Prix de Rome.
Young, vigorous, intensely interested in his work,
Mr. Johnson is essentially American-and proud
of it. The predominating influence in his music,
aside from a touch of Stravinsky in his rhythms
and an atonal flavor from Central Europe in some
earlier works, is of this country. His symphony,
which Dr. Hanson of Eastmann has called a work
of tremendous and vital rhythms, is as a whole,
an abstraction, an idealization of our jazz spirit,
and, moreover, many of the slower themes are
derived from the folk music of the Anglo-Saxon
race. In the matter of lyrical development, Mr.
Johnson has been compared to Harris, with the
additional difference that where Roy Harris writes
in bald, large outlines, Johnson's music is more
smoothly melodic and often even polymelodic.
The symphony is written in four continuous
movements, beginning with a slow introductory
theme that underlies the whole work and out of
which it grows with an eloquent inevitability
that is unusual in a great deal of contemporary
music. Its extreme rhythmic irregularities are ex-
pressive of our fast going, chaotic age. Contrary
to the usual convention, the first movement has
no recapitulation but goes on to the statement
and development of new materials-and it is not
until the fourth movement that the main theme
recurrs in an allegro tempo-a form which seems
to be unique to this composer and was called by I
one of the judges, "As nearly perfect as anyone
could ask for."
Besides this work which was written over a
year, Mr. Johnson has written A piano sonata
which attempts to re-establish a contact with the
classical composers in its closely integrated and
concise form but transcends their limitations with
its organicaly evolved themes. He has also written
a sextet for strings, and a fugal piece for piano
and wind instruments which is contrapuntally
dissonant and very rhythmic, and other shorter
works. Characteristic of his work is the definite
melodic contour standing out above the subsidiary
elements and their decided rhythmic quality.
-Kathleen Murphy
The lowest temperature recorded here during
the last decade was on Feb. 19, 1929. The reading
was 19.5 degrees below zero.
STARS
"Ever smoke 'whttle' tobacco?" asks an ad. Not
yet, but some half whittle probably try to sell us
some one of these days.
BETA, D. U., Z. B. T.,
B & B WIN FIRST
BASEBALL TILTS
-Headline
An Tel & Tel O. K. too.
Democrats today pointed fingers of scorn at
Republicans, and Republicans glared haughtily
at Democrats. Each party awarded the other full
blame for preventing final passage of the admin-
istration beer bill before Monday night. Weary
citizens seemed to believe there was discredit
enough for both.-News Item.
And it's the first time in history that all three
have been right.
FLASHIN' THE NEWS
(From the Indiana Daily Student)
(By Bill Crabb)
MacDonald will arrive tody,
Hoosiers primed for Normal-fray:
Governor speaks at banquet here,
A. W. S. mass meeting near.

Mrs. Nye receives award,
McNutt gets key from Union Board.
Anything for a laugh, hey Bill?
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CLASSIFIEDS

The Farmers and Mechanics Bank

READ

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More money Is,
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Wise Merchants are pre-
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ing Released!

It

Drinking In
Fraternities. ..

A RESOLUTION recommending in-
dividual action by fraternities on
the beer question, proposed by a joint committee
of alumni and students, is now up before the In-
terfraternity Council. It is a resolution that should
be passed.
Although the resolution advises the several fra-
ternities to pass rulings against the consumption
of beer in the house, it should not be construed
as a prohibitionary measure. If the Council passes

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The Michigan Daily offers
the ns of reach
ing Ann Arhor's Better

"Dorothea Wieck Is First of Parade of Personal-
ities to Coast," says a headline. Pooh-that's
nothing; the boys up in Lansing have been coast-
ino- for months.

Buying Public.

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