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April 06, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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[ICHIGAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
.Mmber of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer ry carrier, $1.00; by mail,
4.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by

Leelanau Douglas D. Tibbits (Rep.)
Lenawee James W. Helme (Rep.)
Livingston T. Henry Howlett (Dem.)
Lace Henry E. Perry (Rep.)
Mackinac (Vacancy to be filled by election
April 3)
VacombPaul A. Hupert (Dem.)
Vanistee Chester P. Emunson (Dem.)
Iarquette John P. Collins (Rep.)
Mason Hans O. Clines (Dem.)
Mecosta Lawrence O'Neil (Dem.)
Menominee Speaker Martin R. Bradley (Dem.)
-Midland Don Sias (Rep.)
Missaukee Frank C. Priest (Rep.)
Monroe -Speaker protein Tracey South-
E worth (Dem.)
Montcalm *Leslie T. Barber (Dem.)
Montmorency William Green (Rep.)
Muskegon John Dykstra (Rep.)
T.1'.Thomas Thatcher (Dem.)
Newaygo Don Vander Werp (Rep.)
Oakland Melvin H. Lee (Rep.)
Fred E. Watkins (Dem.)
Occana Don Vander Worp (Rep.)
3gemaw Fred Holbeck (Rep.)
Dutonagon William C. Birk (Rep.)
Jsceola Miles M. Callaghan (Rep.)
Oscoda William Green (Rep.)
Jtsego Ernest C. Faircloth (Dem.)
Ottawa Edward Brouwer (Rep.)
Presque Isle William Green (Rep.)
Roscommon William Green (Rep.)
Saginaw *George J. Green (Dem.)
Frank J. Berka (Dem.)
William B. Hackett (Dem.)
Sanilac John W. Goodwine (Rep.)
Schooleraft Henry E. Perry (Rep.)
Shiawassee Ephrln Judison (Dem.)
St. Clair *Duncan J. MeColl (Rep.)
:George C. Watson (Rep.)
St. Joseph Ernest C. Engle (Dem.)
Tuscola D. Knox Hanna (Rep.)
Van Buren *'Earl L. Burharns (Rep,)
asitonaw* **Philip C. Pack (Rep.)
vayne Martin W. Baginski (Dem.)
Joseph S. Brzostowski (Demn.)
Carl W. Bischoff (Dem.)
William Buckley (Dem.)
John P. Connors (Delp.)
*",Wm. L. Donnelly (Dem.)
Chester B. Fitzgerald (Dem.)
Len A. Jurkiewicz (Dem.)
Bert S. Kennedy (Demn.)
Herman Kramer (Dem.)
John B. Murphy (Dem.)
Ernest C. Nagel (Dem.)
J. C. Roosevelt (Dem.)
Louis J. Schneider (Dem.)
Geo. A. Schroeder (Dem.)
Edw. J. Walsh (Dem.)
Frank J. Calvert (Rep.)
M. J. Grajewski, Jr. (Dem.)
!John C. McInerney (Dem.)
Dr. Edward F. Fisher (Rep.)
Wexford H. Earl McNitt (Rep.)
indicates University of Michigan Alumnus.
indicates member of University committee.
indicates alumnus who is meiber of University
committee.
ADDRESS YOUR REPRESENTATIVE AS FOLLOWS:
Hon. John Jones,
House of Representatives,
Lansing, Mich.

development of new crimes. The real tragedy of
these laws is that those who made them wor-
shiped false gods. They sought to achieve quickly,
through the force of government, ends which are
attainable only by education, persuasion, general
conviction and voluntary agreement."
Walter Lippmann.
"After a careful study of the operation of pro-
hibition in America, I have come to the conclu-
sion that one of the best things that the govern-
ment could do would be to 'prohibit everything."
G. K. Chesterton.
"The only man that gets anything out of cap-
italism is a crook and he gets to be a millionaire
in short order."
John Dos Passos
"The dolorous robe and funny hat are somehow
associated with the labeling of learning."
Ann Vickers
-M. Levi.

* - , 0
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Town Points
By FRANCIS WAGNER

Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Annm Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; .612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETII
CITY EDITOR......................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR................. JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renlihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
S#ORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fret A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G.
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Edwin W. Richardson,
George VailVleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, Eleanor B. BlumEllen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorotfhy Dishman,
Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSNESS STAFF'
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER................BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER......................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertis ing, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard . Schuacke; Cir-
clation, Gibert E. Bursky; Pubiletton . Robert E+
Finn,
ASSISTANTS: Joh Belh mIy Cordon Bo (,1n Alien Clevc-
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuul, u.-. i, Fred Rogers ,
Lester Skinner, Joseph sudow. Iobert Ward.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane h.TtBouih Chapman, Doris
Gimny. Billy Griitlh , Catwrlnc z ln ry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb.
THURSDAY, APRI f ' 1. 33

When Charles Hemans and Frank Cook were
elected to the Board of Regents in the election
yesterday it Was the first time since the Civil War
that any Democrats were elected to that body.
Two Democrats served on the board by appoint-
ment. They were the present governor, William A.
Comstock, appointed by Governor Ferris, and Re-
gent Shields, appointed by Governor Comstock.
Felch Park on Twelfth Street was Ann Arbor's
original cemetery. Bodies were removed to Forest
Hill cemetery.
Northfield township, north of the city, was first
settled by Irish. The Irish proved poor farmers
and were succeeded by a crop of Germans who
still hold the land today.
The present University campus served as a
cow pasture in the early days. In fact, for= a
time it served the dual purpose of campus and
cow pasture.
In the old days, there were two train stops be-
tween Ann Arbor and Dexter. They were Delhi
Hills and Fosters' Station. Today, few trains stop
at Dexter. and some do not stop in Ann Arbor.
The D.U.R. (Detroit United Railway), electric
interurban line, before its demise, passed through
Ann Arbor on its way from Detroit to Jackson
and Chicago. A car barr. and repair station
was maintained at Ypsilanti.

Students: Pro esi The
PrOpoSed Bidg L .

. 0

A PETITION protesting the pro-
posed cut in the University mill
tax appropriation has been signed by more than
3,000 students, endorsed by The Daily, The Na-
tional Student League, Michigamua, and Sphinx,
and has been presented to Gov. William A. Coin-
stock,
This petition will have its effect, without
doubt. Whether it can, per se, accomplish the
task of dissuading the State's economy-eyed leg-
islature from enacting the proposed cut is an-
other matter.
But one more method of attack is open to
the University: 'Students from this state can
protest personally, by telegram, and by mail,
the proposed slash.
When you, a student, go home for Spring Va-
cation, you can help your University by lodging
a strong protest with your Representative. It is
an old method of making a kick, but a good
one.
Many of your parents are influential in politi-
cal circles. Have them wire or write your Repre-
sentative or see him in person. Tell your parents
what the cut would mean-obliterated depart-
ments, higher tuition, a dismembered faculty.
Remind them that your department of major
interest may be entirely removed from the cur-
riculum.
Students from this state who are of voting
age and their parents form no little part of the
constituency that gives the Representatives
named below their jobs. You and your p5arents
can, and should, tell those who would wield the
axe over your University what a ruinous pro-
gram they are contemplating.
When you go home don't leave it to someoner
else-ACT YOURSELF.
(Michigan's Representatives are here listed
for your benefit).
MICHIGAN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
County Member's Names
Alcona Duncan A. Cameron (Dem.)
Alger Henry E. Perry (Rep.)
Allegan Arthur U. Odell (Rep.)
Alpena Duncan A Cameron (Dem .)
Antrim Frank C. Priest (Rep.)
Arenac Fred C. Holbeck (Rep.)
Barage. William C. Birk (Rep.)
Barry Charles P. Parker (Dep.)
Bay Joseph V. Coumans (Dema.)
Harold C. Bellows (Dem.)
Benzie H. Earl McNitt (Rep.)
Berrien F. Dean Morley (Dem..)
Harvey H. Jarvis (Dem.)
Branch *Edwin G. Babcock (Den.)
Calhoun Vern Vorhees (Dem.)
**James G. Frey (Rep.)
Cass Charles M. Myers (Dem,.)
Charlevoix Douglas D. Tibbets (Rep.)
Cheboygan Erne'st E. Faircelosh e.
Chippewa Henry A. Osborn RI'p3.)
Clare ea)
Clinton S
()Delta Wi;llam Green Rep.)
DickinsonEmm 1a3 oleo-
E~to Jhnl.Si':t''_ hn.
C1enes(e ?\; i .)
Oraud Traverse WI~iA ~iiRen
l~uhton ,flC .J.wS
Huron 1'he .Ma nl ~ Rc.)

- ..
Screen Reflections
Four stars rneans extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good: one star just another picture;
no Stas keep away from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"THEY HAD TO GET MARRIED"
I BJLSQUE OF PLAYS
ABOUT MARRIAGE TROUBLES
Molly.....................Zasu Pitts
Sam ................. Slim Summerville
Hiary 'Hume ............ Roland Young
Vague Zasu Pitts and aimless Slim Summer-
Ville sort of wander unconsciously through this
picture getting themselves into all sorts of ridic-
ulous situations. With the aid of a new device
called "talking through your hat" which is sus-
piciously like an aside, they have marital troubles.
As housemaid and butler in a large mansion
they inherit the fortune of the owner because he
knows that none of his relatives, including Roland
Young, have any of the better qualities. Having
been nominally in love for 10 years they "have
to get married" and the fun commences as they
try to accustom themselves to married life and
the social position that they are expected to main-
tain.
Roland Young is, as usual, perfect in his part
as the lover of the wife of a big game hunter.
Why he never is given a starring vehicle of
his own is a mystery.
This show is a burlesque of all of the marital
discord pictures that you have ever seen.
-B. S.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
PADEREWSKI IS LOST
To The Editor:
Recently a caricature of Paderewski, on ex-
hibition at the Hut, was misappropriated by some
lover of the arts .
For personal reasons it is very important to
the artist that the picture be returned. Will the
person concerned kindly surrender the picture
to Quarry's Drug Store, S. State and N. Uni-
versity, where it will be reclaimed without em-
barrassment to the present holder.
The University fosters an appreciation of the
arts. Does it encourage a recognition of the
rights of others as well?
-The Artist.
SEND PETITIONS TO YOUR
STATE LEGISLATOR
To The Editor:
Save the University.
The initiative shown by the student body in
signing petitions registering their protest to the
50 per cent budget slash is to be highly com-
mended. Undoubtedly there are many people in
the state who share their views. However, the
American electorate is often slow in taking the
initiative on matters which do not immediately
concern them. For this reason the students from
this state who are going home Spring Vacation
may help even more by circulating similar peti-
tions in their home town. Alumni and others who
appreciate the real function of this University will
,e eager to lend their support. If every state
e~nator and representative received such peti-
tions signed by his own constituents he might do a
little thinking before resorting to drastic meas-
ures, This should be done immediately so that
the petitions are in the hands of the legislators
by April 10.
-Paul H. Junge, Grad.

Another aid to business
.a Telet ewriter "Central
Working out new ways to serve the communica-
tion needs of the public is an objective always in the
minds of Bell System men. The new Teletypewriter
Exchange Service-typing by wire-is an example.
For some years Private Wire Teletypewriter Ser-
vice has speeded communication between separated
units of many large organizations. Telephone men-
anxious to make this service more widely useful-
have now established Teletypewriter central offices,
through which any subscriber to the service may be
connected directly with any other subscriber. Both
can type back and forth - their messages being re-
produced simultaneously at each point.
This new service provides fast, dependable com-
munication and does for the written word what tele-
phone service does for the spoken word. It is one
more Bell System contribution to business efficiency.
BELL SYSTEM

your advertisig

the Cost

is surpris-

ngly low.

S"iTARS

If You Can u, a tele-
phone ... you can
insert a classified
[ad in The Mich i oui
Daily .T .jct ;tcall
Al the Ad-Taker at
2-121 a4 .nl he'

&STRIPES

ell41

By Karl Seifer
Dundee, Scotland, has 16,250 more women
voters than men, which explains in part why
Scotchmen traditionally wear kilts..,

you arrange

TA K E A TR I P
...T O NI GH T

H O ME IBY TELEP h ONF
AT HALF-PAST EIGHT1

F-

'. --

i

CLASSIFIED AD: Mr. Butcher,
looking for a hot spot in Royal Oak,
Do you have to be a butcher?

if you are
call me .

NICKEL BEER
IS DOUBTFUL
-Headline
Not half as doubtful as some we've paid two
bits for.
There is one bill before the Legislature which,
if passed, is going to make it tough for ice cream
dealers. It stipulates that no food product shall
be sold without being washed cr pared before
eating.
SLY WINK DEPT.
"This fight has been going on for more than
40 years and it isn't going to end now."
-Rev. R. N. Holsaple, of the Anti-Saloon
League.
* * *
CLASSIFIED AD: Experienced woman wants
washing.
Can't be awfully experienced.
* * *
UNCLE ENOCH'S CORNER
"Please tell me what is wrong with my daugh-
ter. She is 11 years old and in the fourth grade.
It seems as if she can not do her school work.
Are there schools for children like my daughter?"
-Letter to Parental Advice Column.
Nothing to worry about, lady; your daughter is
just a little too young for Ann Arbor yet.
* * *
And then there is the girl who was so dumb she
thought the story of the three bears originated
in a nudist colony.
* * *
Chilean workers in the nitrate fields are betting
on who can hold a lighted stick of dynamite long-
est. The record holder, we understand, has given
up the sport.
* * *
A BLACK LOOK FOR LANSING
Of course right now it doesn't look as if
we were going to have to .worry about this
very much, because chances are the Legisla-
ture won't ever pass a beer bill, but if they do
it looks like a toss-up that we'll have beer by
Christmas 1934.
And here's why. If the bill doesn't pass
two-thirds of both houses, it can't be con-
sidered an emergency bill and will have to
wait 90 days before it goes into effect. Also,
it will be open to referendum by the dries. So
all the dries have to do is get five per cent
of the voters to sign a petition for referen-
dum, which they can do easy enough in 90
days.

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Is Virginity
Coming Back?
Gargoyle considers both the gen-
eral and local aspects of this
puzzling problem in presenting
its solution to the campus. Be-
sides a greater number of draw-
ings and cartoons the current
issue raises the question, by way
of a reprint from the New York
Herald Tribune Roto, of "When
is a cow not a cow? Do you
know the answer?

Campus Sale--Today Onl
Featuring:
Mr. Fowkes' Yacht.
Hell's Bells,
The Vice in the Old Village Choir.

TINGS WORTH MEDITATING;
LAWS AND PROHIBITION

Your Own Chap Record.
Preposterous People No. 5

I

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