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March 19, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
rnivert year and Summer Session by the Board in
'ntrol o Student Publications.
Mamber of the Western Conference Editorial Assoia-
lo and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMER OF TlE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
r republication< of all news dispatches credited to it or
tf otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
ublished herein. All rights of republication of special
ispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
cond class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
hird Assistant Postmaster-General
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; bymail,
.5. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
Lall, $4.5.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
nn Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214
Representatives:-College ublcations Representatives,
c., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New YorC City: 80
ylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
hicag.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
ANAGINO EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETH
TYl EDITOR.... ........ ....KARL SEFFERT
eORTS EDITOR .... . JOHN W. THOMAS
OMEN'S EDITO R M... A.R.. MARGARET O'BRIEN
SSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
GHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw
Glenn °R. Winters.
ORTS ASSISTANTS: 'L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
@PORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
lewett, George M. Holmes,' Edwin W. Richardson,
George Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple. Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck. Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Hlen Levi-
on, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
w'estern
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
SINESS MANAGER... !.........BYRON C. VEDDER
EDIT MANAGER....... ......ARRY BEGLE
OMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......DONNA BECKER
PARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp-
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ic, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacko; Cir-
'ulatio, Gilbert E, Bursey Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
SISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
lnd, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred ertrick,
oseph fHume, Alien Knuus, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
ester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Aigier, Jane Bassett, Beuilah Chapman, Doris
Ilnmy, Billy Grifiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
Cried, Virginia McComb.
SUNDAY, MARCH 19, 1933
Miotional Stress
.s An Influence On Grades
A N INTERESTING feature of the
Academy of Science, Arts and Let-'
s Meeing from the students' point of view was
aper by Wendall Vreeland of the Detroit Board
Education entitled "The Influence of Emotion
Motor Activity."
Mr. Vreeland pointed out that it is well-known
at under certain favorable circumstances ex-
lent students may make very poor showings
examinations, and that it is unjust to credit1
ch a showing entirely to the student's knowl-
ge of the subject. His experiment dealt with
, specific problem of how emotional stresst
uses fluctuations of this nature in the writing
examinations, and the charts he presented
4icate clearly that the subject is well worthy oft
ether study.t
In large classes and in all-lecture courses it is
possible to evaluate the student's grasp of the
bject in the classroom, and the teacher is forced
place a practically 100 per cent reliance on
e bluebook in determining the grade. If the stu-..
nt's curve of learning' were a smooth curve such 1
basis would be perfectly justifiable, but Mr.
eeland's curves were a succession of "humps"
d "hollows," and it is too often the case that
e bluebook hits the hollow instead of the hump.
r example, how many students feel above par
any respect at 8 a. m. Monday?'
[t is not easy to find a solution to the prob-
n. If a correction factor might be figured out'
rough which a proper evaluation could be
tained, as the experiment hinted, it would be
e, but each case would require a different cor-
tion factor.
At any rate the question merits further con-.
leration, and we hope something can be done1
out it.

discussion, the teacher naturally believes that the
class is sincere in its questions and consequently
tries to answer all of them to the best of his
ability. It is in this type of class that many would
like to take the "intelligent questioner" aside and
quietly break his neck.
Looking Backward
The Unsung Heroes..
L OOKING BACK . . . stock market
crash, unemployment, bankruptcy,
strikes, frozen assets, bank holidays, earthquake,
tornado . . . history making events happening
in rapid succession.
But we have not changed fundamentally. We
are still a big world made up of little people.
For the moment, of necessity, we have gone world
conscious. We have forgotten the little people.
How about-
The kind hearted student who was expelled
from college because he shifted the position of
his examination paper so that his neighbor could
read it.
The English instructor who spent his days an-
swering "intelligent" questions and his nights
wading through second rate rhetoric.
The grind who coached the athlete before final
examinations.
The fellow who took the long way around and
didn't walk on the grass.
The restaurant owners who gave credit.
The girl who was willing to go to the library
on her date.'
Looking ahead-open banks, rising stock mar-
ket, more employment, spring. (
M usical Eve!,ntsno+.Pd
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO
PRESENTS TWO MODERN WORKS
The School of Music trio will present the fol-
lowing program of unusual modern works at Hill
Auditorium this afternoon. This organization,
which is made up of Prof. Wassily Besekirsky,
violinist, Prof. Hans Pick, 'cellist, and Prof. Jo-
seph Brinkman, pianist, needs no introduction to
Ann Arbor audiences.
Trio for Violin, Violincello and Piano . . . .Pizzetti
Mosso e arioso-Vivace
Largo
Rapsodia di Settembre
Trio in E flat Major ... . ............ Andreae
Allegro moderato
Molto adagio
Presto
Editorial Comment

_.

Nearly every move taken during the past three
weeks by the President and the national and state
governments has been strangely congruent to
state and local action taken in 1907 in an attempt
to allay the financial fears of the people. The
single exception concerns the recent restriction
of gold exportation, a ban not exercised in 1907.
In October, 1907, a panic seized New York City.
Bankers there met the demand of hoarders for
money by issuing negotiable certificates in differ-
ent forms, and ultimately, by limiting with-
drawals. The effect of the panic on western banks,
however, was more distinct, and their lack of a
supply of currency to meet withdrawals led to the
legal declaration of bank holidays in four states,
Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and California. The
holidays, as declared, were for periods of one to
six days, and in each case were renewed at their
expiration. Since the federal government at that
time had taken no hand in regulation, the banks
framed their own versions of the holidays and in
nearly every case permitted withdrawals for
household expenditures. A depositor who wished
to take limited funds from a bank during the pe-
riod stated that the money was for such a pur-
pose, and upon identification he was given his
money.
Scrip money in the form of vouchers was issued
by eastern banks in 1907 to supply depositors with
liquid funds. Manufacturers and large employers
issued their own forms of scrip. Clearing house
certificates, discussed as a substitute for currency
during the past two weeks, were used then in
eastern sections only for loan transactions be-
tween banks, but were widely circulated as a form
of currency in towns and cities in Georgia, South
Carolina, Iowa, Pensylvania, Missouri, Tennessee,
California, Alabama, Oregon, and Utah. Three
of these, Utah, Oregon and California are among
states which have set up extensive machinery for
issuance of scrip money during the recent holiday.
Business men of 1907 who were faced with pay-
rolls and other necessary expenditures, and whose
funds were tied up by withdrawal limitations,
soon resorted to the practice of selling certified
checks on the limiting banks at a discount, for
currency or gold. This practice brought much
hoarded money into circulation, brought American
gold from foreign countries, but had the addi-
tional effect of causing heavy withdrawals from
banks still wide open, and so ultimately brought
about limitations in all banks. The check dis-
counts paid ranged from one to four per cent.
The ultimate effect of the bank holidays and
temporary money system of 1907 was to allay the
panic spirit of the people. When the situation had
quieted down and banking business was resumed,
there was no revival of the mania for hoarding.
Resumption of full payments to depositors came
within a few weeks of the beginning of the holi-
days, and within four months the temporary
money had been retired from circulation.
Today's parallel to the recovery of 1907 cannot
yet be cited as history. Supplementary factors
for recovery, however, including the substantial
background of the Federal Reserve System, the
prohibition of gold exports, and a systematic gov-
ernment-supervision plan for recovery and econ-
omy, should serve only to accelerate a return to
normalcy. A sixteen-cylinder '33 model Recovery
filled with first-grade Confidence gasoline can
reach Prosperity Corner much quicker than its
two-cylinder predecessor.
When they get down to business the Germans
can put up as hectic a political campaign as a
traveler can see in any corner of the World.
-Detroit Free Press

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You'll Be Pleased With the
Annotincement in The Mich-
igon Doily for an innovation
beginning-
March 27th

N

Where?

At Slater's Two Bookstores!

HUNDREDS OF

STARTLING BARGAINS.
People have actually- been astonished at the unusual
values we have created in our GIGANTIC STOCK SAC-
RIIFICE SALE. An $80,000.00 stock of QUALITY mer-
chandise issla shed in price that your dollar is doubled in
value.
Prices of all comrnmodities will ineyitably and sooin se -
Avail yourself of the opportunities presented in this Sale,
SALE PRICES ALL THIS WEEK
" AT BOTH ENDS OF THE CAMPUS

LET'S CLEAR THE
POLITICAL ATMOSPHERE
There is a rule in evolution, in architecture, in
brewing beer, that everything must have an ex-
cuse for its existence. The sandburr has burrs to
spread its seeds broadcast, the rabbit eyes set at
the side of its head so that it may see back-
wards when it is running. On the surface, excuses
for living are not always apparent. We believe
that whenever possible the reasons for existence
should always be made known, and if no explan-
ation is forthcoming it is often possible to elim-
inate much useless material, deadwood.
Of such a breed are campus politicians. Just
what good are these creatures scurrying around
the campus? Do they justify their own existence?
We would like to know. If elected to office will
these men accompilsh any definite good, or are
they just publicity seekers for themselves and
their fraternities? Can they justify their running
for office? Can they offer any definite program
for the benefit of campus institutions which,
goodness knows, certainly need benefiting?
A singular phenomenon takes place every se-
mester on the Wisconsin campus. Men and women
run for office and are elected. Why? We suggest
a method of finding out.
The Men's Union board should call the Men's
assembly to hear the candidates give their plat-
forms and reasons for running. The public should
be permitted to attend. The custom of getting
votes because a person is well known is outworn.
its only benefit is to make the person better
known. Does any positive good come out of this
process? We' want to know, and we are sure that
the rest of the campus would also be interested
to find out. Therefore we publicly ask the Men's
Union board to call the Men's assembly and the
candidates, permit attendance of the public, and
let the university find out what it is all about.
-Daily Cardinal
FUEL FOR A BATTLE
ON FOOTBALL'S DANGERS
Ammunition for opponents of athletics was'
furnished this week in the death of Monte Lee
Munn, member of a famous University of Ne.-
braska athletic family. After a long career in foot-
ball and wrestling, he died of a sudden heart
attack at the age of 32.
So those who have long maintained that "ath-
letic heart" is an active peril for American college
men can point to the case and say "I told you
so."
Then their adversaries, supporters of athletics,
will dig out their frequently-used books of sta-
tistics, and show that such-and-such number of
athletes lived so many years longer than an
equal number of non-competitors.
Each side will call upon expert testimony and
will find hundreds of physicians ready to support
its view. No one will make much of an investi-
gation, and the public will be generally apathetic
to the whole affair.
Then the controversy will subside, without a
decision, to await the next report from Columbia
university of vital statistics on university students,
or the next death before 40 of a man who played
football in college.
-Daily Iow i n

State Street

BOOKSTORES
East University Avenue

I

t-~
STR

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STiRIPES

e Huey Longs
The Classroom.

F ILIBUSTERING is not confined to
the Senate and Huey Long as any
student who has been forced to listen to the
bright boy who asks "intelligent" questions in
class can testify. You all know him, you all hate
him, this worthy who is so anxious to impress his
intelligence on the instructor that he absolutely
halts class discussion for half an hour so that he
can discuss some abstruse and totally irrelevant
point with the professor.
A slight variant of this pest is the one who
thinks it is smart and funny to try to get the
man conducting the class so tangled up that he
must make lengthy explanations to point out
the fallacy in the student's reasoning. While the
instructor is attempting in all good faith to set
members of the class right on a point on which
they seem to have gone astray, this chap is chuck-
ling because he has taken tap a valuable part of
the class time which might otherwise be used
profitably.
This type of filibustering is particularly perni-
cious in the course in which most of the time is
devoted to lectures and laboratory periods, with
only one or two quiz sections a week in which
puzzles can be solved by the professor. And yet
it is in this sort of course that the intelliaent

,----y Karl Seiffert
DARK THREAT DEPARTMENT
"Beer is, and always has been, the most bru-
talizing of all drinks. It induces and perpetuates
the alcoholic habit and leads to causes of death
which have been cut in two under prohibition.
-"If women take the beer habit, they have only
to look at some of the beer drinkers in the London
slums to see what is ahead of them. Beer makes
fat."-Statement by W. C. T. U. official.
MORAL: Prohibition was a success because it
taught women to drink whiskey instead of beer.
Whiskey doesn't make you fat.
A cat that jumped off the room of a seven-story
apartment building in Hollywood, Calif., suffered
only a bumped head and loss of appetite, accord-
ing to a dispatch. No statistics are available on the
number of lives remaining intact.
* * .
HE SEES OPPORTUNITY
KNOCKING LOUDLY NOW
-Headline
Definite proof, at least, that there's some-
thing left to knock on.
He was surprised the day after the party to
learn from her that they had been married by a
justice of the peace at the height of the festivi-
ties. He couldn't recall the wedding at all, he said.
The difficulty, he added, was that each of them
already had a spouse-Excerpt from, News Item.
A circumstance which, no doubt, disconcerted
him not a little.
Dear K. S.:
Light whines for beer are being heard all
over the campus these days and everybody
is getting set for a return of the good old days
when "mug" was a container rather than an
epithet and "Ein stein" was not a physicist.
What I want to know is this-are we, you and
L going to have beer soon or not.?
-GC. B. S. ,
Well, G. B. S., there seems to be some hitch
there, somewhere. Of course Michigan's voters
declared themselves wet in the presidential
election, we've got a Democratic legislature
that is nledoed to enio heer, the eighteenth

i

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS ARE EFFECTIVE
GET A 1933 M IC" IGANENSIAN
UNDER THE FOLLOWING PLAN
NOW A Five Dollar
I 5Oand Value for $4.50
DUE
I. APRIL 7
A Five Dollar j' O DUE:
Value for $4.50 MAY 15
aWTTV1nTrrUnA v _.1 mTTT TTcTiAv~

SHADES OF 1907
Rapid develonments occuring in the nrocess of

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