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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 15, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

N DAILY

thority to pass laws on prohibition; while others
hold that since the repeal of the constitutional
provision, the statutes on the subject are ipso
facto unconstitutional because they do not con-

_.

The Theatre

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form to the newly adopted amendment providing
for a liquor commission. However, repeal of the
state laws in the near future will clarify the sit-
uation, and conform to the will of the people.
At Washington, President Roosevelt has urged
the adoption of a law replacing the Volstead act
and legalizing beer. The 18th Amendment made
manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicat-
ing beverages illegal. The Volstead act defines in-

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editor1al -Associa-
tion andi the Big Ten News Service.
Mon an E g OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatcheb credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-GIenera1.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year. by carrier, $4.00; by
mrail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications.Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Renresentati es: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chienago.

toxicating beverages as those containing more
than one half of one per cant of alcohol. Modifi-
cation of the Volstead act, in other words a re-
definition of the meaning of intoxicating bev-
erages, will legalize beer prior to the repeal of the
18th Amendment.
As soon as the Volstead Act is modified, Mich-
igan will morally be free of any compulsion to
enforce a state prohibition law. While the 18th
Amendment and the Volstead law are in force,
Michigan legally does not have to enforce state
statutes on the subject, although it has been
maintained 'that morally, the state is bound to
supplement the federal laws. Legal questions could
be raised now which it would take years to settle.
But our legislators can cut the Gordian knot im-
mediately by modifying the Volstead act, repeal-
ing the state statutes on prohibition and then rat-
ifying the 21st Amendment repealing the obsolete
18th.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR...........XRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR ....... ..... ... ......KARL SEIlFFl:RT
SPORTS EDITOR................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOM~EN'S EDITOR........ .......MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.....MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.,
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G.
Barndt, Arthur 1V Cvrstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney F ranel. John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, Georgek M. Holmes EdwinrW. Richardson,
George Vain Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishmian,
Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..........BYRON C. VEDDEB
CR~EDIT MANAGER... ......... .....H#AR<RY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGDaR......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvl Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turnei; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culatior; Gilbert E. Iursley; Publications, Robert E,.

Editorial Comment
PRESIDENTS
The new deal of cards has been distributed, and
now we take up our hands to see what we shall
get from our new, administration. President
Franklin D. Roosevelt has his chance to lhave his'
name engraved in the annals of immortality if he
can get his country out of the slough. In fact, ifj
he makes good, he will be a greater man than his
astute politician and rip-roaring statesman rela-
tive, Theodore Roosevelt.
The name Roosevelt, is not the first to be de-
plicated in the roll call of the presidents of these
United States. John Adams, the second president
started the precedent by siring and raising John
Quincy Adams, the sixth przeident. Both of them
lasted for only one term. W, H. Harrison, the
ninth president, was followed by the twenty-third
president Benjamin Harrison, a grandchild. Ben,-
jamin Harrison also could not come back for the
second term. Theodore Roosevelt started the third
purple family in the annals of the presidency
when he started his term as twenty-sixth presi-
dent in 1901. He broke the hoodoo of the past
purple families by serving two terms. But can
Franklin D. Roosevelt do the same?
In the papers recently, there was shown an
amazing likeness in the main points between the
careers of Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin D.
Roosevelt. In addition, one notices, as the printing
presses are pounding out the currency to relieve
our lack of circulating medium, that currency
was issued in the depression .of, 1907 when a
Roosevelt was president as well as now when a
Roosevelt is president. And by the way, it does
look like that Franklin, the pre-election violet, is
going to dig up that rusty old war club of Theo-
dore. Skola!
-California Daily Trojan

THEY'RE IN THE AISLES-
IT'S PLAY PRODUCTION'S
"HAY FEVER"
By GEORGE SPELVIN
Most of all it was Noel Coward's play, of course,
but it was Play Production too-Frederic Cran-
dall, Billee Johnson, Jack Nestle-that shook last
night's average Ann Arbor opening night audience
loose from its carefully nurtured indifference and
brought it down in the most undignified and
spontaneous roars of applause.
Mr. Crandall, frankly, is something we had al-
ways thought was entirely beyond Play Produc-
tion's scope. There is a finish about his pompous
buffoonery; a maturity about his august ridicul-
ousness; a certain middle-aged complacency
about his absurd David Bliss. It was his char-
acter that gave last night's performance its touch
of professional polish.
Are we forgetting Billee Johnson? No we are
not. But this department has said so :many nice
things about that lady that saying them all
over again seems almost a waste of time. For last
night Miss Johnson was the same Billee that has
delighted student audiences for-how many sea-
sons?"
"Hay Fever" is about the Blisses-arty, temper-
amental, pseudo-Bohemian-about their guests-
uncomfortable, shocked, panic-stricken - and
ebout a week-end-rainy, nerve-wracking, abrupt-
ly ended,
Judith Bliss (Miss Johnson) is the theatrical
whirlwind of unrestrained and somewhat frighten-
ing emnotion about which the other characters
flutter, gyrate, and, at times, flounder. Most of
the gyrating is done by Mr. Nestle as Simon, and
if you remember "Meet the Wife" and "Beggar on
Horseback," you know that strange antics are
the stock in trade of that highly amusing gentle-
man.
There is little doubt that Frances Manchester
did the best work of her career to date last night.
As the flapperish daughter of the family, also
stricken by the Bliss malady, she at last has a
part that gives her a chance to employ her emo-
tional talents to their best advantage.
Of the straight parts iii the show, Sarah
Pierce's Myra Arundel was doubtless best. She is
charming and graceful, with plenty of carriage
nd presence to make her part distinctive, Uldean
Hunt, as Jackie Coryton, was satisfactoryily
shocked and horrified throughout the play, and
furnished a note of simplicity and cuteness,
MuSCaL Events

SUITS
and HANiDSOME TOPCOATS
SUITS
EXTRA TROUSERS
in Four Price Ranges
to suit anyone's i
pocketbook
$19.50 $22.50
$25.00 $29.50 i'
J. Schoeneman
and
C lothcraf t
Suits
TOPCOATS
$16.503$18.50
Single Breasted
Half Belk
Polo Model
The English Raglin {~
Shoulder Coat
Our Furnishing Stock is now
complete with New Spring
accessories that are necessi-
ties for the well dressed man
MNALLORfiY HATS
$3.50 and $5.00
Other makes at $2.95
309 South Main
The Down Town Store For
Michigan Men

11

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PADEREWSKI

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In
Choral Union Series
TO;,NIGHT
8:15 P.M.
ALL CHOPIN
PROGRAM
HILL AUDITORIUM

mHAY FEVER

Noel Coward's Bouncing Comedy
SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY 4:i3 P.M. 25c
MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW -- PHONE 4121 - 789
LABOR ATORY THEATRE
March 14, 16, 17, 18 /1 Seats 50 Cents
A PLAY PRODUCTION OFFERING

g I i
f
I
' i
y.I .
6'-

Tickets:

$1.00 - $1.50 -$2.00 - $2.50

i

I,-i

I

ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Alen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers
Lester Skinner. "Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Alger, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
GiuMmy, Billy Griflths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 1933
Union Haircuts
The Union is still charging 45 cents for hair-
cuts. Every other shop in town is charging 35
cents. The Union, a student club, is a non-
profit organization and exists solely for the
students. Yet the Union will not meet the town
rate.
Art Education And
The Dramatic Festival.. ..
HREE YEARS of Robert Hender-
son's Ann Arbor Dramatic Festi-
vals have educated many local theatre-goers to a
new appreciation of dramatic art and have un-
doubtedly had some influence on the standards
of amateur acting on the campus.
Consequently it is encouraging to know that Mr.
Henderson intends, even in the middle of the de-
pression to continue the season for the coming
spring. The four and a half week period is eagerly
anticipated by a great many students and towns-
people and to have discontinued it because of eco-
nomic conditions would have been a decided step
backward in the University's cultural program.
The principle which has been adopted by the
director of the Festival of having first class New 1
York stars come here to do a single play or two
and then give place to another star of equal
prominence has given to the season a versatility
and range in its presentations which cannot be
achieved by the ordinary stock .comxpany. Added
to this are the class of plays which are presented,
not infrequently plays which are, simultaneously
running on Broadway.
Many of the actors who appeared in last year's
season have been in shows, opening in New York
during the past winter. -Among them are Tom
Powers, Violet Heming, Patricia .C9llinge, Geof-
frey Kerr, and Violet Kemble-Cooper.
This same rotation principle has been employed
by Mr. Henderson this past season at the Bon-
stelle Civic Theatre in Ietroit with distinct su-
cess
The Dramatic Festival added to the May Fes-
tival has given to Ann Arbor .and the University
of Michigan a national reputation as a cultural
center and, as a purely educational feature for I
students, it deserves the support of the University
as a whole,
Prohib iohe
( 'ordhn Ilo, . ..
TKHE RE-OPENING of the liquor
question, in fact the first refer-
ence to it since the November campaign, brings
with it new complications which, however, should
soon be ironed out if the legislators follow the
mandate of the people as expressed in the recent
election.
The State of Michigan is in the curious position
of having repealed its constitutional provision re-
garding prohibition and having retained its sta-
tutory legislation on the subject. In other words,
prohibition is still in effect in Michigan. But Gov-
ernor Comstock has given voters to believe that as
soon as federal action legalizes beer, or the 18th
amendment is repealed, the state legislature will
reneal the state laws on the- question. In doing

NEW BOO0KS -- NONoFICTION
Marquis James: ANDREW JACKSON, the Border Captain $3.75.
James Truslow Adams: THE MARCH OF DEMOCRACY, Volume II $3.50
Eddington: THE EXPANDING UNIVERSE. 2.00
Sir Paul Harvey: The Oxford Companion to English Literature $4.50
Reinold Niebuhr: MORAL MAN AND IMMORAL SOCIETY $2.00
R. H. Bruce Lockhart: BRITISH AGENT------...$2.75
Wasserman: BULA MATARI, Stanley, Conqueror of a Continent $3.00
SPECIAL PRICE TO LIBR1ARIES AND R EADING CLUBS
WVAHR'CS BOOKSTORESi

PADEREWSKI
Ignace Jan Paderewski, world famous pianist
and one of the truly great men of this genera-
tion, will present an all Chopin program this eve-
ning at Hill Auditorium as the last of the Choral
Union concerts. The program follows:
Fantasia, Op. 49
Two Nocturnes, Op. 27
Four Preludes, Nos. 17, 16, 21, 24
Sonata in B-Flat minor, Op. 35
Grave-Doppio Movimento
Scherzo
Funeral March
Finale, Presto
Ballade F minor, Op. 52
Three Etudes, Nos. 6, 8, 12, Opus 25
Scherzo C sharp minor, Op. 39
Polonaise E flat minor, Op. 26

State Street

Main Street

0i

s

Rca d The"Want Ads

.a.

ROUGHNESS DYING
"Hell Week" has been under fire on two mid-
wvestern campuses for some time recently, and in
one case drastic action to bring curtailment or
abolishment has been instigated.
Ever since the first of the year, the Daily Car-
dinal, Wisconsin newspaper, has been sniping
away at the fraternity initiation system on that
campus. Its outcry became so loud that a faculty
committee investigated and brought about needed
reforms.
At present there is much discussion of the
subject at Michigan, but it seems to us that the
Michigan Daily has the best view of the matter.
. Under the heading "Time Will- Take Care of
'Hell Week'" the publication expressed.the belief
that it could see no cryig need for immediate
action, and that eventually the system of initia-
tion would die of its own accord. "Hell Week,".it
raid, "will be a thing of the past in two years at
the most."
We see no reason to disagree. It is probable I
hat such will be the case, here, the silly,- degrad-
ing super-rough stuff of the "old days" having
largely disappeared. It is one of the biggest steps
forward taken by Univevsity. Greeks.
-Ohio State Lantern
MR. MENCKEN SPEAKS
". ..The people have come to look upon
the Government as a cow with one. hundred and
twenty-two .million, six hundred and ninety-three
thousand, three hundred and ,,ninety-one teats,
and everybody entitled to one. teat. ,
"Why should we squander money on a zoo? By
what process of reasoning does a city decide to
build municipal golf courses?.. These are, private
enterprises. There are privately-owned public
courses, and certainly the man who can afford
reens and caddy fees is able to afford the aver-
ng membership costs of private clubs. The other
day I suggested that the City of Baltimore buy
me a park of hounds. I thought I should like to
ride to 1he hounds.
% . As as matter of fact, our National Gov-
ernment is bankrupt, together with nearly every
city in it. By bankrupt I mean that we have debts
we are unable to meet. We can only postpone
them--pass them along to the next generation.
"When anyone speaks of our national overhead,
the average person thinks immediately of the
veterans or of the army and navy. The truth is
that the greatest single drain on our national:
treasury is the interest and amortization of our
debts, and the second major item is the public
schools.
"There was a time when an American would
have been ashamed to acept anything from his

5000 WOOL TIES

Two Mazurkas, B flat minor, Op. 24,
33
Grande Valse brillante, Op. 18.

D major, Op.

S'bTARS

&

SRIP-ES

HAND WOVEN
HAND 1.,'.TAILORED
&egular $1.00, $1 .50 and $2.00 Values

- ---By Karl Seijfert- -
- Auto' dealers in Peru are buying old cars as
junk and making one good car out of the parts
of several decrepit ones, an idea that will prob-
ably occur. to the rulers of some of the South
American republips oefore long,
- * :I *-
Politics, somebody once pointed out, makes
strange bedfellows. But the politicians soon get
used to using the same old bunk,
* * *
NO ERRORS IN THIS WEDDING
5 MJNISTERS TO BE THERE
-Headline
Or more accurately, only one error-the
idea of getting married in the first place,
POME
Men who smile
At dented fenders
Would make good
Insurance vendors.
_=3woop,I
TENT YOUR BRAIN DEPT.
What's wrong with this sentence:
SOPHOMORE: Aw, come on, let's not bolt
even if Professor Jilk is 10 minutes late-don't
you know that every time you miss class it's
just like throwing away $1.17?
"I am the State," once declared France's Louis
XIV, a remark which might be interpreted as a
confession in Michigan these days.
* * *
WHO'LL PAY PRINTING BILL
FOR USELESS SCRIP ISSUE?
Headline in Detroit paper
Oh, just put it on our bill-we're one of
11nV .- - V' "T V.Q . i i..m . miA . .- ..

C
C
C
Of4

NO'liv

Ehl olp

3 for $2.15
6 for $3,95

HOSIERY SPECIAL -$1.oo
A large selection, 3 FOR

Just Arrived!
A SHIPMENT OF PLAID SHIRTS

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