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March 14, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-14

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__HTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

GAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
M.mber of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
┬░nMEMBETOF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited In this paper and the local newus
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During reguar school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925 ,
MANAGING EDITOR...FRANK 9. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR...........................KARL SEIFFERT
SP'ORTS EDITOR..........JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.. ....MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Reninan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
' REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G.
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewet, George M. Holmes, Edwin W. Richardson,
George Van Vleek, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
'Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Ranan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFFP
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............BYRON C. VEDDE
CREDIT MANAGER........ ........HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ic le, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
inn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-.
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
JosephH ume, Allen KnuRus ussell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudd~w, Robert Ward,
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beuah Chapman, Doris
( 1nTmy, Billy Griffiths, Catherine Mcfenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb.
TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1933
Union Haircuts
The Union is still charging 45 cents for hair-
cuts. Every other shop in town is charging 35
cents. The Union, a student chub, is a non-
profit organization and exists solely for the
students. Yet the Union will not meet the town
rate.
The Frosh Frolic's
Depression Price
T HE FROSH FROLIC committee
recognizing the financial strain
under which the student body is living, has re-
duced the price of admission to the annual affair
from $3 to $1.50.
It is natural for the sponsors of a class party to1
desire to give as elaborate and expensive a dance
as possible. Every Frosh Frolic chairman wouldl
like to put on an extravaganza and would like to
be remembered as the dance leader who put on
the best party in the history of the University.{
For that reason, we view the unselfish attitude
of Frolic Chairman John C. McCarthy and his
committee with the highest approval. Mr. Mc-
Carthy may not be remembered for the rest of his
college career as the man who put on the best
freshman dance in the history of the University,
but he should be remembered as a person who
put on a dance that people could afford to
attend.
Musical Vents
Coming at a time when the strain of economic
and other unpleasant conditions demand some
form of cultural surcease, the Varsity Band's first
1933 concert Sunday afternoon was one of the
most pleasant occurrences of the season.
Professor Falcone's happy choice of a Wagner-
Verdi program provided a brilliant afternoon. First
glance at the program made it seem a trifle heavy,

but the colorful vocal solo by Helen Van Loon
and her recitative-duet with Harvey Lyle Lyons
pointed the program sufficiently to make the
Wagner numbers even more impressive.
Wagner's beautiful "Rienzi," perhaps not as
well known as some of his other operatic num-
bers, was effectively performed in a way to offset
completely the common impression that the first
number on a program is usually a warm-up.
Second only to the famous quartet in afford-
ing delight to lovers of "Rigoletto," the aria,
"Cara nome" was a highlight of the afternoon.
Miss Van Loon has a voice that is increasing in
loveliness each year; a favorite on student recital
programs last season, she added greatly to her
prestige Sunday afternoon. The instrumental
background to her clear soprano was ably ex-
ecluted.
Full-throated bass and triumphant upper brass
sections made of the "Entry of the Gods into
Valhalla" a thrililng thing, lifting its lesser pas-
sages out of obscurity and lighting the theme
to a paean of solemn exultation.
Mr. Lyon's voice has not the full development
of Miss Van Loon's, but his part in the duet and
recitative. "Tutte le feste al tiemnn " also from

side professional recitals (and even in some of the
latter) in Ann Arbor's recent concert seasons.
Especially worthy were the bell-like horns and
baritones of the beautifully modulated woodwinds
in the opening passage and the crashing cres-
cendi with perfectly executed woodwind offset
on the theme passages. It is unfortunate that the
entrance of strings, particularly cellos, into this
number (although they had been a vital part of
the previous numbers) was so vibrant that it
was, vulgarly, reminisdent of a jew's-harp.
It is dangerous to pick out individuals in a
student recital, but the performances of several
sections under more than capable leaders calls
for commendation. Particularly satisfactory were
the performances of the upper brass under Mr.
Fulghum, the woodwinds under Mr. Stein and
Mr. Rainey, and the percussion under Mr. Smith.
After some seasons of percussion sections that
were powerful but inaccurate, mechanically pre-
cise but more-than-humanly intelligent work of
the percussion section Sunday was to be remark-
ed. The entire section performed as one man
witha vigor and an attention that was as delight-
ful as it was thrilling, especially in "Tannhauser."
Of Professor Falcone's direction little can be
said except that his control of the 75-piece unit:
is little short of perfect. We wish, however, that
he depended a little more on his hand-and-arm
gestures; for, without being rude, we suggest to
him that his "sh-h-h" in the more quiet parts car-
ries to every corner of the auditorium.
In general the concert, though little publicized,
appeared to prove intensely popular to the au-
dience that filled the main floor, the first bal-
cony, and a part of the second; it was evi-
dently one of the most satisfactory student re-
citals that have taken place here in recent years.
The only general criticism that can be offered
was shown in the evident disappointment of the
audience that the concert lasted but one hour.
Music lovers will look forward eagerly to the an-
nounced band concert for Wednesday, April 5, at
which time Prof. Joseph Brinkman will be the
soloist, with a piano concerto.

you think there is no life in the world like the
"arty" life. You want to go about being rude to
people. You want to be self-interested to the
point of incoherence. That is the spell of the
theatre, the spell that Coward, the old maestro,
knows so well. Obviously, everybody can't be art-
ists. What a world if they were. Yet Coward, for
the hour and a half that you sit and watch his
play, makes you feel that it is the all to be desired
life. Just as in "Private Lives," he made you
feel that the only way to make love was to roll
about like an insane person on the floor and dav-
enport.
Coward writes a thoroughly unmoral play, and
yet a thoroughly entertaining one!
-David Mott.
Screen Reflections
Prmrr stars mneans extraordinary: three stars very
good( ;wo stars goad; one star Just another pieture;
no ftar~ keep away from It.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"SO THIS IS AFRICA" AND
CHINESE STAGE SHOW
* *.**PROGRAM ENTERTAINING
FROM START TO FINISH
Alexander ..............Robert Woolsey
Wilbur .................. Bert Wheeler
Miss "More" ............Raquel Torres
Miss Johnson-Martini ...... Esther Fair
It laid 'em in the aisles.
Everything did. The feature picture, with Wool-
sey and Wheeler in a rowdy African burlesque of
the Martin-Johnson and other super-travelogues;
Paul Tompkins and his organ program; the long
Chinese stage entertainment. The three lumped
into one evening's theatre-going proved a night-
mare of- laughs.
First, as to Wheeler and Woolsey. In "So This
Is Africa" they have dropped out Dorothy Lee
for the darker charms of Raquel Torres, more en-
ticing as the tree-dweller (cf. "Tarzan of the
Apes,") who begs Wheeler for more and more
kisses. Next there is Mrs. Johnson-Martini, who
needs no introduction to readers of adventure
and pseudo-adventure-books. Add to that a troop
of moth-bitten lions, a motion-picture trip to the
dark continent, a 100 per cent feminine native
tribe that goes love-mad after dark, and you've
got a real spot to toss Wheeler and Woolsey. It's
the best they've done to date.
James Pickard's Syncopators and Prince Wong
kept last night's jubilant owl-show crowd cheer-
ing for more. Lota Wong's dancing act was en-
cored.
For once, advance reports have not exaggerated
the popular appeal of a program. -G. M. W. Jr.

-^

R~1hV FTHE WOR D .....
T~ ih S OPA NATURAL ISTS' QUEST .
SNc THE) -I WORLD... .......
S'lP3AT /NiMALS I H AVE KNOWN .

. . $ O4.0
. . $5.00
.$3.S50
. . $6.00
. . $3.50

'V itrfA IL'i ,L-Jq BOOKSTORES

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State Street

main Strout

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DANCING FROM NINE TILL TWO IN TIE TNION B JT.OOMiv NEXT. FIDAY NTI T
iIi
i The
i ~Is Now On y0
Yet it preserves all the dignity of its predecessors -- all the entice-
ments from five hours of dancing to 2:30 permission for the co-ed.
The committee, realizing the gravity of every student's financial
situation, decided that this year name would have to be sacriCed
to secure quality and so have imported, direct from the Pacific coast:
CH ARLES BRICKER and His HARLEQUINS

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Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The nanes of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
aked to se brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
CURFEW SHALL NOT RING TONIGHT
Well folks step right up to the box office and
get your tickets-Frederick B. Fisher speaking.
All I need now are a few peanuts, hot dogs, and
soda pop and I'll pack them in like sardines. Tex
Rickard ain't got nothin' on me.
Did you hear Fisher's "Show Boat" calliope
calling all good children to his "Big Top" last
Sunday night? As a student trying to study Sun-
day evening, I protest against a nuisance created
by the former Bishop to India's bawdy advertis-
ing. It is unfortunate that the Rt. Rev. Doctor's
congregation must be drawn by this means.
I have delighted to the melodious qualities of
the Cranbrook Foundation carillon, but gee how
I hate to hear cracked victrola records amplified
from the loftiest steeple in Ann Arbor. It is
certainly no credit to a cultural center such as
this. Perhaps some of the boys on the campus will
contribute some new records to Mr. Fisher's pres-
ent collection. Failing that, another alternative
would be to get a megaphone and croon from
the steeple in a jazzified version of the ancient
Moslem call to evening prayer.
Curfew!

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TICKETS AT SLATER'S, THE HUT, DEN, PARROT, UNION, AND FROM COMMITTEEMEN

P.

119

s, ,ta"'R TPIPIR

1

By Karl Seiffert
When a prisoner crunched an electric light
bulb between his teeth and then bit a corner off
a razor blade, Chicago police released him, ap-
parently realizing that a jigsaw puzzle fan is riot
always responsible for his actions.
"Compare our $250 funerals with those costing
$400 or more elsewhere," invites a mortuary ad-
vertisement. Well, as far as we're concerned, we'll
shop around a while longer before we go in and
get measured up.
DOMESTIC COPPER PRICE
RISES A QUARTER CENT
-Headline
What-market quotations on police cor-
ruption.
a ' * * *l

TheTheatre
MR. NOEL COWARD
Being a Pre-View to the Production of "Ilay
Fever" Which Opens at the Laboratory
Theatre Tonight.
Now that it is popular to be somewhat Vic-
torian we can sit back comfortably in our plush
stuffed chairs and shake a critical finger at Mas-
ter Noel Coward. Not that he hasn't been an ex-
cellent toastmaster during the hey-hey years
(that are gone now, thank God). For no one who
has any sap in his timbers can fail to be sent
frantic at Coward's wit. But like that certain
critic, whom we all knew and loved so well, we
laugh heartily during the playing of a show, and
then retire to our critical sitting-room to slay the
entertainer. Coward must meet the wrath of the
serious minded.
If you will look at any one of Coward's plays,
it doesn't matter much which, you will find that
the characters there are divided into the morally
good, and the morally bad.
Long ago Tom Taylor, the world's most pro-
lific playwright, who turned out something like
a play every fortnight, worked by some such moral]
division. With Taylor, the sweet, insipid, priggish
ingenue forever got the better of the plot. Times
have changed, for in 1933 Coward comes butch-
ering up this sweet young thing! In every Coward
play, the bad character wins, just as in every
one of Tom Taylor's plays the good character won.
Some of our stomachs rightly turn when we think
of the sentimentalism of the popular Victorian
drama, and yet the drama of Coward is not so
far removed from this-at least for sentimental-
ism. For Coward, by ingenious dramatic devices,
has convinced his audiences that the bad, un-
conventional people are really not at all bad,
that their state is really something to be desired.
It is a very interesting state, it is based on fol-
lowing the urges-namely, biological. It is frank,
and above all it is not hypocritical. Thus Coward
plots the interesting, or bad people, against the
dull, or good people, in his plays.
Go back to the theatre with the critic, and you
will find Coward one of the funniest writers of
comedy of our day. His stroke is not true like
Kaufman's or Connelly's, because it is based on
a false premise, but it is deft. Very much of the
age, and prodigiously amusing, his greatest skill
is in turning the line. He was brought up an
actor, and that accounts for the swift, snappy
npae of his clialonie This nrhhlva is nward's

POLITICAL NOTE: American Indians
forming a protective association to resist
attempt to give the country back to them.

are
any

EXTRA!
Complaints have come into The Blank
Blank office regarding the peddling of
"extra" editions through the residential sec-
tions of the city during the night and early
morning hours. Most of the complaints are
registered in polite phraseology, but indigna-
tion over the disturbance, or "nuisance" as
some describe it, is perfectly obvious. Blank
Blank "extras," they feel, should not be is-
sued or distributed at "unearthly hours."
Sleeping citizens could afford to wait at
least until daylight to be informed regard-
ing the California earthquake, for instance.
* The "extras" against which the com-
plaints were registered were not published by
The Blank Blank. It is a situation over which
we have no control
--Excerpt from editorial in local afternoon
paper.
Quite true, Mr. Editor, those extras were
NOT issued by the Blank Blank. They were
issued by The Michigan Daily. We want to be
a nice boy about this thing, Mr. Editor, but
we can hardly refrain from being just a leetle
mite nasty in asking you right out whether
or not you, as a newspaper editor, consider
a catastrophe in which more than 100 lose
their lives, thousands are injured, and mil-
lions of dollars worth of damage is done an
event worthy of being publicized immediately
in an extra edition, regardless of time of day
or night?
And then again, maybe you don't, Mr.
Editor. Maybe you wouldn't consider such an
event significant. Maybe you would even ac-
use The Daily of sensationalism, or trying to
palm off a mediocre story as of "extra"
calibre.
M. M a ei *o
Maybe so. Mr. Edliior. Mabe We dlid shock

Morning, Noon and Night it
brings you alert, accurate,
comprehensive information as
to who's who and what's what
in the world of affairs . and
right here on the campus.
But the real news includes
more than that, for it brings
you the best bargains in years

Of Ann Arbor usc the
Alichign Daily as the
J'cs/ I1 cIns of reachig
i hA r , . N .

.. . it brings you the newest
and best in fashions and all
sorts of goods ... all in your
own show-window, the ad-
- r -r1 A 1i

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