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May 18, 1932 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-18

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ESTABLISHED
1890

(Y

zut]C t

460
:411 at I

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

i .'M ..

1

I

I

I

VOL. XLII. No. 165.

SIX PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, May 18, 1932.

WEATHER: Fair today; Warmer.

PRICE IVE CENTS

CURTIS ADMITS
FN CONTACT
WITH KIDNAPERS

ROOSEVELT'S SON CAMPAIGNS

FRATERNITY GROUP'
WILL TAKE VOTE
ON RUSH ING PLAN
Interfraternity Council to Pass
on Proposed Rushing
System Tonight.
WILL BE SECOND VOTE
Faculty, Alumni Members to Be I
Elected to Judiciary
Committee.

FESTIVAL

ARTIST

'Festival to Open
Tonight;Gradova,
Pianist, Featured

Financial Difficulties
Caused Insanity,
He Says.
OFFERED MONEY
Phone Call From Wife
Brings Deceiver
to Senses.
HOPEWELL, N.J., May 17.-
Y P-A startling confession by
John Hughes Curtis, the Norfolk,
Va., "intermediary," that he had
perpetrated an "enormous decep-
tion" in the search for the slain
son of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh
was made today to police.
The 44-year-old boat builder
wrote his story of faking myster-
ious contacts with the supposed
kidnappers of the child and turned'
the confessionrover to police.
' Bats Were Imaginary.
The boats and all of the people
to whom Curtis has been referring
were creations of his own mind,
police were told by the manufac-
turer.: '{
"I honestly believe that for the
last seven or eight months I have
not been myself, due to financial
troubles," Curtis said in his confes-
sion.
"I was apparently brought back
to my senses by my telephone con-
MAN ADMITS KIDNAPPING
NEW YORK, May 17.-(P)-A
man arrested on a charge of
wife abandonment in Brooklyn
today told police he and five
other men kidnapped the Lind-
bergh baby.
Police said he admitted being
a narcotic user and that he had1
been drinking very heavily. Al-
though ity said they doubted
the truth 'ofhis story, they
started an immediate investi-
gation to check its details.
The prisoner at first gave his
name as Frank Smith but later
admitted he was Frank Par-
zych, 30, with a wife and two
children living in Brooklyn.
versation with my wife this after-;
noon, when she told me of the
troubles she was having and how
the children missed me and also
by my conversation with Inspector
Harry Walsh.
Was Offered Money.
He declared representatives of
two newspapers, one of which he]
named as the New York Herald-
Trlibune aid the other as the News,
and the Fox Film Co., had offeredr
him money for his "knowledge of
the Lindbergh case or pictures off
the baby."'
"The matter was brought to myE
attention during a conversation,
and due to what I now believe wasE
a distorted mind by brooding overt
it, I became insane on the subject,
which caused me to create the story'
in its entirety," Curtis added.
'I never knew the people I namedt
to Col. Lindbergh. Ty were creat-
ures of a distorted mind with thee
exception of Marie .Truesdale, whot
had no connection with the crime.t
B 1
ROERS SELECTED
TOHEADALPHA NV
Debating Group Elects Officers,
Recipient of Honor Award;
Initiates Pledges.a
Charles A. Rogers, '34, was elected;
president of Alpha Nu, men's de-
bating and literary society, at the
regular meeting of the society held
last night. He will lead the society
for the balance of the present sem-
ester and for the first semester of
1932-33. Rogers was the society's

oratorical ' delegate for the last'
school year.
The following are the men whc
will fill the other offices for the,
next semester: Leo W. Walker, '34,
vice-president; Arthur D. Hawkins,
'34, secretary; Bernard K. Konopka,,
'34, treasurer; Charles B. Brown-'
son, '35, oratorical delegate; James
C. Hendley, '32, senior critic.
The society also elected the re-
cipient of its honor award given
annually to the member receiving,
a degree in June who is deemed to
have rendered the best service to

Haydn's

Oratorio,

'The Creation,' to

Mark

Opening of Thirty-Seventh Spring
Musical Presentation.

James
New York,
cisco upon

Associated;!Tess Photo
D. Roosevelt (right), son of Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt of
is shown being greeted by Mayor Angelo Roosi of San Fran-
his arrival to campaign for his father in California. Mrs.

Roosevelt is shown in center.

Eleven Michigan Men Are Picked
For West Indian Summer Cruise

The day of the wind-jammer is
not over; at least for eleven Mich-
igan men .who will relive the lives
of the old sailors in a cruise aboard
the four-masted schooner, "Doris
Hamlin" of Baltimore, this summer,
to the West Indies in search of ad-
venture on a motion picture expe-
dition which will take them along
the trails of the old buccaneers of
the Spanish Main.
The expedition, known as the
Caribbean Motion Picture Expedi-
tion, under the direction of L. Ron
Hubbard of Washington, D. C., and
Philip Browning of Michigan, will
have for its primary object the
search of adventure with a camera
in which an attempt will be made
to furnish numerous short sub-
jects for "Fox Movietone News.
The cruise also will foster a num-
ber of different branches of trop-
ical research in preparation for
CILBRETH APPOINTS
NEW DAILY STAF
Seiffert, Thomas, Feldman and
O'Brien Receive Senior
Staff Positions.
Karl Seiffert, '33, of Detroit, will
be city editor of the Daily next
year, Frank B. Gilbreth, newly-ap-
pointed managing editor, a n-
nounced yesterday. Other senior
staff appointments are John Thom-
as, '33, of Flint, sports editor; Mar-
\garet O'Brien, '33, of Detroit, wom-
en's editor ;and Elsie Feldman, '33,
also of Detroit, assistant women's
editor.
Seiffert has been a member of the
editorial staff on the Daily for two
and one-half years, serving one and
one-half years as reporter and this
year as a night editor. He is presi-
dent of Sigma Delta Chi and a
member of Sphinx and Sigma Nu.
Thomas has been on the sports staff
of the Daily two years. He is a
member of Sigma Delta Chi. Miss
O'Brien and Miss Feldman have
been reporters on the women's staff
for two and one-half years.
Night editors appointed for next
year are Thomas Connellan, '34, E.
Jerome Pettit, '34, John W. Pritch-
ard, '34, Joseph A. Renihan, '34, C.
H.Bart Schaaf, '34, Brackley Shaw,
'34, and Glenn R. Winters, '34.
Sports assistants will be Fred A.
Huber, '34, Roland L. Martin, '34,
and Albert H. Newman, '34.
Junior appointments on the Daily
business staff, the Gargoyle and the
Michiganensian will be announced
later in the week.

which a number of modern-equip-
ped laboratories have been con-
structed aboard the sailing vessel.
The entire personnel of the cruise
is to be made up of college men
and the eleven men chosen from
Michigan were selected from over
1500 applicants representing all the
major colleges of the East. Seven
of the men from Michigan will
make the trip with all expenses
paid. They are: C. Wayne Mead,
Grad.; John J. White, Jr., '32A.;
Edward H. Groth, '34E.; Paul L.
Tietjen, '35E.; Willard H a p p y,
Grad.; Walter F. Kristiansen, '32E.;
and Percy E. Knudsen, Grad.
Mead and White were chosen as
staff members while the others
were chosen as members of the
general crew. Groth will be a pho-
tography laboratory man, Happy
will have charge of the radio trans-
mitting, while Tietj en, Kristiansen
and Knudsen will act as seamen as
part of an all-college crew.
Others who will go from the Uni-I
versity for the cruise, to start June
15, returning September 25, are
Richard G. Finch, 134E.; William C.
Stratton, '32A.; Robert A. Wolf,
Grad.; and James Auer, Grad.
Finch is being sent by the botany
department of the University to
study sea flora and fauna in the
tropical waters.
The cruise will consume approx-
imately 100 days and will take in
twenty ports among the less fre-
quented islands of the Lesser An-
tilles and the large islands of:Por-
to Rico, Haiti, Barbados, and Trini-
dad.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
HOLDS INITIATION(
Seventeen Initiated at Annual
Alpha Epsilon Mu Banquet.
Alpha Epsilon Mu, honorary mus-
ical society, held its annual initia-
tion banquet at the Union last1
night. Dalies E. Frantz, Spec SM.,
was initiated as an honorary mem-
ber, and seventeen music students,
all of whom are members of the
band or glee clubs, were initiated
as active members.
Winchester Richards, '32SM., the
retiring president, acted as toast-'
master. Cecil B. Ellis, Jr., grad.,
spoke on behalf of the society, and
Harold S. Gelman, '33SM., spoke for
the initiates. Other speakers were
Professors Palmer Christian and
David Mattern.
New officers elected were Presi-
dent, Ralph Fulghum, '33SM., vice-
president, Frank Riley, '33E.; sec-
retary, Truman Steinko, '33; and
Usher, Richard Becker, '33.

A final vote will be taken tonight
a t the Interfraternity Council
meeting on the proposed rushing
system for next year, which defers
rushing during Orientation week
and pledging during the first two
creeks of the school year.
The plan was passed unanimously
at the last meeting of the Council,
held on May 11. If passed tonight,
it will be referred to the Judiciary
committee for approval, and then
to the Senate committee on Student
Affairs. The plan will go into op-
eration next fall, if passed by the
later body, it is believed.
To Elect Judiciary Committee.
Election of members to the Judi-
ciary committee will also take place
tonight. Five will be chosen from
the faculty and three from the
alumni. President Ruthven will
choose one member from each of
these groups.
A body of alumni have been
working on a new rushing system
also. Their suggestions will be dis-
cussed at tonight's meeting. Both
the Interfraternity council and the
alumni group will back the plan,
which was drawn up by a cominit-
tee appointed by Howard T. Wor-
den, '32, retired president of the
Council, it was stated at the last
meeting.
Methods of organization of the
Interfraternity Council for next
year will be drawn up tonight, it
was announced by Edwin T. Turner,
'33, president.
To Choose Faculty Men.
Nominees from the faculty who
will be voted upon at the meeting
are Franklin Everett of the engin-
eerini school, J. K. Silvey, of the
zoology department, Prof. J. H.
Cannon, of the engineering school,
Dean Samuel T. Dana, of the For-
estry School, Prof. Philip Bursley of
the French detartment, Prof. C. F.
Kessler, of the engineering school,
Prof. William Housel, of the engin-
eering school, Philip Jay, of the
Dental School, and Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, head of the Health Serv-
ice.
James Kennedy, Herman Kleen,
Allan Connable, William Brown and
Phil C. Pack are the nominees from:
the alumni who will be voted upon.
Three members will be picked from
this group.
HENDERSON SOUNDS
OExtension Director Tells Senior
Engineers Golden Age Lies
in Future of America.
Offering a reminder that beyond
"each bend in the road there lies a
golden age of tomorrow," Dr. W. D.
Henderson, director of the Univer-
sity extension service last night
warned the senior engineering class
at their annual banquet not to be
discouraged because they were go-
ing into a world cast into the throes
of depression.
"History shows us," he said, "that
all civilizations have risen and then
fallen. The danger point lies in a
time of prosperity when men be-
come soft mentally, physically and1
spiritually."
"I know that there will be a gold-
en age of tomorrow," Professor
Henderson concluded, "for it is in
human nature. Man is the only
animal who likes to have his home
beautiful as well as comfortable.
He is the only animal that is pro-
gressively constructive, never satis-'
tied. Man is the only animal who
bends his knee in prayer."
Senate Will Vote on
Beer TaxBill Today
WASHINGTOl'N, May 17 - () ---
'rhe bi-oartisan r-oalition beh.d

the billion dcl!rr revenu! bill kept
it intact today in the face of three
assaults in the Senate. A night
session recessed, after agreeing to
vote by 2 p. n. tomorrow on the

Gitta Gradova, one of tne fore-
Imost women pianists now before the
public, will appear on the May Fes-
tival program opening tonight. 1
MICHIGANNN4 -
3-1
Wolverines Fail to Make Best
of Chances; Gene Braendle
Stars at Plate.
By Guy M. Whipple, jr.
YPSILANTI, May 17.-While the
Michigan nine was throwing away
chance after chance to score and
add to a slender 1-0 lead yesterday,
Michigan State Normal made the
most of breaks in the seventh and
eighth innings and accomplished
a surprise 3-1 win on the Ypsilanti
field.
A momentary mental relapse on
the part of Ken Manuel, Wolverine
first baseman, when he argued a
close play at first and watched two
runners cross the plate, was partly
responsible for the defeat, although
the entire team showed a lack of
punch when runners were on base.
Michigan pushed over a lone run
in the third inning as a result of
Tompkins' clean single to right, an
error by Seitz, Normal first base-
man, and a long fly to left by Su-
perko. The slim lead dragged on
successfully enough up until the
seventh, although failure to hit in
the pinches and ragged base run-
ning cost possible scores in more
than one case.
To start Normal's seventh inning
McNeal walked Christy and hit Co-
han with a pitched ball. The next
two batters he fanned, but Bailey
responded in the pinch by tapping
a grounder to Superko, whose
throw to first was a bit slow to
zatch the runner. Manuel took the l
throw, evidently believing the run-,
ner out, but Umpire Runkel had1
sben it differently and called him
safe. Instead of relaying the ball
to the plate, Manuel glared at Run-
kel while some 500 Ypsilanti fans
cheered violently as Christy and
Cohan crossed the plate to give
Normal a 2-1 lead from which
Michigan could not recover..
The other Ypsilanti run came in
the eighth when Michaelis doubled
and scored on Christy's safety.
Gene Braendle ran away with the
Wolverine hitting honors, smash-
ing out three hits while KenMan-
uel made up for his lapse by ac-
cepting ten chances at first in his
old style to retain his fielding av-
erage lead.
Box Score

Haydn's oratorio, "'he Creation," and a piano solo by Gitta
Gradova will open Ann Arbor's thirty-seventh May Festival tonight
in Hill a'uditorium.
Miss Gradova, who is the only featured pianist on the program
of the May Festival, will play Rachmaninoff's "Concerto for Piano-
forte, No. 2, C Minor, Opus 18." During Miss, Gradova's four concert
seasons in this country she has appeared as a soloist with the New
York Philharmonic, and the Philadelphia, the Chicago, and the St.
Louis Symphony orchestras. In a recent review in The Nation, she

To Distribute 1932 -
'Ensians on Monday
Distribution of the 1932 Mich-
ig~auensian will begin Monday,
according to Harry S. Benjamin,
business manager. All distribu-
tion will take place from the new
Publications building, on May-
nard street opposite Helen New-
berry residence. The hours for
distribution in the early part of
the wecK are: Monday, 10 a. m.
to 4 p. m,; Tuesday and Wednes-
day 8 a. m. to 4 p. m.
There are still 70 'Ensians left
unsold, Benjamin says, and these
may be ordered in the present
Press Building on Maynard street
near Nickels arcade.

UNION CANDIDAE
WILL BESELE-CTED
Nominating Committee to Make
Vice-Presidency Choices.
This Week.
The names of 12 men to be voted
upon at the all-campus election, for
the six vice-presidencies of the Un-
ion for next year, will be selected
this week ny a nominating commit-
tee, it was announced yesterday by
Hugh Conklin, '32E., president of
the Union.
The committee will be composed
of Conklin, as chairman; Roger -N.
Turner, '34L.; Jack Beechler, '32E.;
David R. Lewis, '32; and Frank B.
Gilbreth, '33. 1
Any member of the Union wish-
ing to have his name considered by
the nominating committee may do
so by presenting an application to
Conklin before Thursday night.
Students wishing to have their
names placed upon the general bal-
lot after the nominating committee
has made its selections, must pre-
[sent a petition containing the
names of at lhast 200 members of
the Union, Conklin said.
DR. JAMESCRAIG
DIES IN TORONTO
Former Professor of Semitics
Dies Suddenly at Home.
Dr. James Alexander Craig, for
nineteen years Professor of-Semitics
here, died suddenly Monday at his
home in Toronto.
Dr. Craig was born at Fitzroy
Harbour, Ont., in 1855. He receiv-
ed his A.B. and A.M. degrees at Mc-
Gill university, his B.D. at Yale in
1883, and his Ph.D. at Leipzig in
1886. He was profejssor of Old
Testament languages at Oberlin
college for four years, came to
Michigan in 1893 as professor of
oriental languages, and taught here
until 1912, when he resigned.
Dr. Craig was recognized as a
prominent authority in the field of
Semitics. He taught historical and
literary criticism of the Bible at a
time when it was dangerous to do
so, and was a pioneer in this field.
Among his pupils were Professors
R. W. Sellars, Charles B. Vibbert,
and W. H. Worrell, of the faculty
of the University of Michigan, and
Professors Steven Langdon of Ox-
ford, and Walter Pitkins of Colum-
bia.
Funeral services will be held Sun-
day in Toronto.
58 Killed in Hindu
Rioting at Bombay

f was termed the "foremost woman
pianist now before the public."
The cast of "The Creation" will
be the second largest to appear in
any of the presentations of this
year's festival. The oratorio, written
for solo, chorus, orchestra, and the
organ, will feature Ruth Rodgers,
soprano; Frederick Jagel, tenor;
Chase Baromeo, bass; Gitta Gra-
dova, pianist; Palmer Christian.
organist; the Chicago Symphony
orchestra; the University Choral
Union; and Conductors Frederick
Stock and Earl V. Moore.
To Give Six Choral Pieces.
. In addition to "The Creation"
five other choral presentations will
be given during the course of the
May Festival. Chief among these
will be "The Legend of the Invisible
City of Kitesh," by Rimsky-Korsa-
koff, which will be given Saturday
night. This will be the first time
,hat this work has been offered In
America, and many critics from the
United States and Canada will be
an hand to listen to it, many of
Vhem with a view to having it given
at a later date by the organizations
they represent.
Gustav Holst's "Choral Fantasia,"
Stravinsky's "Symphonic Psalms,'"
Protheroe's "The Spider and the
-Ply," and selections from Gilbert
tnd Sullivan will also be presented.
Ou1',tanding among the many
vorld famor svocalists who will
Sppear dui'ing the festival is Goeta
Ljungberg, Swedish soprano, who
will sing on Thursday night. Miss
Ljungberg reached New York from
Sweden only a short time ago,,
making her debut at the Metropoli-
tan Opera house on January 20. Her
performance at that. time created
a furor. Critics and public alike
were lavish in their praise of her
voice, which was acclaimed as one
of the very best.
Returned From Europe.
Negotations were begun immedi-
ately with her managers, resulting
in the postponement of her return
to Europe in order that she might
make her American festival debut
in Ann Arbor.
John Charles Thomas, who is
probably the most versatile bari-
tone in America, and who has
recently been featured with the
Boston symphony, will appear on
Saturday afternoon.
Juliette Lippe, who will sing the
lead in "The Invisible City of Kit-
ash" Saturday night, hails from the
SCovent Garden company, of Lon-
don. She has been especially chosen
for the difficult part of Fevronia in
the Rimsky-Korsakoff American
premiere.
Gigli To'Sing Friday.
Beniamino Gigli, generally con-
4idered the finest tenor in America,
vill sing Friday evening. Mr. Gigli
.as been a member of the Metro-
)olitan Opera company for the past
ten years, where he recently created
a stir by refusing to take a cut
in his salary. He has been generally
'ooked upon as the logical successor
o the late, great, Caruso.
Among the remaining artists who
tre to be a part of the program are
Vina Hager, Nelson Eddy, Eric
)elamarter, and Juva lngbee.
FINALS IN POETRY-
READINGAEHL
gilbert's Rendering of Noyes'
Poem Wins First Award;
Slama is Second.
Before a near capacity audience,
L. E. Gilbert won first place in the
poetry reading finals last night in
Laboratory theatre. Alice Slama,
Grad., was awarded second place.
Mr. Gilbert's best selection was
.the well-known "Barrel Organ" by
Alfred Noyes which easily won him

i

HONOR LAW STUDENTS AT CASE CLUB
BANQUET; TRACY ADDRESSES GROUP
Law students who have disting- School. Participants in the junior
uished themselves during the past Case club finals, who were awarded
year were honored last night by gold medals, are Ledlie A. DeBow,
yher schoolrathedastclubigan Robert D. Gordon, Charles E. Jones,
the school at the Case club ban- Henry Y. Morrison.
quet, the final event of the club for A set of Palmer's "Newton D.
the present school year. Baker" was given to those juniors
Prof. John E. Tracy of the Law who represented the losing teams in
college addressed the group with a the semi-finals, from the Story and
sketch of "The Famous Case of Ar- Holmes clubs: Paul Franseth, Ray
nold Miller," which occurred in Letton, Carl Urist, and James Leo
Prussia 150 years ago under the rule Warren.
cf Frederick the Great. Dean Henry Law Review subscriptions for
M. Bates expressed the apreciation three years were presented to the
of the faculty f-or the work of the winners in the freshman finals:
club during 1931-32. Paul G. Kaup- Russell A. Smith and Jarl Andeer,
er, '32L., was toastmaster. Holmes club; Allan Diefenbach and

MICHIGAN
Ferguson, cf
McKay, p
McNeal, p
Waterbor, ss
Superko, 3b
Petoskey, rf
Diffley, c
Braendle, lf
Daniels, 2b
Manuel, lb
Tompkins, p, cf
Wistert
1 *Douglass
MICI. NORMAL
Batterson, 3b
Christy, cf
Cohan, 2b
Seitz, lb
Packard, If
Bailey, rf
Wittkop, ss
Miller, c
Michaelis, p

AB
2
1
0
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
1
1

R
0
0
0
0
(0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

H
0
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01
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3
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0
0

0
3
0
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1
0
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6
2
2
10
0
0
0

A
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0
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1
0
0
0
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E
0
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0
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0
.0
0
0'
0

34 1 7 24 7 1

AB
4
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3

R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1

H
0
2
0
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1

0
2
3
1
9
0
1
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6
2

A
1
1
3
0
0
0
3
1
1

E.
01
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0

27 3 4 27 10 3
* Batted for McKay in seventh.
* Batted for McNeal in ninth.
MICHIGAN .._.. 001 000 000-1
Normal -..--.. _... 000 000 21x-3
Two base hits-Daniels, Michael-

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