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February 24, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-02-24

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

DAILY

HMIl

[ ,Union Forum Hears
Talk by Gov. Ritchie

FIN 0

Century B.C.
Report of

rtinued From Page 1)
ure found at the excava-{
, "it shows marked Hellen-
uence particularly in the
uge round columns and
illars of burnt brick orn-
orated, a feature that dis-,
entirely in the two upper
gh working with a smaller'
er a month was spent in-
ng the ziggurat known as
r, a mound complex, in ad-
the main excavation.
terman reports that "time
urces were insufficient to
ly excavate the tel, but
t work was done to reveal
stinct stages of construc-
of which from epigraph-1
erial recovered points to
ylonian period and gives
assurance that the original
marked the religious cen-
ie more ancient cities of
. Akshak that preceded the
cupation of that' site."
phical material recovered;
writings in Cufic, Phelevi,
-reek, Babylonian cunei-
merian, and Egyptian, al-
was fragmentary in char-
aterman and her daughter
accompanied the party,
3r as an official staff mem..
is Badly Injured
Fal From Horse
-enry C. Adams, of Naval
ture and Marine Engineer-
,rtmxent, was seriously in-
a fall from, his horse Sun-
rnoyn. Most of his teeth
ken out, his nose broken,
face was badly cut.
cident occurred while he
. Gordon L. Jensen, also of
nering school, were riding
about one mile north of

(Continue l From Page 1)
er depended upon the grace or fa-
vor of governmental authority, but
whreby authority itself was grant-
ed and defined, circumscribed and
limited by the sovereign people
themselves, and protected by the
guarantees of a Bill of Rights.
"Our system represents many
compromises and adjustments,
some of which even reflect the
fears and dangers of democracy it-
self, and these have helped to make
it workable. But its vitality does
not come from that. Its abiding
strength lies in the fact that it was
born of the people, blood of their
blood and flesh of their flesh, and
gave expression to the traditions,
ideal, and free spirit thatt nimated
them in their century old struggle
for self-government.
"The American ideal of self-ini-
tiative, self-expression, and self-
determination has actually come
true under the American system of
government. It is vWorth fighting
for, and if it is now threatened, I
believe we must look for its preser-
vation to that accumulated wisdorm
we call social science. It is on
these jural and social foundations
that our whole superstructure in its
last analysis rests."
He stated that the Supreme Court
was the most revolutionary contri-
bution made by the founders of the
Republic. This was necessary to
preserve tranquility between the
federal and state governments.
Speaking of the recent appoint-
ment made to the Supreme .Court,
to fill the vacancy left by the res-
ignation of Oliver Wendell Holmes,
he stated:
"It is certainly amazing and
laudable how general the approval
of Judge Cordoza was:."
MAJESTIC
Starting .Today!
Rising in Defense of
America's Boys and Girls!
YOUR CONSCIENCE
COMIVIANOS THAT

l
y
f,
i
f
r
Y
f!
1.
5
r
r
'
t
7
t
i
t
.

ASHINCTOIN PAPER,9
First President Was Influential
in 4Critical Period,'
He Declares.
"The usual conception of George
Washington's life from 1783 to 1789
is incorrect," declared in substance
,Prof. Everett S. Brown, of the Poli-
tical Science auditorium, in a paper
which he delivered Monday night
at a special George Washington
conversazione in the William Clem-
ents library. Professor Brown was
introduced by Dr. Alexander G.
Ruth yen.
"The usual conception of this
period in Washington's life, drawn
from popular biographies, is of a
successful and honored military
leader retired to the quiet of Mount
Vernon, from where he was called
to the constitutional'convention of
,1787 and to the presidency of the
United States in 1789.
"Such a conception overlooks a
very important part played by
Washington in the years which
have aptly been termed 'the critical
period' of American history. With
independence from Great Britain
assured, Washington unceasingly
threw the weight of his great in-
fluence toward the establishment of
a national government which would
insure peace at home and command :
respect abroad."

SUMMER SCHOOL
BULLETINS ISSUED
Bulletins outlining courses in
public health nursing, business ad-
ministration, and law, to be given
during the Summer term, were re-
leased yesterday by Dr. Edward H.
Kraus, dean of the sess:on.
In public health nursing, a short
six-weeks course :s o be offered. A
total of 11 courses have been decid-
ed upon.
The summer session for the
School of Business Administration
will last eight weeks. It will begin
Monday, June 27, and close Friday,
August 19. The Law school, which
will begin-Its 38th summer term,
will open June 21. and close Sept.
1, the class work being divided into
two periods of five weeks each.
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued From Page 6)
bought as early as possible as there
is only limited room.
Monday, Feb. 29, at 4:15 the Tols-
toy League will conduct a meeting
under the chairmanship of Prof.
E. R. Sunderland in Natural Science
Auditorium. Motion pictures of the
League of Nations work and of the
origin 'of the Kellogg Peace Pact
will be shown; Dr. Onderdonk and,
Mr. Quraishi will speak on the
Shanghai war.
Gargoyle Editorial--Meeting of
staff and tryouts at 4 o'clock today.1

(Continued From Page 1)
ditional switchboard panel. A cy-
clorara at the rear of the stage
upon which may be thrown lights
to represent various shades of sky,
will be used to form silhouettes of
the delicate tracery of the wood-
land foliage.
In order to accomodate the Uni-
versity Symphony orchestra, the
first three rows of seats will be tak-
en out.
Instrumental in the task of
adapting Hill auditorium to the
purposes of the operetta.- is Fred
Redman, technical assistant at the
laboratory' theatre. Others who
have been engaged in set design are
James Muir, '32, Robert Carr, 134,
Edward Holpuch, '32, and Robert
Mitchell, '34E. Francis Palms, Jr.,
?33A, has been in charge of the de-
sign of the entire prosceniulm and
sets.

Stage to Be kebuilt
for Union Operetta

THIS
COLON
CLOSES
A 3 P.M.

.Ia

ADVERTISING

Ua

NOTICE
TYPEWRITERS, all' makes,~bought,
sold, rented. exchanged, repaired.
0. D. MORRILL, 314 So. State.
307c
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-
GRAPHING pronptly and neatly
done. 0. D. MORRILL, 314 So.
State St. 308c
EXPERIENCED porter wants work
in iraternity house.tCan furnish
eightyears fraternity reference.
Phone 5537. 490

LARGE suite for rent, single
double. Close to campus
downtown. Price reasona
Phone 22352. 425 So. Division.
HAVE WORK for amateur ba
Address Michigan Daily, Box
interested.
FOR SALE
REPOSSESSED CARS-Buy f
Finance Company for bala
clue. We sell all makes of
cars at a discount. Investii
311 W. Hiuron. Phone 22001.
PERSIAN Oriental Rug, about
Ireasonable. 1324 Olivia.

' Wf
AT

RESTAURANTS

SHOE

REPAIRING
We Sptcdal zdl m

Qudaly

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WANTED

BOARDING

EAT-Meal tickets $5.50 for $4.50
Special Steak and Chop Dinner 40c.
Forest Inn 538 Forest Ave.
409c;

WANTED-Alto-sax man. Must
read well. Phone 8651.

BANK RUN
delivered,
Gravel Co.

GRAVEL,-$1
Phone 7112,

per yd.
Killins
296c0

BOARD-Good' meals for $4
week. Men and women t,
1302 N. University. 5949.
BOARD, $4 A WEEK-3 mea
day. 512 Mack Rd. Call 2
SUPERIOR student meals,
reasonable, only two blocksf
campus. Call 5139-

LOST
LOST-CresenL shaped pin
inun with diamonds;
week-end. Reward. Call S
4927

A. T. COOCH

r,11111tIFtrE1f [6I~iE11 11 I ~i i ti H ll fi I i fHIM, ti1171If 111111111[ 11111111
EFF Years oF
-Fai thqFul Se.rvicl>
For your convenience we offer the
Complete acilitles of a modern com-
mercial bank.
In our two branches we have an
experienced personnel prepared to ex-
tend the most courteous service.
IFarmers and Mechanics BankI
P Huron at Main Street 330 South Ma Stc Street
Member Federal Reserve System
fillI

&SON

STUDENT LAUNDRY WANTED-
Called for and delivered. Phone
4863. 150c
FURNISHED APARTMENT- East,
south, and west exposure; steam
heat, private bath, and shower.
Also 2 double rooms and garage.
Phone 8544. 422 East Washing-
ton. 492c

I 109 South University

WANT ADS P

YOU 'S

E IT!...

jSICAL
ENTS

ograms are given in i lal
riu. m unless otherwise noted.
ternoon concerts are given
admpission charge.
TLY 'BESEI3KRSKY, Vio-
NMABEL ROSSKREAD,
st, in Sonata Recital, Feb-
y 28, 4:15, Mendelssohn
LOTTE LOCKWOOD,
t Organist, March 2, 4:15.s
E CUYLER, Violinist, and
JI OKKEfBER, Pianist,
onaia Recital, March 6,;
Mend lssohln Theatre.
PONSULL , Soprano,
h 7, 8:15.
H BRINKMAN, Pianist,
h 13, 4:15.
H BRINKMAN, Pianist,
HANNS PICK, Violon-
t, in :Sonata Recital, March
:15, M/endelssohin Theatre.-
RSITY SYMPHONY
'FTRA, D"vid E. Mat-
Conductor, and HANNS
C, Violoncellist, April 3,.
,EY FLETCIER, Pianist,.
121, 4:15, Mendelssohn
tre.
B. STOCKWELL, Pianist,
24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
tre.
R CHRISTIAN, in Organ
a, every Wednesday at
unless otherwise announ-

N

'0

" ,
1

p,- "
..'v *i~
Vi"
a " " ".'" . 4.
' 4. k1

N-, 'EW DU

In order' to introduce the discriminate smokers of Ant
to the NEW DUNHILL PIPE recently displayed
public, for the first time in London and New York
we are offering our new and complete stock:

INTRODUCING THE

n Arbor
to the
Shops,

t

. EXTRA
TOM HOWARD
etnemployed Ghosts"
CAB GALLOWAY
Playing "Minnie the Moocher"
SATURDAY

Formerdy p
for
DUNHILL "ROOT BRIARS"/f
DUNHILL "SHELL BRIARS" $
DUN HILL "STANDARD,

The

TIALE

"WAYWARD"
NANCY CARROLL
RICHARD ARLEN

o aRT
"Look how clean and white I am. No

NEW GNUINE RUMIDORS AND HUMIDORS CUT
LESS THAN HALF PRICE

MICHIGAN

LI

NOW

PLAYING

buttons off, no rents or tears.
a good thorough Laundry."

That was

I

CALL

$10.00, Now $4.75; $7.5O, Now $3.95 5
A Lot for ........... .. .. . .
GOLDEN WHEEL POCKET LIGHTERS
Formerly $10.00 Only $1.95
1mes Off On All ouchesCig
CesSo m e a s l o w a s . . . .. . . . . . . . . .

' i

111

4117
and giwe your shirts a chance to tell a
simar story.

can sell ice to Eskimos, corsets to
rus girls and the Brooklyn Bridge
Broadway Columnist.
What a line! What a lover!

..25c

$1.00 Pipe Racks and Ash Trays .7
ALL $1.00 Pip*s ..ONLY 4
Bargains on Tobacco--$2.25 lb. Blue Boar $1.89. $1.25
Velvet and Prince Albert 98c. Granger R. Cut only 79c per
_Sale Lasts One Week, Feb. 24thi to March 1st

Laundry and Dry

0"UtI M /A

... .

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