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May 12, 1932 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-12

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12, 1932

THE

MICHIGAN DAILY

Dliicago

Alumni

Trophy

ill Be Awarded Today

f xHAVEGOOD CHANCE
Willis Ward Also Considered to
Be Likely Selection for
Freshman Honor.
Naming Lineman Would Break
Precedent of Three Year's
Duration.
Michigan's most promising fresh-
man football player will receive the
highest award today when the
coaches, gather this afternoon to
select the winner of the Chicago
Alumni Trophy.
This award is presented after
Spring practice each year to the
outstanding yearling on the quad.
Basis of comparison is determined
by the individual crop of aspirants
and this season's group is one of
the best in recent years.
Captain Roy Hudson won the tro-
phy three years ago, Estil Tessmer
the next year, and Herman Ever-
hardus last spring. Although it is
not a definite rule, it is usually true
that the winner of the trophy also
wins a Varsity berth in the follow-
ing fall.
Jerry Ford and Emling are the
two outstanding centers of the
yearling squad. Ford has a great
prep school reputation, playing with
Grand Rapids South. Both of the
centers will rival other candidates
for the honor although in the last
four years, the winner has been a
backfield candidate.
Willis Ward is. the outstanding
end candidate among the first-year
footballers. The tall rahgy wing-
man is especially adept at catching
passes. He can go high into the air
to draw down the pigskin just as
the famed Benny Oosterbaan did
in his Varsity days.
Russel Oliver is a hard plunging
fullback with plenty of leg drive.
His defensive tactics are satisfac-
tory and he is a good blocker. As
he is in the limelight in the back-
field, many expect the honor to be
bestowed upon him.
Ford, Ward, and Oliver are great-
est competitors for the trophy al-
though several other yearlings are
being mentioned along with these
favorites.
When the coaches convene today,
they will have a harder job than
in most seasons. Any one of these
three stars are ready to step into
a Varsity position next fall if the
regulars falter in the least.
WOLVERINE TENNIS
MA TCH POSTPONED
With the Michigan-Western State
tennis match again rained out
yesterday, it seems that the weather
decrees that the two teams will
never meet. The first postponement
came on Saturday afternoon, an-
other cloudburst intervening.
Coach Byrum of the Hilltoppers
notified John Johnstone, coach of
the Michigan net squad, yesterday
morning that the weather condi-
tions at Kalamazoo were such that
the match could not be played.
The outcome of the match would
have been very dubious as far as
the Wolverines were concerned.
Western State has a team which is
probably as good as any' collegiate
"aggregation in Michigan. Their
early season record shows victories
over Notre DMe and Grand Rapids
J.C. Most notable, however, was a
three-all tie with Chicago's netmen.
The Maroons have shown their
power in defeating Northwestern's
crack team by the score of five
matches to one. With the Wildcats
apparently holding an edge over
the Wolves in the unfinished con-
test of Monday afternoon,' Michi-
gan's hopes against the Hilltoppers

seemed rather dim.
Athletic Honor Group
Elects New Officers
Phi Epsilon Kappa, physical edu-
cation honor fraternity, held elec-
lion of officers last week. The men
chosen to pilot the organization
through the 1932-33 season are:
Kent Bowsher, '33, president; Stan
Kracht, '33, vice-president; Harold
Kammerer, '34, secretary; and Ed
O'Donnell, '34, treasurer.

Will Go to Most Promising Freshman
/J
II
:h I

MICHIGAN TO MEET
OHIO TRACK TEAM

BASEBALL PROBLEM COMPLICATED
BY STIFF SCHEDULE AND WEATHER

Coach Fisher Seeks Dependable
Relief Pitcher.

Above is shown the Chicago Alumni trophy which will be awarded
today to the most promising freshman football player. The trophy is
awarded annually to the man showing the best form in the Spring foot-
ball drills. Ford, Oliver and Ward are considered to be the outstanding
candidates.

ROOKIE HURLER PITCHES NEW YORK
TO 3 TO 0 VICTORY OVER ST. LOUIS

Brooklyn, Cardinals Battle
Innings; Phillies Lose.

12

American LeagueY

i}uckeyes Boast Power in Dashes
and Hurdles With Large
Numbers in Each. -
Chio's Buckeyes will play host tor
20 Wolverine thinclads this Satur-
day afternoon in the second dual1
meet on the Michigan schdule. The
Maize and Blue are the favorites
in the Columbus battle, although
the Scarlet and Gray will give the
Wolves a real struggle.
In the hurdle races the Buckeyes
are practically certain of taking
the honors, with their star Jack
Keller as the favorite. Black and
Johnson will also be in there to give
the Michigan timber-topper, Haw-'
ley Egleston, plenty of trouble.
There is no doubt as to the abil-
ity of the Ohio State barrier artists
as the shuttle relay team from Co-
lumbus captured the laurels in that
event at the Penn carnival two
weeks ago.
Fazekas is Threat.
The Ohioans also boast a great
array of dash men in Fazekas, Ben-
nett, Ross and Stapf. This quartet
composed the team which won the
half-mile relay at Pennsylvania
this spring. Fazekas will prove to
be plenty of trouble for Renwick in
the sprints, if he comes through as
the dopesters figure he will.
Another member of the Buckeye
squad which is practically certain
of a first place is Wonzewitz, who
cleared the bar at 13 feet six inches
to tie with Beecher of Indiana for
the winning position in the pole
xaF" in the big Pen carnival. This
mark established a new meet ree-
ord for the event.
Have Russel in High Jump.
The Scarlet and Gray are fairly
strong in the high jump, with such
men as Russel, who tied Juek for
laurels in the indoor meet last win-
ter, and Hochman.
Judging by the indoor meet with
Illinois and Ohio State the Wolves
look as if they will not have a great
deal of difficulty in besting the
Buckeyes, however the State team
has been considerably strengthened
since that time and promises to
put up tougher opposition this Sat-
urday.
Yearling Golf Team
Will Play 'B' Squad
Saturday Afternoon
Freshman golfers will have their
first real test of strength this Sat-
urday afternoon when they en-
counter the "B" team, which will
be composed of the six members of
the Varsity squad that do not make
the trip tohColumbus for the Ohio
State match.
Due to the skillful tutelage of
Coach Trueblood the yearling links-
men have shown remarkable pro-
gress since the opening of the
season. A list of the men who will
most probably play the "B" team
and their average scores are as fol-
lows: Sweet, 77; McKinley, 77 1-3;
Markham, 79; Seeley, 80; Ross, 80
1-3; Neahr, 81 1-3.
Trueblood wishes to announce
that any student who feels himself
capable of bettering any of these
scores is invited to try out for a
place on the team.
No matter which six of the ten
men the yearlings play, they will
have difficulty in coping with the
superior form and experience of
the "B" team.
JACK SLATER TO FIGIIT
Jack Slater, Michigan heavy-
weight, will fight on the Christ
Church A. C. program in Detroit to-
night.
If you Write, we bave it.
Correspondence Stationery,
Fountain Pens, Ink, etc.
.5rpevrziters all izakes.
Greeting Cards for body.
0. D. MORR I IL,
j So State St, Ar Arbor'

Michigan Nine Bats
at .243 Pace; Artz
in First With .434
Batting averages including all
games played up until Saturday by
the Michigan nine show that Avon
Artz, slugging outfielder whom
Coach Ray Fisher has used on and
off so far, is leading his teammates
with a ma rk of .434, having been
at bat 23 times for 9 hits and 10
runs. Artz also holds the top mark
for batting in any-one game, with
four hits in live times up in the
game with St. Paul's (Rikkio) of
Tokio last Wednesday.
Following Artz is Art Superko,
veteran third baseman, with an
average of .340. Tompkiis with
.285 and Waterbor with .277 have
third and fourth positions.
Artz's 10 runs aso hold the lead
in that division. Superko has 16
safe hits to his credit to pace the
total-hit column.
Ken Manuel has the best defen-
sive record of the regular infielders,
making only one slip in 99 chances,
which goes a long way toward mak-
ing up for his low hitting figure of
.196. Mike Diffley is another strong
player on the defense whose batting
has been definitely inferior this
year. Diffley has had three errors
against him while accepting 65
chances. He is seventh in the bat-
ting average list with a percentage
of .216. The batting average of the
entire team is .243.
The complete summaries follow :
(Only those who have made fifteen
or more official appearances at the
plate are included.)

by Fred A. Huber
'e 'problem: A team batting
average of .243, the hardest sched-
ule in many seasons facing them,
and only one pitcher of tried value.
Thus the appearance of two con-
Sceutive days of rain have only
further complicated the trials of
Coach Ray Fishcr.
During the remainder of the
baseball sehcdae the varsity
nine is due to face Ohio State
twice in two days at Ann Arbor,
meet Purdue and Illinois on
their home grounds on succes-
sive afternoons, and wind up

the year by meeting Chicago
on May 28, and Ohio State in a
pair of games the 29 and 30.
Fisher is not despairing in his
search for several hurlers to take
the burden off of Harley McNeal.
Lefty McKay looks like the best bet
aid evn wth a showerb heakinp

s
t
I

up the practice, Coach Fisher too Radical changes in the lineup of
McKay under the football stand the Michigan golf team that is
and drilled him on fielding hoppers scheduled to meet Ohio State Sat-
and bunts. urday for the Big Ten dual meet
Michigan appears to be slated championship, were announced yes-
for its first double-header in terday by Coach Thomas Trueblood.
many seasons. Unless the rain Capt. Lenfesty and Johnny Fisch-
abates the field will be a quag-, cr, the two mainstays of the team,
mire by Friday afternoon. In remain in the lineup, but John-
ethe event the opening game ny Howard, a veteran of two year's
with the Buckeyes should be experience, and Gene Hand will
rained out the Wolves will play give way to Alex Jolly and Eddie
a brace of games on Saturday. Dayton.
On the basis of the performances
of the past week this looks to be the
Ken Manuel is rapidly curing strongest lineup that Trueblood can
himself of a costly disease. That is muster for the all-important clash
puling his foot off of first base a with the Buckeyes. Fischer has
fraction of a second before taking turned in 72-73 for his last two
the throw from the infield. Nerv- rounds, Jolly 74-75, and Capt. Len-
ousness is probably the cause of festy a pair of 16's. Dayton has
this habit which was practiced for been consistcntly below the 80
years by George Kelly, now with mark.
the Brooklyn Dodgers. 'Manny' was The team will leave, Ann Arbor
detected once during the Illinois this afternoon for the Buckey;
game but there have been no com- stronghold and get in a day of
plaints since then, practice at the Scioto Country Club,
With the team hitting at only one of the finest courses in the mid-
a .243 clip and only two bats- dle west, before tackling Messrs.
men whacking the ball over Kepler, Florio and Company.
.300, a shake-up in the batting
order is almost a certainty. The
starting lineup will probably
remain the same against O.S.U., S A L E
but one thing is. obvious, thatSA LE
Mike Diffley won't be hitting All Shades $
in the clean-up position. SPRING SUITS
All Alterations at Cost
One of the greatest defensive C. DOUKAS
teams in the history of Michigan 1319 South University
baseball is what: the nine is now_
oeing called, and the exhibition put
on by Ted Petoskey against Michi-
gan State would seem to prove this
assertion. Rest Next Sunday at
Petoskey made three catches DerbrnIn
a o' Inn
that were far above the aver-
age turned in by the ordinary A restful interlude between
college outfielder, and then strenuous weeks is a week-end at
climaxed his performance with D~earborn Inn. Special week-end!
a brilliant throw to the plate rates to faculty members include
in therixten thhinningcuttingSaturday evening dinner and
in the sixteenth inning, cutting Monday breakfast. Early Ameri-
off Abe Eliowitz with what can charm and old-fashioned
would have been the winning meals are delightful features of
tally. this real New England Inn.
Bridge in the Colonial Lounge;
pingpong, indoor golf and other
amusements in the Recreation
Room, at no extra cost. A nearby
stable provides riding horses.
'iled roof promenade. Charm-
e ing Colonial bedrooms equipped
with every modern luxury and
comfort. Breakfasts and a la
carte service in the English Cof-
fee Shop-table d'hote lunch.
cons and dinners in the Early
American Dining Room. 'Phone
learborn 1810 for reservations
and rates.
Ample parking space and garage
Don't be late for class,
but don't miss your din-
ner. Let .us hdp you
with our prompt service.
THE ESSEX Opposite the Ford Airpgrt
RESTAURANT Oakwood Boulevard Dearborn
f jo~h Iivri)~l/ Michigan
1204 Mouth University1

I

Johnny Allen, rookie hurler of the
New York Yankees, turned in one
of the best pitching efforts of the
year yesterday in allowing St. Louis
only five hits while his mates were
gathering eight off the offerings of
two Brown pitchers, the Yanke 's
winning, 3-0. The defeat dropped
th.e Browns into sixth place in the
American League and gave the
Yanks their fourth straight victory.
The New York-St. Louis game
was the only game .to be played in
the junior loop, the other games
being called due to cold and rain.
The Tigers, after shutting out the
Red Sox in their only game, will
move to Washington today for a

W L
Washington....... 17 5
New York .........14 6
Detroit ...........13 8
Cleveland .........16 10
Philadelphia ..... 9 12
St. Louis .........11 15
Chicago ...........6 17
Boston ........... 4 17
National League
W L
Chicago..........17 6
Boston...........13 8
Cincinnati... .....15 12
Philadelphia...... 12 11
St. Louis .........11 14
New York .........8 12
Brooklyn . .........8 13
Pittsbur.h 7 15

Pet.
.773
.700
.619
'.615
.429
.423
.261
.190

a
a

Pet.
.739
.619
.556
.522
.440
.400
.381
.318

Batting Averages

< <w~ z,..a .. , ..

AB R
Artz, rf......... 23 10
Sunerko, 31.)....47 3
Tompkins, 1), ef . 28 4
Waterbor, ss .... 36 7
Petoskey, 1f, p ... 33 5
Ferguson, cf..... 26 5
Wistert, 1b, p ... 18 6
Daniels, 2b...... 38 4
Kracht, ss....... 15 1
Manuel, lb, p ... 31 1
Diffley, c........42 7
Braendle, if...... 28 5
McNeal, P.......16 1
Team batting average-

H
9
16
8
10
9
7
4
8
3
6
8
4
2
.243.

Pet.
.434
.340
,285
.277
.272
.269
.222
.210
.200
.196
.190
.143
.124

k
1<
1
l

series. Opening Zone Rounds
In the National league, Brooklyn
and St. Louis battled twelve innings in Cup Play Completed
before the Dodgers got to the Car- --
dinal's pitcher for three runs to (By the A.ssowia'd IPrrss)
win the conflict. Play on an international tennis
At Cincinnati, the Reds managed front Wednesday had brought the
to get the batting eyes against the European and North American
Phillies, gathering 10 hits from Col-
lins and Grabowski Lombardi, Ciao- zones of Davis Cup competition to
cinnati catcher, was the big gun the second round.
of the Red attack with two hits The victory of Italy over Egypt
which scored three runs. completed the first round of Euro-
AMERICAN LEAGiE pean play yesterday, as the United
St. Louis ....000 000 000 - 0 o() States Mexico, Australia and Cuba
New York 000 001 03x-- 3 8 0 finished preparations for the start
Batteries:CGray, Kimsey, and Fer- of their second round ties i twe
Bell; Allen and Dickey aAmerican zone today. The United
States will meet the Central Amer-
Detroit at Boston, coid. ican Republic at New Orleans and
Cleveland at Washington, wet Australia will clash with Cuba at
grounds. Havana.
Chicago at Philadelphia, rain. The only surprise in European
play was the defeat of Czechoslo-
vakia by Austria. The Czechs, with
NATrIONAL LEAGUEthe same team, were zone finalists
Brooklyn 000 003 000 003-- 6 12 1 against England last year.
St. Louis 000 210 000 000- 3 9 0 Japan was one round ahead of
Batteries: Mungo, Shaute, and the field in the European zones
Richards, Lopez; Hallahan and Wil- { with a first round bye and a 5-0
son. victory over Greece, but the other
Philadelphia 010 000 000- 1 5 Q, nations still have second-round
Cincinnati ..000 102 10x- 4 10 0 'matches to play.
Batteries: Collins, Grabowski, and - --
McCurdy; Lucas and Lombardi.
Boston at Pittsburgh, rain.
nEN AVANT .qF, rw,..d
New York at Chicago, rain. f V o

10c per PageU

11

Thesis

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