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May 04, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY

MADDY INVENTS NEW TYPE VIOLIN;
WILL REPLACE OLD INSTRUMENTS
By Jerry E. Rosenthal Interlochen, the National High
A revolution in violin manu- School orchestras' summer camp,
facturing has been perfected by has been interested in metal string
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy, of the instruments for the past four years.
School of Music and Carnegie Wishing to seek a good metal sub
foundation fellow for the further- g
ance of music in Michigan, who has stitute for the easily damhd bas
announced that his aluminum viols used in orchestras, he finally
violin being manufactured by a found a 40-year-old German alumn-

STR- AW VOTE TEST
Hoover Is Second Choice in Poll
of Students at Princeton
Political Convention.

MAURERH PRESENTSI
LABR PROBLEMS,

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Instructor, Two Students
of Living Conditions
in Ohio Mines.
Government ownership of n

Tell

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Hackett Is Featured
in New York Program
Arthur Hackett, the professor of
voice in the School of Music, was
the featured artist on the New York
Oratorio society's presentation of J.
S. Bach's "B Minor Mass" Monday
night in Carnegie hall of that city.
Hackett has sung with the organ-
ization several times in the past
and was specially invited to partici-
pate this season.
Also on the program, which is one
of the outstanding musical events
in the east, was the New York
university glee club, winner of the
1931 intercollegiate glee club con-
test and Jeanette Freeland, a for-
mer May Festival artist.

All Crew Members, Supervisors,
Team Captains and Student sub-
scription salespeople who wishsto
avail themselves of the opportunity
for free scholarship's made possiblc
through the courtesy of the National
Magazine Publisher's again this year
are requested to apply to the national
organizer M. Anthony Steele, Jr.,
BLox 244, San Juan, Porto Rica, stat-
ing qualifications fully.
WANT ADS PAY

NOTICE!

(SE)eci;il to The Daik )

mines

PRINCETON, N.J., May 3.-Poll-

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inum instrument which he us:d for iing a total of 37 votes, Newton D.
a sample. Baker was victor in a presidentials
Soon afterward he was producing straw vote conducted yesterday at
modern aluminum bass viols and the annual student convention ofI
these instruments are now in con- national political issues which is

is the only solution to the difficul-
ties that today confront miners
and operators, in the opinion of
Wesley H. Maurer, of the depart-

stant use in orchestras throughout being held here this week.j
the country. Because of their more The convention, which includes
delicate nature, violins were at first delegates from 21 Eastern colleges,
thought to be hopeless in the field gave Baker 37 votes. Hoover re-
of metal work but in several years I ceived 34 votes while Norman
of experiments with the Aluminum Thomas, socialist candidate, was
company of America, he finally per-- third with 26 votes. Other results
fectedlthe instrument which will were: Roosevelt 13, Smith 10, Ritch-
soon be distributed. ie 3, La Follette 2, Foster 1, Dawes
Violin Is In Two arts ., Murray 1, Norris 1, and Young 1.
The violin is made in two parts, Delegates to the convention ex-
electrically welded and is metal pressed their belief that the ques-
throughout except for the finger tion of prohibition, unemployment,
board, bridge and other accessories. and war debts should be the out-
Its value, as expressed by Maddy, standing issues in the coming pres-
lies in its insusceptibility to atmos- idential election.
pheric changes and its elimination Concerning the prohibition, ques-'
of glued seams and joints which tion, 70 delegates voted for repeal
cause a great deal of trouble with : of the 18th amendment, 51 for
wooden violins. modification, and 15 for enforce-
Instrument experts who have ment.
tested the violin are of the opinion Voting on the issue of American
that, due to the popularity of metal membership in the League of Na-
clarinets and flutes, the new instru- tions, 98 expressed themselves in
ment will probably also be taken up , favor of membership in the ILeague
by students and orchestras. while 42 were against such a meas-
-----es- ure. A vote on, American adher-
Canadian Universities ence to the World Court showed 126
for and 13 against.
to Form Press Union
--- HURRICANE DAMAGES YUCATAN
(Special Th11 I ily )
TORONTO, Ont., May 3.-In order MEXICO CITY, May 3.-(P)-Re-
to reduce the amount of "filler" ports from Progreso, Yucatan, said
news from American sources. Cana- considerable property damage was
dian school newspapers have form- caused there by a hurricane Mon-
ed a press union which will serve day. It was feared some lives had
them with Canadian news, it was been lost at Merida, the state cap-
announced here today. itol, and further inland.

nment of journalism, who spokej
on Sunday in a general discussion
conducted under the auspices of
the Student Fellowship of the Con-
gregational church.
Maurer's talk was preceded by a
description of conditions in the
Hocking valley coal district in Ohio
by Samuel Romer, '33, and Wilfred
Sellars, '33, who spent the spring
recess there.
Maurer, who was formerly city
editor of the Messenger in Athens,
the center of the Hocking valley
district, analyzedconditions there
as he had observed them, and
stated that he believed their un-
derlying causes lay in the general
economic and social system of the
United States. He illustrated his
argument by describing the manner
in 'which capitalists in the larger
metropolitan districts are able to
invest money in far-removed com-
munities that they have perhaps
never even seen;

-dance to reuel kenyon's ten pece band
at .the hut tonight . . food by finigerle
no extra charge at any time
as the Germans knew it
and we barely tasted it
"Comrades of 1918
GERMAN TALKING PICTURE
WHITNEY THEATER
Three Days-Friday Saturday; Sunday
Ccntinuous 1 to 11 p. in. 35c to 6 p. m., Nights 50c

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STAR TING
TODAY
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STARTING
TODAY
Rcnoanhozscomafee
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OUR

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Painting &' Decorating Dept.
Is equipped to handle anything you may require in this
line. Even though our prices on both labor and ma-
terial have been considerably reduced, we still main-
tain only the highest quality of workmanship.

Oswald A. Herz

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112 Wst Washington Street

Sunday-"Tarzan, the Ape Man"-Joh ny Weissmuller

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Today
Final
1932l

.o9orrow
Campus Sale

41chlgtetn'11S1a.I1

50.0
NO SALE OF BOOKS ON CAMPUS AFTER
M AY5th
19 2 Michiganensi

The

WILL BE DISTRIBUTED DURING THE
WEEK OF

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--Ad .do. .g

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111111 "W Air A "I "!" -09 /' 49 11111

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