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February 20, 1932 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 THt MICIICAN IDA1LY _________+ _________

111 FROM EXPERIENCES OF {TS AU THOR
Story Is Built Around Tyranny has been greatly infiuenced by this
of Domineering institution. Three ,of her sons are
Michigan graduates, and the play-
Father. wright exects to obtain her degree
F here.
By Josephine Woodhams, '34, She ha staken severalnruesin

WE~l |LL HOLDj
Affair This Afternoon to Open
Activities for Second
Semester.
A skating party will open the
Women's Atheltic association activ-
ities for the second semester. This
affair will be held at the Coliseum
this afternoon. All women, wheth-
er members of the W. A. A. or not,
are invited to attend.
The participants are to meet at
the field house at 2:15, and will go
from there to the Coliseum. Be-
ginners, as well as experienced
skaters may attend and may obtain
instruction.
The general admission to the
rink will be charged. This is a fee
of fifty cents, but a strip of tickets
may be purchased for. one dollar.
All those who plan to skateare
warned that they' must have their
athletic coupon book, and their
identification card.
The group will return at 4:30 to
the field house where refreshments
will be served. The party is in
charge of Martha Boehmer, '32Ed.
Glendora Gosling, '33, is outdoor
manager, and has planned this ser-
ies of club parties. Miss Mary Stew-
art, instructor in physical educa-
tion, is faculty advisor.
STUDENTS IMITATE
OLD SLANG, BELIF
Dean of Smith College Discusses
Present Day Words.
There was a phase when college
students used to set the pace in
creating new slang words and
phrases, but now they seem content
to imitate, according to Dean Mar-
jorie Nicolson of Smith college in a
recent issue of the National Stud-
ents Federation of America bulle-
tin.
Dean Nicolson told Smith under-
graduates at chapel last week that
they were a generation behind the
times in the matter of slang, which,
she said, was accepted as a natural
part of language v ne by scholars,
because it was pungent and brief.
The saie old words prevail
throughout the country, she declar-.
ed. Until students. can devise some-
thing better -than "okay" and "KO",
they might just as well use "yes",
the dean advised.
WASHINGTON (IP)-Long silver
earrings with tiny silver bells which
tinkle as tie wearer walks or turns
her head are being'seen and heard
here.
The earrings are made abroad,
and their dainty chimes are so soft
that the sound 'is hard to locate
immediately.

AMERICAN COLLEGE SYSTEM LACKS
SPECIALIZATION OF ENGLISH SCHOOL
Miss Stebbing Believes Women der to obtain their degree, instead
Here Have Rare Social of the course examinations com-
monly used in American colleges.
Gifts. Miss Stebbing, who has been lec-
turing at Barnard college. 'feels

M ICH lOAN
INiNA

1

I h

The complete lack of specializa-1
tion in the American college sys-
tem marks its greatest difference
from the English system, in the
belief of Miss L. Susan Stebbing,
visiting lecturer from the Univer-
sity 'of London, according to an
article in th6 National Students
Federation bulletin.
Another difference that struck
Miss Stebbing is the way in which
undergraduates "receive their edu-
cation in bits." In England, stu-
dents take one, or at the most, two,
comprehensive examinations in or-
SWIMMING CLUB
TO HOLD TRYOUTS
All Women Urged to Compete
in New Organization.
Tryouts for the swimming club
will be held at 10 o'clock this morn-
ing in the Union pool. The regular
fee of twenty-five cents will be
charged and the tryouts will wear
regulation tank suits.
This is the first year that a
swimming club has been organized
here, and all those who are inter-
ested in making the club a success
are cordially invited to attend the
tryouts.
The organization is headed by
Corrine Fries, '33, who is also
swimming manager of the Wo-
men's Athletic Association.
It is expected that those who
participate in the club activities'
will receive W. A. A. p;oints. K.
French Husbands to
PARIS, Feb. 19-( P)-A recent
decision makes it appear that
French wives are governedN-byplaws
dating from the time of Napoleon
the First and, like it or- not, must
have their husbands' permission to
spend money legally.
This development came as a sur-
prise to many Parisian wives when
a recent trial was featured in pa-
pers here.
A furniture dealer was sued for
100 francs, about $4, by a husband
who claimed his wife had no legal
authority to give the merchant that
sum as a deposit on a dining room
set.
He alone, his lawyer said, had the
right to spend money for the fam-
ily account.
New
Arrials.

B-b rn "L d b11U 'CC~
that American girls are less shy
than those in England, and are
much more gifted socially, much
more able to talk. She has been
particularly i mpr e s s e d by the
friendliness of the students in the
dormitories.
Suits And Ensembles
Achieve Popularity
for Coming Season
By B. A. C., '34.
Suits and ensembles of all types
command atention as Spring lends
some promise of fulfillment. For
the coming season suits, apparent-
ly, are to assume more than their
usual share of popularity, and as
soon as heavy coats can be safely
shed, they will speedily replace
them.
One suit which demanded out at-
tention was of a strange shade of
blue, which had an almost purple.
tinge. It was dark enough to be
practical, and yet bright enough to
be cheerful. The coat was short
and was trimmedEby a large black
Persian lamb collar of the shawl
type. The coat was short, and had
a narrow belt, which was fastened
by a large black buckle.
The skirt was long, and flared;
the r~iaterial used was a heavy,
rough -finished tweed. The blouse
which was worn with it was a very
lovely one of gray satin. The collar
was large, crossed over one side and
continued down the bodice in diag-
onal steps. The buttons which were
used in the. trimmin g were unusual:
ones, and were of crystal, encircled
with a tiny row of brilliants.
Oriental Students
BAZAAR
Many varieties of hand-made
articles as--
EMBROIDERY
IVORY{
PERFUME
PRINTTS
NAPKINS
HANDKERCHIEFS
SILK SHAWLS
BRIDGE and
LUNCHEON SETS, etc.
Sold at very reasonable prices.
Do not miss this opportunity.
Annex Store

Contest to Be First One Jud
of Year of Conference
Competition.
Members of the women's va
negative debate team are prepa
to leave for Bloomington, Ind.,
Wednesday morning where
will participate in the Michi
Indiana debate Thursday n
The women who are making
trip are: Jean Hagaman, '33, :
thy Daniels, '32, and Gladys B,
'33.
The debate with Indiana wi
the first judged contest of the
as it is in conference competi
The proposition which will be
bated is: Resolved that. I
should be given immediate i
pendence from Great Britian.
The question of India's prop
independence is being discusse
all of those universities in the :
dle west which make up the
Ten conference with the excel
of Chicago.
Michigan will meet two univ
ties in' decision contests. The
diana debate will be next week
the Northwestern women a
speak here on March 4.
In the competition last
Michigan aefeated a team
Ohio university but lost to Ind:
Northwestern university- has
met Michigan in women's de
for several years.
The schedule of women's de
ing activities has , been exter
this year as many of the small
leges in Michigan have been
on the question ,'of the cane
tion of war debts.
S U AN D A Y
1N NE R
Served 11 A. M.
to 8 P. M.
All You Can Eat
60c
PULLEN
CAFETERIA

I

Iie Collinis

.o "

k

Bi-Centennial
Celebration

CLEARANCE

of

T ODAY begins a nation-wide Bicentennial Cele-
bration in honor of the father of our great
country. It is of no small significance that it
comes this year when it is so needed.
May it make us again aware of America's greatness,
stir us with new patriotism, and inspire us to pre-
serve those wondrous ideals our forefathers fouogt
to establish. Let us be reminded that our recent
"hard times" are as nothing compared to the adver-
sities they suffered.
Let us now enter into the spirit of the Washington
Bicentennial celebration resolved to come through the
-fray with colors flying-a stronger, greater nation
than .ever before!

o

*Prints
and Suit's
for Spring
There are two ways for you
to attract attention this com-
ing Spring . . . one is by
wearing the unusual prints
we are offering . .. the other
is to go tailored from morn-
ing till night. These new
suits and prints, born in Paris
and raised in New York, are
the key to early Spring
smartness.

FRO:CKS
AT HALF-PRICE
We're celebrating the Washington Bi-Centennial with a
HALF-PRICE CLEARANCE ON FROCKS. Frocks
for all occasions are included in this event-dresses for
daytime wear, sportswear, street, Sunday Nite Supper
and evening frocks.
$16.75 and $25.00
FROCKS for
$8.s38 and12.,5O

SILKS
CHIFFONS

WOc

VEIL

Ranging in size from 11 to 44

III

III

1

[III

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