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October 09, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY___ _I

ewman, Hozer

Will Not Be in Lineup Saturdan

MINNESOT A AND STANFORD TO BANK
TiON THESE STARS IN THEIR BATTLE
I OF MISTERY ____---

f P

. ,.

II

Stagg Drills Chicago
for Suprise Offense

VEENKER TO
AGAIST Mye

MATCH HIS CYCLONES
fORIAS' tITANS TONIG*HT

4111W

reshmen Use New Plays to Test
Varsity Strength; Brisk
Offense to Be Used.
Two regulars will be missing
hen the Michigan Varsity meets
e University of Chicago tomor-
)w. Stanley Hozer and Harry New-
an will be on the bench, giving
ay to Douglass and Westover.
A light workout in the Stadium
scheduled for today for the Wol-
rines. This will be a final round-
g out of the Vasity in prepara-
on for Stagg's mystery team. Chi-
,go's strength is uncertain as they
d not play last Saturday and
eir opening double-header did not
low much of their ability.
Drill on Defense.
Freshmen were sent through a
ial dummy scrimmage in an effort
give the Varsity the best possible
fense for Chicago's plays. A brisk
Fense will be aided by the new
ays that Coach Kipke has ar-
nged. Michigan expects to open
more this season than ever be-
re and keep on the offensive for a
iater share of the game.
Deception will play a large part
the game tomorrow judging from
e practice last night. With new
ays and a basic knowledge of Chi-
go's offense, Kipke has coached
estover to call signals so that
Lchigan may have a sustained
ive in the Chicago game.
Kicking Stressed.
Kicking and passing was stressed
the workout last night. Gold-
iith and LaJeunesse did-the kick-
g-off while Jack Heston did most
the punting. The point after
uchdown may be 'converted by
tJeunesse, Newman, or Everhard-
. Hozer, being out of the game,
th an injured ankle, will not be
e kicker. While Petoskey is in the
me he might boot the extra point
he scored four out of four at-
npts last Saturday.
Iessmer will not see service, be-
g forced out by a weak back while
nwman is bothered with his old
kle injury. Samuels limped
:und the field yesterday but he
11 start at right tackle as usual.
Fundamentals were stressed again
the practice. Blocking by the1
ds and halfbacks and a half-
am scrimmage between two linesl
ve the players additional prac-
e.
1 T Y ' C' G A I k g
of Value
We Present Michigan
Michigan
Model
Suits
FOR
FALL
With two
trousers
$29.50
$34.50
$39.50
$4490

I

Three Backs May Be Out as
Game Opens io-nrrow.

By Sheldon C. Fullerton
Chicago's footbai sound, with ole
of its star backs on the injurel lisp
:nd two others facing ineligibility,
.IP cntrain for Ann Arbor this
. fftsrnoon with full intentions of
Qivinq Coach Amos Alonzo Stagg a'
victory in the first Conference game;
in his 40th year of active coaching
at the Midway institution.
The game tomorrow will be
the 29th clash between Michi.
gan and Chicago, and the Ma-
roons will be trying for their
seventh victory of the series.
This year, however, they face
almost insurmountable odds,
cven though the Michigan team
i; being groomed to expect
plenty of surprises from the
team that Stagg will put on the
fiead.
Paul Stagg, son of the veteran
mentor, has been on the injured list
for the last two weeks, and is a
doubtful starter. He will, however,
almost surelyvbreak into the game
before it is over. Lou Kanne and
Pat Page, Jr., both have been ay-
ing scholastic difficulties, with the
results of their final examinations
due todbe issued either late last
night or today.
'Considerable i n t e r e s t has
been aroused over the type of
offense that Stagg will use
(Continued on Page 7)

A Cyclone lead by Coach George
Veenker in his new role as head
fbotball coach at Iowa State college
will run into the Titans of Coach
Gus Drais under the lights at the
U. of D. stadium tonight in what
will be the first Michigan appear-
ance of the former Wolverine bas-
ketball coach since he left here last
spring.
For a decade, in fact, ever since,
he started coaching in the Indiana
high schools and later in 1926 when,
ae came to Michigan as coach of
he backfield candidates, Veenker
has had but one paramount ambi-
tion-to coach a college football
team. He was not even satisfied
when he lead the Wolverine basket-
ball team to a Conferenee title dur-
ing his first year as head coach. He
achieved this ambition last spring'
when Ames called him out to the
Corn Belt to take over the desti-
nies of its gridiron history, a history
unblemished by a single victory in
the past two years.
Veenker, however, took a chance,
and thus far this fall the Cyclones
have blown through two teams,
something that has become a nov-
elty at the institution during the
oa'st two years. Morningside and
Simpson have fallen before the
Michigan style of offensive with the
short kick formations which Veen-
ker is said to have instituted at'
Ames.
Veenker's real test, however, will
come tonight at Detroit and if the'
Cyclones are at their best they may
surprise. Dorais' crippled team with
a Michigan offense that may be just
as good as the Titan Notre Dame
shift plays. Although Iowa State is'

CARH 0S ILE ", -dlM'AGKS N ,
Si rior Pit' iing Eves Street
Edge Connie $tilt tanks on
GroVe ahd Ernshaw.
Whether or not the Philadelphia
Athletics, defending their title will
be able to overcome the first true
opposition they have encountered
in three seasons is debatable. The
White Elephants will go on the
field at St. Louis this afternoon, for
the first time in three seasons in
a dangerous position. They must
win the two remaining games from
the Cardinals in the latter's field
and they viill face at least one pit--
cher who has previously foiled
them.
The Red Birds ate in an enviable
position. They can send young
Paul Derringer to the mound this
afternoon and still have Burleigh
Grimes, who pitched so magnifi-
cently on Monday, ready for relief
or to start if the occasion requires
on Saturday.
Much of the American League
club's success depencTs on Lefty
Bob Grove, who although he has
been quite soundly hit on both ap-
pearances, managed to down the
Cards in the series opener, before
bowing to Grimes on Wednesday.
The veteran southpaw will un-
doubtedly pitch today's game, and
he is about due to registe- the
form which carried him to the
head of the American League pit-
ching records this season. He is
however greatly handicapped by
an injured finger.

given very little chance to beat the
Titans, they will be no pushover, for
the former Michigan nrientor has
that knack of inspiring his teams
to fight to the last ditch.
Coach Dorais is taking no enances
on a setback and is planning on
starting his first-string backfield
with Parsaca and Berg at the
halves, McCracken at quarter and
Sullivan who has recovered from
his shoulder injury will be in the
fullback berth.
Identification cards will be com-
pulsory for admittance to the foot-
ball games this year. If our card'
is like last year's was we shan't be
able to see ANY games this year.

h . _ ..,. .,
- - --

I. e. e c ~ rrwr r.Nw.i

,JAC' K MANDERS 27Z nsoza
Ass6dated Press.Photo.
When Minnesota and Stanford tangle these men are going to be
watched. Coast observers say that Phil Moffat is probably the most
versatile back in the west; while My Uhl, triple threat man, and Jack
Manders, plunging fullback are the big guns for the Gophers.

El

FOR YOUR NEXT PARTY

The element of surprise has brought many an ordinary bridge luncheon
to a delightfully different close.
Individual chocolate, pumpkin or fruit' pies, made with rich ice cream
crusts, filled with fruit and topped with whipped cream, will delight your
guests.

KEN LUNDGUIST'S
ORCHESTRA

Special this week:

Melba Fruit Salad
Chocolate Delight
Caramel Pecan

SMALLEST PLAYER

PURDUE'S FOREIGNERS

Sparky Adamk of the Cardinals is
the smallest player in the big
leagues. He is four and a half inches
above five feet, and weights 150
pounds.

Purdue's football team is cosmo-
politan. Sammy Voinoff was born in
Bulgaria, and Fritz Febel is a native
of Germany.

I

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920 Lincoln Ave.

Phone 9588

Phone 22553

436 Third Street

"Ann Arbor's Best Ice Cream"

A- .,

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m

a

Hand
Crafted

)f the finest 'of fabrics, and de-
igned by Mr. Del Prete for 25 years
tailor at Michigan. If you are
ard to fit see our tailor made suits,
29.50.
WERCOATS - Blue and
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Featured at $29.50
THE COLLEGIAN

i 0
We Cannot say Enough in
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For here is a topcoat as iensly
smart as it is practical-Long and very
gracefully draped-Loosely comfort-
able-Doube breasted and ful belted.
CHICAGO-MICHIGAN GAME

HAS DONE!

ND HOW!' He has begun to grew up... weaned
himself from -the cradle of things collegiate
. . . left to tradition the Rah-Rah ea . . . left it to
fiction and to the talkies, to Tin Pan Alley and the
world outside.
Douglas D. Martin of The Free Press staff feels
the pulse of college life at Michigan-records each
throb in a story that's ALIVE with teeming interest.
And he tells how the college man has changed-from
his rah-rah shouts to his rah-rah shirts.

--and now see
WHAT THE

-

COLLEGE MAN

11

Top
Cat
in
Camel
and
Llama
In all
the most

E =

A Full-Page . Frosh or senior... 'collegian' or
Illustrated Article giate' . .. be sure to read this story with
by Douglas D. Martin revelations of the new order of things.

merely 'colle-
its interesting

II

One of the Many Interesting Features in
SUNDAY'S DETROIT

wanted
shades

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-M a W_ y A I

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