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January 29, 1932 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-29

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10

THE MICHIG'AN DAILY

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LEAGUE PRlESIDEI T'
EPOflRTS PUOLESSI
DURING SEIMESTEl

NATION-WIDE CONTACTS ARE GIVEN
WOMEN LIVING AT MOSHER-JORDANI

Cooperation in All Phases
Activity, Declares Kath-
erine Koch.

of

MARDI GRAS A SUCCESS
Evelyn Neilson to Be in Charge
of Proposed Spring Formal
Dinner Dance.
Satisfaction with the work of the
Women's League this semester in
every respect was expressed yester-
day afternoon by Katherine Koch,
'32, president. New projects were
undertaken successfully, the finan-
cial condition was strengthened,
and the League aim of closer
friendship and cooperation among
the campus was accomplished.
Bazaar Discarded.
The lack of success encountered
last year by the I annual League
bazaar wad counteracted favorably
by the initiation of the Mardi Gras
entertaiment, which was given in
conjunction with the Sophomore
Cabaret. The substitute was much
Cmore'successful financially and as
a means of entertainment.
Instead of the Mardi Gras next
year, however, a formal spring din-
ner dance will be given annually,
starting next spring. Evelyn Neil-
son, '33, has been named chairman.
of the first one, which will be held
sonetime in April;
New Plan Tried.
A new plan of holding open meet-
ings was also introduced this year.
tnstead of the usual evening meet-
ing, with a regular outside speaker,
a joint meeting. of the board of
directors and the board of repre-
sentatives was heldlastmonth, and
it has been decided to hold them
at least, every two months next
semester.
The work-of the social committee,
under the chairmanship of Enid
Lush, '33, was especially commend-
able, according to Miss Koch, the
monthly teas particularly proving
popular.
The board of representatives, of
which Geraldine Grover, '32, is the
chairnan, has worked in collabora-
tion with Miss Lloyd on the problem
of 8 o'clock week-nights for fresh-
men women,. and Miss Koch feels
that the ruling is better understood
and enforced as a result,.
ui3ciary Successful.
The'judiciary council, under Sal-
lie Ensminger, '32, has striven to
achieve a more friendly and sym-
pathetic policy toward those who
violate League rules, and to make
these rules more familiar to all
women.
"All in all," Miss Koch concluded,
"the semester has been one of pro-
gress, and we are looking forward
to continued success in the next."

Many States Well Represented
by Residents of Large
Dormitory.
By Alice Boter, '33.
Almost every opportunity for cos-
mopolitan contacts is offered to
residents at the University of Mich-
igan Mosher-Jordan dormitories,
one of the largest dormitories for
women in the world. Registered at
the halls -are individuals from
twenty-eight different states in the
union Wilkershire and Windsor, On-
tario, Canada, and an .assistant di-
rector from France.
As is to be expected, the largest
percentage of the 440 residents are
roun cities in Michigan, with 264
representatives. Michigan students
are familiar with the stories of the
early French settlements here and
tell of the beautiful spots and rec-
reational advantages of their state.
Ohio has the second largest rep-
resentation, with thirty-one living
at the halls. They hail from the
corn belt where hog raising pre-
sents the chief form of livelihood.
Pennsylvania students with their
fund of knowledge about steel mills,
coal mining and historic tales of
Philadelphia and Quaker settle-
ments number thirty.
Twenty-three come from New
York state with the cultural ad-_
vantages of being near the great:
metropolis. From the steel mill re-
gions of Indiana have come twelve
students.
Others have come from the corn
belt of Iowa, the blue grass regions
of Kentucky, the winter wheat
belts of Weft Virginia, Missouri,
Kansas and New Jersey; the grain
belt of Illinois; the industrial cen-
ters of Massachusetts; the dairy
lands of Wisconsin; the oil sections
of Texas; the cotton belt of Tenn-
essee and North Carolina; the can-
yon regions of Colorado; the -gov-
ernment centers of Maryland; the
resort meccas of Florida and Cal-,
ifornia; the blackstone valley of
Rhode Island, the semi-arid re-t
gions of Oklahoma and Nebraska;
the diversified farming country of
Connecticut; the mountainous re-
gion of New Hampshire; and the
revolutionary scenes of Delaware.
Since all have come with a var-
iety of experiences, the exchange
of ideas and thoughts is of distinct

gan at the. opening of the univer- which burst into bloom this fall,
sity year in September 1930. The have been tossed on fashion's scrap
two halls, each of which has its heap.
own business office in connection 1 Big puffs and iluffyfruffles are
. things of the past. The frocks which
with the main office of the corn- smart women don after 9 o'clock
bined structures; are named' for these nights are generally as slim
two well-known deans of women of as a willow wand.
the University, Eliza M. Mosher and! Skirts sweep into soft fullness be-
Myra . Jodan.low the knees, but hiplines and
Myra B. Jordan. bodices give the slim silhouette
The halls were constructed under I which ,today's fashionable women
the supervision of the University demand.

Chic Fashions Stress
New S im Silhouette;
Forbid Period Gowns
PARIS, France, Jan. 28. - (AP) -
Roman tic period evening clothes,

cultural and educational value.
Mosher-Jordan Halls were open-
ed formally with receptions last
January, although occupancy be-I

SOCIETY«a

and is the only dormitory on the
campus which was not a gift.1 Money
for the structure w a s raised
through bond issue by the Guard-
ian Trust comp ny of Detroit and
it is expected that the edifice will
pay for itself in twenty-seven years.
The Detroit alumni chapter was
highly instrumental in bringing
about the building of the halls and
presented university authorities
with a gift of $50,000 to complete
purchase of the land.
The rooms of the dormitory have
every modern convenience and the
dining h a11s, cafeterias, living
rooms and sun-rooms on each floor
afford comfort and pleasure for
residents.
Paper Asks Criticism
of University Courses
(1?y aFn Vec' sSer'vh)
MADISON, Wis., Jan. 26.-A plan,
proposed by The Daily Cardinal,
student newspaper at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, that students
make anonymous criticisms of all
courses with popular appeal in or-
der that the professors could im-
prove the course and correct some
of the faults of the University sys-
tem, was lauded highly by members
of the faculty recently.
"It is a'good thing for the stu-
dents to air their opinions," de-
clared Prof. Hulsey Cason of the

An occasional flat bow or flounce
varies the design, but these are sup-
pressed' to blend quietly into the
silhouette.
Colors, too, have taken a new
turn, with silvery pastel shades
leading the night time fashion
parade. ,
Shell pink, ice blue, water green,
pearl grey and silvery white are
worn by the smartest Parisians.
Green Urges Federal
Help for Unemployed
WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.-(A') --
An urgent call for direct federal aid
to the unemployed was sounded to-
night by William Green, president
of the American Federation of
Labor. He estimated the number
out of work at 8,300,000.
"Only one agency-the federal
government-can meet the relief'
problem now that all of the other
resources have proved inadequate,"
he said in a formal statement. "By
taxation it can distribue the bur-
den of this year where it can be
borne with least inquiry to our
citizenship."
One Day Offer
MILLINERY

Delta Zeta.
Miss Esther Blackman of Gold-
water, Mich., former student of the
University of Michigan was a house
guest at the Delta Zeta house last
week-end. Miss Shirley King, of
Detroit, Michigan, alumnae rhem-
ber was also a house guest from
Friday to Sunday.
Gamma Phi Beta.
Gamma Phi Beta is entertaining
as house guest this week, Mrs. L. C.
Diehl of Midland, Michigan. Miss
Marjorie Burdette, of Chicago, Il-
linois, was a guest at the chapter
house last week-end.
Kappa Delta.
Miss Dorothy Pape and Miss Mar-
jorie Howey, former University of
M i c h i g a n students, of Detroit,
Michigan, were the guests last
week-end of the Misses Ann and
Alice Reek at the Kappa Delta
house.
Mosher Jordan.
Wednesday evening Mosher Jor-
dan halls held a semi-formal birth-
day dinner in honor of all thosel
students whose birthdays come
during the school year. Red tapers
II P man' s I

centered the dinner tables and on
each individual birthday c a k e
which was served, one to each wo-
man, there was a small red candle.
Yesterday after noon the resi-
dents of Jordan hall entertained
at one of the series- of regular1
weekly Mosher Jordan teas.
Miss Helen Bradley, social direc-
tor of Couzens hall, and Ruth
Child, graduate resident of the hall
poured. The student hostesses in
attendance were Goldia Lightfoot,
'33Ed., and Margaret William,'32Ed.
The women who assisted in serv-
ing at the tea were Stella Glass,
'35, Eleanor M. Beers, '34, Helen
Black, '33SM, Margaret Burke,
'33SM, Mary Brimijoin, '34, Mary-
Kathryn Snyder, '35, Ruth Lat-
chaw,'34, Carolyn Trueblood, '35,.
Harriette White, '34, Mary Earn-
Hshaw, '34, and Esther Thompson,
'32.
Four-H club girls and fariM wo-
men of Talladega county, Ala.,
earned $44,378 during 1931 from'

SENIOR WIL L G
REITL ATLE
Kate Field, Vocalist, to Pt
Program Today at Lyd
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Kate Keith Field, a senior i
voice departmient of te 5~ch
v i e d p r m n of t e ShMusic, will give a recital F
afternoon, Jan. 29, at 4:15 o
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Th
She will be accompanied by ]
Nelson, Grad. SM.
The program which she wil
sent will be as follows: An'
mia Bella, Caccini; Gia it so]
gange, A. Scarlatti; Ui verde
ticello senza piante, Jo dei sal
ne mando mille, Etanto c'e p
ch'io ti lasci, and O si che no
pevo sospirare Wolf-Ferrari; E
Lia, Debussy; Widmung and
desgesprach, Schumann; Ma
mit dem roten Mundchen, I
Sountag, O musst 'ich doel
weg zuruck, Botschraft, Br:
Searching For Lambs, When
Art Dead, Goossens; Things
]her, Now in These Fairy
H olst; Spring Sorrow, Blow,
Thou Winter Wind, Quilter.

I I

Ltheirprojects.

217 South Main Street
CLEARANCE

TRADE IN YOUR OLD FUR COAT
FOR A NEW ONE
At this 'time we are able to offer you a most unusua
allowance for your old fur coat towards the purchase
of a new 1932 model.
{ N
BUY werdlings

SALE

OF

department of psychology.

S neMaHOES
All Winter Materials

Ohl

If

a

MONTH-END
CLEARANCE

Its Hight Time To Buy When You Can Find For Coats
In The Season's Newest Style For Only
Every one a smart 1932 fashion/Convenient Terms
Lowest prices on all Fur repairs and
cleansing.
ESTABLISHED 1904 217 E. L'BETY ST.

3.57 5

Finery
Coral dad

11

Hole-proof Hosiery
Chiffon and Service
Regular $1.00 Hose at

Suedes
Velvets

69c

Begin ar $7.50 1Mod el s
Introducing the NEW, Very
Young, Very Saucy, ;Very Chic
SPRING STRAWS in any style
desired-DULL or GLOSSY .
to be word a the provocative
1932 angle.
MADE ON THE HEAD
The Bv
715 North University

$2.95

Combinations

k 27 years of unex°celled value and service

/'

Hosiery
Chiffon &'Service
All sizes and shades
TEiE
LAURA BELLE SHOP
State at Liberty

Friday and Saturday only
CAMPUS LINGERIE
& HOSIERY SHOPPE
at Liberty Street
229 South State Street

Sizes
3 to 8
AAA to C
217 South

Values
to
$6.00

Main Street

The Gowns for

f- U I __

WANT ADS PAY

SUPERIOR
MILK and ICE CREAM
2-Layer, Brick
Vanilla and Chocolate and Malted

PUNCHES-FANCY MOLDS

N

Phone 23181

t ;R
Ev'r
~y
j
HasThis,
Supressed
Desire
Down deep in every college girl's heart is a secret yearning
to dash out and just once have a wild orgy of' buying clothes-
about 49 dresses and 67 wraps and 1,000 stockings and-and
-for once to have enough to wear!
For college girls need lots of clothes-sprightly clothes, good
clothes, gently priced clothes! Three adjectives' that don't
often bear fruit in the same shop. That's why you so often
hear the gayly garbed girls about the campus say,
"I got it at Goodyear's College Shop."
f3 /~TV\T'\1T' A T~ 1

SPECIAL GROUPS-

at $10, $12, $16.75

Last Spring you would have paid double for equal

Spring

Strike a responsive chord-
And no wonder.
Styles are novel and striking.
Prices Unbelievably low.

.s-

I/

SMART NEW PRINTS
CREPES IN SPRING COLORS
COPIES OF PARISIAN MODELS
FOR STREET WEAR
FOR BRIDGE PARTIES
VOR ALL OCCASIONS

tN1 TiUYfl
DS f I'VI" l
:~fA ( iUNf~

Never have values been equalled.

.

Never has your dollar gone so far.

7

i 1777M ) a JS _ LE

I ~ ~-i~- I~

5 - 1i

.a
'

Ofcourse-you hcove
heard-uoul" lbem,reod
4aboul Ien? and have,
wished fora cI~pse o
(ten. hey arerow iu
' 7e Collins Jkqp
'awaiiinq I your"'
er~ustastkc apprroval

,-
,,

i
t
i_
t i
f }
f; ,

An Outstanding variety of the latest models.
Priced Specially at $9.85 and $12
(Regularly were $12 to $17.85)

FORMALS FOR "J-HOP"

BLACK-GOLD-MAIZE-EGGSHELL-WHITE
PERSIAN-PEACH-BLUE

.

I

fl, ut°i on wc.
_..- - c
. f r-- i

1 11

r

GOTHAM HOSE FOR ALL OCCASION
All the new shades as they appear in New York.
Greatly Reduced Prices.
Al nn 1tI5_1I-

II

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