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January 26, 1932 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-26

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M 11"' C. A -N

%T)AI L I

TUESAY, J.

LaU1L Y ~~'11 Z 1Y1 1f 1TC1. A- u nPiAT1 a

l1reirt~t £tlitai td

ibiiwhed every morning except Mondy daring the Unf'rturlty fyear
Board in Control of Student Publications.
mber of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
to Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use ~for re-{
tion of all news dispat es credited to it or not otherwa i
d in this paper and the local news published herein.
tered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as aecond
Matter. Special rate of postage grante4. by Third Assistant
bster benerarl
baription by carrier, $4.00; by quail, $4,54

Ana Arbor ,ress Buiding,Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Phones: EditorWa,_ 4925; Business, 21214.

-1-k-

ZOITORIAL STAFF
telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ditor RICHARD L. TOBINCaloryh
dltor .. . .. . . . . .. ..... ..,.. .Carl Forsythe
a Directnr .............................B*ach Conger, Jr.
Ed'tor............. ............David M. Nichol
Editor .........;..... .............Sheldon C. Fuerton
's Editor ...M................margaret M. Thompson
nt News Editor.......,....................Robert L. Pierce

collegiate circles to bring members of different faiths
and different races closer together was the recent
formation of an Inter-Faith Council at New York
University, to promote closer cooperation among Jew-
ish, Protestant, and Catholic student religious organ-
izations. The council was established by represent-
atives of each religious sect.
Perhaps this action is sort of an indicator point-
ing to the fact that religious differences are of far
less importance than is generally conceded by the
averageArun of contemporary bigots. Religious intol-
emnce is one of the most futile, and yet one of the
most prevalent attitudes which characterize the hu-
man species. The average man, although he may be
ever so firm in his religious convictions, follows a
particular creed chiefly because he was reared in a
family of the same or similar religious beliefs. Which
is right? Each group has evidence to support its
contentions, and each believes in the teachings to
which it adheres just as ardently as does the other.
Rather than holding themselves aloof because of
situations of which they are really not in control,
New York- students have done a wise thing in band-
ing together for the good of the entirety. The gesture
will not only boom tolerance, of which there is re-
markably little despite the fact that all races pride
themselves on it, but its cultural and educational ad-
vantages are many.
There is a great deal that is good and desirable in
every creed. This amalgamation, without the sacri-
fice of personal beliefs and individual practices, will
do a great deal toward a more thorough and complete
understanding among students, and even peoples, if
carried out on a more extensive basis. None of us
are .so perfect that segregation from our contempor-
aries will help maintain any self-styled perfection we
may harbor.y
r .~~~~ ~~~ m *Ir
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B. Gilbreth
A. Goodrian
Karl rielefert

NIGHT EDTOF
J. Culien Kewii

IRS
dyci James higis
Jerry E. Rosenshal
George A. Stauter

J. Myers
oueO.

Sports Assistant
?7n We Thomas

REPORTERS
igh W. Arnheim red A. Huber
1n B. 3ecler Norman Krat
d C. Campbell Roland Martin
lilis Carpenter Henry Meyer
as Connellan Albert H. Ne-mart
ce n1yden E Jerome Pettit
y Brockman Georgia Geismwan
a Carver Alice Gilbert
ce Collins. Martha Littleton
e Crandall Elizabeth lon g
Feldman Frances Mnichester
ice Foster Eiizabth Mann

f

f - 1

John S. Townsend
Charies A. Sanford
Jon W. Pritchard
Joseph lRenihan
C. Hart Schaaf
Braekley Shaw
Parker R. Snyder
G. R. Winters
Margaret O'Brien
Hlillary 1Rardtrn
Dorothy Rundell
Elma Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhamn

BUSINESS STAFF
Thlcphone 21214

S T. Kilne
P. JOHNSON

. .. ......... .. . .... .... 1fs Sine l
. .. ............. .Assistant
Department Managers

ig. ............. ..............Vernon Pisvp
ng Cfontractsa..................arry ft. ljc, ic'y
og Service....... ...................1yron C. Vedder
ns ..............................WiliamiT.Brhown
B..g ..................Richard Strateeir
Business Manager... ..................:Ann W. Verner

Assistants
SuJohn Keyser -
riley Arthur F. Rohn
Janice Lowe
r Anne Harsh&
Oissel Katharine Jackson
d Dorothy Layin
grund Virginia McComnb
r Carolin Mosher'
n Helen Olsen'

Grafton W. Sharp)
Donato A. Johuston XI
Don Lyon
Bernard H. Good
May Seetried
Minnie Song.
Helen Spencer
Kathryn Stork
Clare Ung e
Mary Eliz'abeth Watt.

AT THE MICHIGAN
A picture without even one poorly played part is
such an extremely unusual experience that "Strictly
Dishonorable," in which Paul Lukas, . Sidney Fox,
Lewis Stone, George Meeker, William Ricciardi, and
Sidney Toler all do capital performances, automatic-
ally comes under the head of first-class entertain-
ment even without the story that kept this show on
Broadway for an exceptional run.
Although the cast is not listed as "All-Star" and
the actors, with the exception of Lukas and Stone,
are virtually unknown, there is a greater gross total
of talent in this show than in any three average pro-
ductions. The story of the little southern gal who
comes north to find happiness with the boy from
Jersey and finally gets it with the man-of-the-world
opera star is well known. --K. S.
CANPUS OPlNlON

__....

k

NIGHT EDITOR}-KARL SEIFFERT
TUESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1932

t
music ;
THE DETROIT SYMPHONY
A Review by William J. Gorman
Rudolph Siegel chose to make his
Ann Arbor debut in a popular pro-
gram-a program in which the is-
ue would be not so much the qua-
ity of his sensibility as the extent
of his virtuosity. This type of de-
cision-so frequently made by guest
conductors-seems unfortunate. A
guest can hardly be expected to at -
tain to the knowledge of and con-
trol over the Detroit Symphony
that Mr. Gabrilowitsch has worked
so long for. Yet these are the con-
ditions of virtuosity. Without them,
there doesn't seem much validity in
playing, Berlioz' extravagantly ro-
mantic episode in the life of an
artist who was so smitten with an
Irish 'Juliet' playing at-the Odeon
that he chokingly confessed to a
friend: "An iron hand clutches my
heart; I am lost." One doesn't
have to be a very subtle conductor
to correctly apprehend the nature
and meaning of all the romantic
paraphernalia of the B e r 1 ioz-
Smithson affair: dreams and pois-
onous passions, the glory and tu-.
mult of the ball, escape into pas-
toral simplicity, horrors of the scaf-
fold, and Walpurgisnacht. One does
have to be as magnificent a virtu-
oso of the orchestra as, say, Mr.
Koussevitsky, to really project this
romantic drama as it should be:
with full justice done and full cer-
tainty given to the very brilliant
orchestral writing.,
The reaction of the audience was
judgment enough. It would have
gobbled up a reading by Mr. Kous-
sevitsky. It was for the most part
indifferent to Mr. Siegel's. Being
guest conductor, his performance
o it was nearly destined to be med-,
iocre. It was. One had difficulty in
surviving the third movement. "In
the Fields." It is rather too long
anyway. But Mr. Siegel had faith
in its lyricism and took it very
slowly indeed. He was not able to
command enough fervour and body
from the strings to justify this
faith; and the movement several
times threatened to fall to pieces.
The reading of the first movement
seemed too warm and sentimental,
not foreboding enough. Berlioz's
program note reads: "A young
musician of morbid sensibility and
ardent imagination poisons him-
self with opum in a fit of amorous
despair." The young musician's
ireams, and passions were not read
with enough poison. The other
t h r e e movements - well-written
program pieces - came from Mr.
Siegel's hand with a certain degree
of power and certainty. Mr. Ga-
brilowitsch would undoubtedly play
them better, however. The obvious
point folldws, them: since Mr. Sie-
gel is a German large-village con-
ductor, we would have been more
interested in his thinking about
anyone of the Brahm's scores (with
allowance made for technical un-
certainty) than in his medicare
performance of a score which tends
to collapse if there is any techni-
cal uncertainty.
The latter half of the program
had two conductor-proof pieces.
;Til Eulienspiegel" is p e r h a p s
Strauss' best score. It is a swift
drama, not pausing too much on
any incident, set forth, as Debussy
said of it, "with prodigious surety
of orchestration." The reading was
good, the only uncertainty com-
ing in the transitions from one
rhythm to the next (one event to

the next).
Despite all the exploitation of it
in the past year, Ravel's excellent
trick has held up pretty well. Even
Sin the clumsy, not 4t all sharp or
precise, reading given it last night,
. it makes the majority of us nervous
and fidgety-which'is all it wants
_to do. Even if the thrill of the cres-
cendo has worn off, it is still a mar-
vellous textbook on instrumenta-
Ption.

MUSICAL
EVENTS

All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given
without admission charge.
PERCY SCHOLES of London,
University Lecture, "British
Contributions to M74usic," Men-
dClsohn Theatre, Tuesday, Jan-
vary 26, -4:15.
DR. SIGFRID KARG-ELERT,
Guest Organist, January 27,
4:15.
KATE KEITH FIELD, Soprano,
January 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Pianist,
Januarv 31, 4:15.
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist,
February 4, 8:15.
THELMA LEWIS, Soprano, Feb..
ruary 14, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
WARREN ALLEN, Guest Organ-
ist, February 10, 4:15.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Harnns Pick, Violonlcellist, Was.
sily Besekirsky,'Violinist, Joseph
Brinkman, Pianist, February 7,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
PERCY GRAINGER, Pianist,
February 19, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Vio-
linist, MABEL ROSS. RHEAD,
Pianist, in Sonata Recital, Feb-
ruary 21, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P HON Y
/ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, February 25,
4:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
Febrauary 28, 4:15.
CHARLOTTE L O C K W O:OD,
Guest Organist, March 2, 4:15.
LOUISE CUYLER, Violinist, and
MAUD. OKKELBERG, Pianist,
in Sonata .Recital,March 6,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano,
March 7, 8:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Viol on-
cellfist, in Sonata Recital, March
13, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
UNIVERSITY AY MP H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violoncellist, April 3,
4:15.
NELL B. STOCKWELL,. Pianist,
April 24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, in Organ
Recital, every Wednesday at
4:15 unless otlerwise announ-
ced.

LABORATORY
SUPPLIES
CHEMICALS
DRUG
SPECIALTIES
SUNDRIES

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SON, co.

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200-202 E, LIBERY ST.

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ESTABLISHED 1843

DRUGS

THIS WEEK

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SUBlSCRIBE~ TO T4'MICHIGA

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"PERSONALSTATI+QERY"
6U Sheets and 50 Enes
$1.00
STUDEN.TS ,lskP LY STYE
1111 South University Avenue

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UUTCH, SAf,
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SBusiness
ersus Tradition

HE hearts of local politicians should have . Letters published in this column should not he construed as
warmed at the editorial entitled "The High expressing the editorial opinion of The Daily. Anonymous
con,, . ". munications will b disregaarded. The iines of colmminicants
ice of Dance Tickets, -which we reprin ted a will, however, be regarded as confidential upon request. Contrib-
,ek ago Sunday from the Daily Illini. Either iutors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than Soo
.words if possible.
at, or else overflowed with pity for their Illi-
is cohorts. For this editorial objected stren- License Bootleggers, Suggests Levi
usly to the exorbitant price of $3.50 for the
nual military ball, one of the major social To The Editor:
nctions at Champaign. As a result, the price That there are vastly more important problems
rme down to three dollars. today than prohibition is clear to anyone who keep,
The carefully itemized account should lhe in touch with what is happening not only in the
refully studied by dance committees at Micli- United States but also all over the world. Among
an with a view to cuttimg down the expensesU-g
tlieir own functions. The total business these are the following-to mention but a few: un-
:nsacted amounted to a itile over $'OO, employment, the business depression, and the fight
iI 1our 1J-Hop runs upward to $5,i00. hi against a new cataclysm through war. But since
Isis for attendance is approximatelv the the ball is kept rolling by both the pros and antis, it
ie, being 675 at Illinois and 700 here. is well enough to make use of the freedom of the
Frankly speaki ng, the J-Ilop was 1i uch press to indulge a little more in opinions, even at the
ore enjoyable avid a more promlinent social risk of their leading to nothing.' The antis know and
gent whl~ci it wzas in the hands of the t1ia1a the pros,,ought to know that prohibition or no prohi-
IM group. Now it more or less reseiles a bitin; thereis no difficulty in satisfying one's thirst
ob-scene. 'Ile same nilgi h 1e said of olier for liquor if one is inclined to indulge. All one has
ass dances. Apparently ile necessiiy of iak. to do according to the mbst reliable authorities, is
g the affairs financial successes for the beiie- to call the bootlegger and he will do the rest. Those
of tle class treasury has dictated a poliev who doubt the truth of this statement are ostrich-
granting admission to as many cou ples as minded. Having lost confidence in me and damning
n be crowded into the ballrooni, regardless me-brotherly love!-for being an anti, the pros will
cl asses'. not believe that until now I have not made use of a
Class functiols 1would be mu3Lch more plea- bootlegger. How soon I shall make use of one, I am
tt affairs to attend were they administerel not prepared to say at this juncture. Anyhow the
the tradition of being exclusively class name of my, purveyor shall never become known.
nces. To be sure, this year's J-Hop c1ommit- And if the United States should prove too dry for
e has obtained wvhat is probably the outstand- my constitution, I may spend the rest of my life in
g dance orchestra in the United States. Yet Finland.-
C Wonder how soonii big business will overtake In a recent correspon4ence between two former
d sw'allow tradition Yale men, one of the writers is horrified at the idea

CAL.KINS -FLETQER'-

We have

DRUG 0C.
served Michigan and her sy nts
3 Dependa e t l

for 45 years

CALNDY

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Proper

Tre'atment

of Your Clothes

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EIITORL AL CO ET

i

THE COLLEGE MYTH T
(Indiana Daily Student)1
"The college student is in a class by himself so
ar as popular portrayal goes. He is characterized as1
a more or less indolent individual, but he is immense-
y popular with the American public," says a con-
emporary, speaking editorially, and the same writer
continues by advising college students to preservel
he illusion.
The college student no doubt is popular with the
eneral public-but it is the sort of superior interest;
which a crowd shows in a circus clown. College stu-
dents are all very well as long as their escapades
furnish a slightly salty tang for the conversation
over the tea cups. But when it is suggested that one
:ome into closer touch with them-well, the public
gets just a bit panic-stricken.
Such, at least, has been the public's attitude
toward college students in the past. And when the
same students went out to apply for jobs and places
of responsibility, the employer all too often remem-
bered specimens of crooning whoopee boys he had
seen on the screen and read about in books. As a
result the college student did not get the job.
Tt is all very well for the colleges to renresent that

that the present men of that institution ask for beer
whereas the other states that beer-not hard liquor-
is the beverage the students want. The final letter
by the gentleman who favors beer reads as follows:
"The Yale men that I know do not need the Cannons
McBrides, Andersons, or any of the prohibition rac-
keteers, to instruct them as to their manner of con-
duct."
As a matter of fact it seems that the drys ar
better qrganized than the wets especially since the
archbishop James Cannon, Jr., is a shrewd politician
However, "his Grace has so many +private troubles
chiefly due to his weakness for games of chance, that
his attention is divided, and the full horsepower of
.his talent cannot be brought to bear upon his job. Th(
other dry kleagles and wizards-McBride, Wilson
Poling and so on-are plainly only fifth-raters. I1
would be quite easy, given competent wet leadership
to set them into fatal tailspins. They were sent dowx
to earth by Yahweh to complete Hill's work.of mak,
ing prohibition a joke."
I subjoin an opinion on the subject from the
American Mercury, February, 1932: "As Abrahar
Lincoln long ago observed, a country cannot be ha
free and half slave. What is needed is a liberatio:
that will liberate every citizen of the Republic, wheth
er-his home be in New York city or in some remot
hamlet. Prohibition is either a great moral reforrr
as Lord Hoover says, or it is something far too vil
to be compromised with. Every honest wet believe
that it is the latter. Ergo, he cannot in decenv hu

is as ipiportant a eature of the Varsity's
laundering serv ce as thorough washing.
In sending your clothes to the Varsity You
are assured of their return to yqu in pp9rfe

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GUEST ORGANIST
Dr. Sigfrid Karg-Elert, Professor
of Composition at the Leipzig Con-
servatory of Music, will appear as
guest organist at the regular Twi-
light Recitals, Wednesday after-
noon, January 27, at 4:15 o'clock
in Hill Auditorium, taking the place
of Palmer Christian.
For more than twenty years the
name of this distinguished com-
poser has appeared with increas-
ing frequency on recital programs,
everywhere and now his works are
perhaps more frequently played by
organists than those of any other
contemporary composer. The pro-
gram follows:
Suite Bretonique (F sharp minor)
-Cesar Franck (1822-1890). Fan-
fare, Paysage, Cortege.
nniipn 77.inor rmnnan n,nrttiP.

Phone 23123

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For Call and Delivery Serv

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