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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 22, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HTGAN DATTY

Published every inor ing except Monday during the University year
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
lited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as eecond
? matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
itaster General..
Suhscription by carrier, $4.00; br mail, $4.55
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Ligan. Phoney: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STVAFF
Telephone 4925

was, by the way, copied from the younger high school
brethern.
Mr. Daily, we of the Optimist hereby institute and
ordain that on the fifth day of the second month of
the year 1932, we shall inaugurate our so-called
sponge week in full accordance with previously laid
plans.
If it were possible, Mr. Daily, we would invite you
to our school party on the fifth day of February and
let you see for yourself.
Well, Goom by, boys, see if you can start some-
thing like this. The Optimist Staff,
Ann Arbor High School.

Answers "One of The 1600"

MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBIN
Editor ........ .......................
Corlal Director....................3.........
is Ettor......... ..... . ...... ......
te Edtor................. .S)
men's Editor. .....................Mri
stont News Editor.............. . .....

t

SB. Gilbreth -A
ad A.rgoodrran
Karl 6&.lrertt

NIGHT EDITORS
Culien Kennedy

r

George A

r J. Myers
uJones

ey W. Arnhelin
n E. fleekor
dr C. Camtpb ell
iiiaims Carpenter
as Connieliau

Sports Assistants
John W. Thomas
REPORTERS
Fred A. Huber
Nornan Kraft
7oland Martin
lbenry' Meyer
A 't 11. Newman
E. Jerome P'ettit,
Georgia Geismian
Alice GIbert
1M i, ha Littleton
lizabeth a tLong
Frances Maanchester
E'Iizabeth Mann

N

John
,ose
tC. Ii
13ra1
Marj
lillar
l)orol
Elnia
Josef

.by Brockman
'm Carver
ice Colins
e rndalL
Feldman
mce Fostef

To The Editor:
.....Car; Forsythe In reply to "one of the 1600" non-preference stu-
.. eaavi on gichor dents who also happens to be one of the 7600 non-
chur~hgoing students, may one of the "properly paid
hheldon C. Fullerton enthusiasts" (few ministers are overpaid) point out
garet U.Thompson
. .Robert L. Pierce the following:
(1) There are few hypocrites in the church to-
James Inglis day. They cannot withstand the criticism of the
. eutr osenthal skeptics, both within and without the church.
(2) Fear is not primary in religion today. Rather,
John S. Townsend the goal of a complete life is stressed and "living
Charles A. Sanfora cleanly" is the first step toward it.
SW. Pritchard (3) Churches are not to blame for "hate, preju-
,ph. Pihar d dice, wars, suspicion and misunderstanding," but are
ph Scnhaan
k y shaow one of the most powerful forces in modern life to
cer R. Snyder dissipate these.
R. Wintern Fifty-thr ee per cent of 19,000 ministers who re-
garet O'Brien plied to a randompolbthWrdTmrowsae
ary RardenppolbthWolToorwsae
thy Rpudell that they would support no future war.
aWadsworth . *
phine Woodhams The present series of lectures on the campus of
the League for Industrial Democracy could not have
been held without the efforts of church student
.'Business Manager groups and their willingness to guarantee the ticket
.Assistant Manager sale.
(4) "Reason and understanding," the new gods,
....Vernon Bishop were developed by religion as it sought to help man
..arry IL. Begley
.Byron C. Vedder unravel his inner experience and alter his environ-
Vciliamr T. Brown m Jent. The word "understanding" atd its derivatives
Dichard Strateni
...Ann W. Verner occurs 260 times in the old and new testaments.
You may "care nothing at all for religion" but
ton w. Sharp those in religious work care for you and believe that
yo modern religion has a contribution to make to mod-
ard 1. Good ern man. Also, that the scientific method should be
Seefried applied to emotions as well as to reason.
ie Seng
Spencer H. P. Marley,
rn Sgtork XPresident, Council of Rel gion.
Elizabeth Watts.

roF. L.C. Karpinski
(Editor's note: This is the sixth
of a series of articles on outstand-
ing members of the University fac-1
ulty. Another in the series will ap-
pear next week. The information
published in each case is furnished
by colleagues and friends of the
subject, not by the individual con,
cerned in the article.)
By E. Jeromo Pettit
Many leading pedagogues in cer-
tain departments have been con-
cerned for so long a time with the
subject of their labors that their
experience may be noted by certain
characteristics of speech. The po-
litical scientists often refer to or-
ganized societies as "govments",
a n d astronomers sometimes call
our planet "thworld."
So when Prof. Louis C. Karpin-
ski, of the department of mathe-
matics, refers to the teaching of
"mattimatics" we subconsciously
decide that he is one individual
who is perfectly worthy of calling
his profession by ahr nickname.
For, aside from his remarkable

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1)orothy Lnyin
Virginia McComb
C(rulin Mosher
Helen Olsen

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NIGHT EDITOR-FRANK B. GILBRETH
FRIDAY, JANUARY 22, 1932

. .

K i

These New Sweaters

sues and
an didates

A S has been the custom in every presidential
year, the winter book of candidates is rapidly
becoming larger. Already President Hoover has
been announced as a candidate for re-election in
the Republican party while Gov. Albert C. Ritchie,
of Maryland, has cast his hat in the ring of the
Democratic ranks. Besides these two, everyone is
sure that ^Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, of New
York, and former Gov. Alfred E. Smith will soon
announce their candidacies in the latter party as
probably will Hiram. Johnson, of California, and
Senator France, of 'Maryland, in the Grand Old'
Party's fold.
There are always other possibilities such as
Newton D. Baker, "Alfalfa Bill" Murray, Melvin
D. Traylor and the traditional winter possibility,
William E. Borah.
This year, more than any other in the last
decade, will see considerable excitement connected
with the primaries, conventions and campaigns.
For the first time in ye.ars, issues may really come
to the fore and from all indications a change in
government may take place.
Since, in this year, candidates and issues are
going t'o play such a part, the average person will
have to keep in touch intelligently with national'
politics. It is tradition in the American people to
have their minds made up for them by political
bosses and party rule rather than people's rule has
been the result.
We urge everyone, particularly students, to
know their men and issues, to be able to decide
intelligently. The average college student is class-
ed in the highest ten per cent of the country's
intelligentsia and it is on him that' the responsi-
bility for being able to lead in thought devolved.'
If he, and presumably other leaders are content
to let shrewd and selfish party leaders put things
over on them, there is no wondersthat government
becomes merely a subject for criticism and investi-
gation.
It will be interesting to view the developments
in the political world these next ten months. The
band wagon will really begin to move soon and
let us hope that the people will be leading it rather
than following, doing a dance to someone else's
tune.

andl RAJA
"ONCE IN A LIFETIME" REMAINS SECOND WEEK
AT DETROIT CIVIC THEATRE
"Once in a Lifetime" will be continued for a sec-
ond week at the Detroit Civic Theatre beginning
Monday night, Jan. 25 and closing Sunday night,
Jan. 31. This very funny satire on Hollywood affairs
when such affairs were at their dizzyest, ran for 305
nights in New York as a sell-out.
The play was written around the experiences
which George S. Kaufman, co-author with Moss Hart
of "Once in a Lifetime" endured in Hollywood. He
suffered the neglect which most New York authors
experience after signing a contract to write for the
talkies. He was completely forgotten for months
Kaufman puts these experiences' into the character
of Lawrence Vail who finally leaves Hollywood for
an asylum.
Then there is a joyous comedy part written around
Luella Parsons,. thinly disguised as Helen Hobart,
which Allyn Gillyn is extracting every ounce of
humor from.
The three actors whose adventures form the theme
of the play, Jerry Hyland, May Daniels and George
Lewis are being played by George Macready, Joan
,Madison and Arthur Davison respectively.
The Detroit Civic Theatre production of "Once in
a Lifetime" is the first production of the comedy in
Detroit, the New York company missing Detroit on
its tour.
Opening next week, Feb. 1, the Civic Theatre will
produce a new comedy by Channing Pollock, "The
Strangle-Hold," at the same time the New York pro-
duction of "The House Beautiful," Pollock's latest
success is running at the Cass Theatre. This makes
a Channing Pollock week in Detroit, with the Civic
Theatre and the Cass Theatre combining to honor
him jointly.
Health EducationHTO
HEALTH PERIODICALS
Health Service .
The University is justified in expecting a student
to grow in his ability to appraise properly what he
hears concerning health and disease. This is no
easy task. Formerly it was impossible due to the
mystery in which all medical things were hidden.
Now it is difficult because there is such a wealth of
contradictory information about health and disease
broadcast by newspapers, magazines and radio.
There are, however, certain publications which
have behind them the reputations of organizations
whose first interest is the dissemination of reliable
information. If contradictions appear, it is because
man is always learning something about himself and
it takes time for new knowledge to become common.
The following publications are written to be un-
derstood by a non-medical reader. They are avail-
able in the Medical Reading Room of the general
library and are recommended to the student who
wants to follow the trends' in study of health and
disease. A very complete collection of books in this
field is ,open to students during the afternoons anc
Saturday mornings at Room 133*W. Medical building.
Hygeia-Published by the American Medical As-
sociation.
Journal of Outdoor Life-Published by the Na-
tional Tuberculosis Association.
Journal of Health and Physical Education-Pub-
lished by the National Physical Education Associa-
tion.
Mental Hygiene-By The National Committee on
Mental Hygiene.
Good Health-By the Battle Creek Sanitarium.
Hospital Social Service-By the Hospital Social
Service Association of New York.
Michigan Public Health-State Department of

Prof. L. C. Karpinski.
record as a member of the faculty
of the University, his election as
one of the four American members
of the International Committee of
the History of Science, is enough
in itself to mark him as one of the
historical contributors and at the
;ame time one of the scientific con-
tributors who stand out as promin-
ent today.
Professor Karpinski is also "star-
red" in Cattell's American Men of
Science (an honor given upon the
votes of a scientist's colleagues)
and has been elected to member-
ship in many leading societies.
What he has done for Michigan
seems, at first glance, rather a
strange contribution for a mathe-
matician.
An interest in maps and in the
history of mathematics, growing
out of a hobby of collecting maps
and atlases, has led him to develop,
for the University Libraryj one of
the world's leading collections on
the history of science. Today, only
one other American library, that of
Columbia University, is as well I
equipped in these respects as our
own.
This particular library depart-
ment had an excellent beginning
under the supervision of Prof. W.
W.' Beman and Prof. Alexander
Ziwet, both members of the mathe-
matics department at the time. But
the outstanding, developments haveE
come under the direction of Pro-
fessor Karpinski.
He first came to-Michigan in 1904
to accept a position as instructor
in the department, and became a
professor shortly afterwards.
In 1926, on his sabbatical leave
of absence, he received a buying
commission from the University
Library. So, from Liverpool to Pra-
gue, from Sicily to Copenhagen,
Professor Karpinski searched for
antiquarian books, and, consider-
ing the results, a mighty thorough
search it was too.
For he brought back numerous
precious and rare volumes, bought
at figures which must have left'
most of the European dealers in
tears.
After that first trip he spent his
time on succeeding journeys in the
interests of the University. On one
trip he arranged for the photogra-
phing of more than a thousand
manuscripts and maps relating to
the history of America. Only at one
national archive was he refused
permission to accomplish his de-
sires, at the library in Madrid. On-
ly some five or six maps were con-
cerned in the refusal and he stated
at the time that they would be pro-
cured in the future. Needless to
say, they have been.
Today practically all of the great
American libraries specializing at

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All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given'
without admission .charge.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, January 24,
4:15.
DJETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Dr. Rudolf Siegel,
Guest Conductor, January 25,
8:15.
PERCY SCHOLES of London,
University Lecture, "British
Contributions to Music," Men.
delssohn Theatre, Tuesday, Jan-
uary 26, 4:15. _
DR. SIGFRID KARG-ELERT,
Guest Organist, January 27,
4:15.
KATE KEITH FIELD, Soprano,
January 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MABELeROSS RHEAD, Pianist,
January 31, 4:15.
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist,
February 4, 8:15.
THELMA LEWIS, 'Soprano, Feb-
ruary 14, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
WARREN ALLEN, Guest Organ-
ist, February 10, 4:15.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Hanns Pick, Violoncellist, Was-
sily Besekirsky, Violinist, Joseph
Brinkman, Pianist, February 7,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
PERCY GRAINGER,- Pianist,
February 19, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, tVio-
linist, MABEL ROSS RHEAD,
Pianist, in Sonata Recital, Feb.
ruary 21, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, February 25,
4:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
Febrauary 28, 4:15.
CHARLOTTE L O C K W O O D,
Guest Organist, March 2, 4:15.
LOUISE CUYLER, Violinist, and
MAUD OKKELBERG, Pianist,
in Sonata Recital, March 6,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano,
March 7, 8:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Violon-
cellist, in Sonata Recital, March
13, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
UNIVERSITY SYMP H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat.
tern, Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violoncellist, April 3,
4:15.

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4

CMJIPUS OPIINON

LeIers published in this column should not he construed as
cepr~,rti (hedlitorial ohinion of ThiieiDaily. Anonmouxs comn-
nuniiratin i i i srearn l. ihe names of comnnicantts
will, howexer, le regardled as conflntial upon request. (Contrib-
P us ari-:1akd lo ie ure . conining theselves to less than 30o
wtordls ii 3x . ide
Mcn Have Tried It Since 5000 B.C.-
And Always Paid

Daily Grandfathers:

Undaunted by the crushing blow dealt to a rising
ause by that master of publications, The Michigan
]aily, except Monday, The Optimist still carries on
1 its effort to institute a "sponge week" wherein the
irens will in different ways atempt to entertain the
nale element of the school.
According to Joe College, who has stated that- our
roposed plan will hold about as much water as a
ottomless seive, the high school student has not the
aitiative to start something original. Well, we're
orry that we had to get the idea from some Eastern'
olleges because the only pointers we could obtain

1

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