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January 16, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ition in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to
sident until 3:30; 11,30 a. m. Saturday.

z.: --

;.

XLI. SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 1932 No.81,
NOTICES
lifying Examination for Directed Teaching: All students expect-
elect Education D100 (Directed Observation and Teaching) or
orrelated Course in Education) next semester are required tot
iualifying examination in the subject matter in which directed
is to be done. This examination will be held in the Auditorium
rniversity High School this morning from 9 to 12 o'clock noon.
s writing examination in English required to come from 1 to 3.
xpecting to engage in directed teaching the first semester of
school year should plan to take the examinations from 9 to 12
rday, May 21, in the Auditorium of the University High School.
C, O. Davis, Secretary, School of Education.

versity Women: All women students who intend to change
at the end of this semester should advise the househead and
ce of the Dean of Women of this intention before this noon (four
efore the beginning of the second.semester). Alice C. Lloyd.
ineering Students: All students in the College of Engineering
eport conflicts in time of Final Examinations td C. H. Fessenden,
33 West Engineering building, at once,
D, Pii Eta: Group picture will be taken at Dey's Studio, 1 o'clock.
MEETINGS TODAY
Delta Kappa: Luncheon meeting at the Michigan Union at 1'
f'he speaker is P. T. Rankin of Detroit and his subject will be,
ter Education-A Preview of the 1932 Yearbook of the Depart-
E Superintendence."
eption for Graduate Students: Informal reception, followed by
and bridge, for Graduate School students at the Womerf's Ath-
lding, from 8:30 until 12 o'clock. The wives and husbands of
students are also invited.
mopolitan Club "midget olympics," at 8 p. in., in Lane Hall. Rep-
ive games from different countries will be played, followed by
al hour and refreshments. The meeting is open to the public
tie usual condition; there will be a, nominal charge to non-

LAW ENFORCEMENT
IN HAWAI WILL BE
STUDIED__BY UN So'
Thorough Overhauling' of Its
Legal Machinery May
Be Result.
REQUESTED BY SENATE
Richardson, Assistant Attorney
General, to Head Group
of Investigators.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15. - (A)
A thorough overhauling of the law
enforcement machinery in the Ha-
waiian islands may result from a
study to be conductea. on tie spo
immediately by Seth W. Richard-
so, assistant attorneya eneral.
Outcome of the Massie-Fortes-
cue incident in Honolulu the j us-
tice department investigation, re-
quested by senate resolution, took
definite form Thursday night with
announcement of detailed instruc-
tions from Attorney General Mitch-
ell to his assistant.
Richardson will leave at the ear-
liest possible time with a staff of
six or more aids; will study every
angle of the local enforcement ma-
chinery with a view to possible
recommendations for charges, and
will go also into the operation of
federal courts there in prohibition
and narcotic cases.
To Cover All Phases.
Mitchell made it clear he was
not in any way prejudging the
agencies of justice in the islands,
nor intimating that reorganization
was needed, but he asked Richard-
son to study courts, police, jury sys-
temns and. parole board.
He is to ascertain whether under
present administration of the or-
ganic law of the islands jurors of
the best type are obtained; whether
the parole system is operated on
modern lines; whether the efficien-
cy and discipline of the police are
open to improvement and similar
points.
At the same time he was given
blanket authority to "go into any
phase of the matter that you deem
advisable."
The Massie-Fortescue case will
be gone into from the ground up,
gathering information on the spot
in complete disregard of already
accumulated statements, so as to
avoid any distortion and exaggera-
tion.

WAGE CUTS FAIL TO HALT HOOVERF DAM WORK

Although more than 125 workmen have been causing trouble over a recent reduction of wages, con-
struction of the huge Hoover dam on the Colorado River near Las Vegas, Nev., has not been delayed. Men
are shown putting up retaining walls that will support the new road to lead over the top of the dam.'

MELLON HAD PA!
IN COLO MBIA9LOJ
Representative of Treasury H
Replies to Impeachment
Proceedings.
ATTACK LRD BY PATMi
Texas Democrat Charges Mei
Influenced Bankers to
M:ke Loan.

.WASHINGTON, Jan. 15.-
An emphatic denial that A
W. Mellon had any conn
with a loan to Colombia w,,
before a House committee to
Ihis behalf.
It was voiced by Alexan
Gregg, representing Mr. Mel]
replying to the impeachmen
ceedings brought by Rep. Pa
(Dem.), Texas. Gregg read
Judiciary Committee a stat
dictated by Mellon.
Refutes Patman's ChargE
He defended Mellon agair
Patman's charges. One of
had sought to; link Mellon
influencing American bankc
make the loan. The loan wen
,ard to Colombia 10 days aft
governmeit of that countr.
granted a valuable oil conc
to the Mellon-controlled Gt
Corp.
The State Department ha
mitted that it helped influen
bankers to make the loan bt
denied there was any cone
between the loan and the gn
of the concession.
Francis White, assistant sec
of state, refused'today to tur:
to the Senate Finance Corn
letters exchanged between ti
partmefnt and its Colombian
tion.

der'

Masonic Students: There will be a meeting of the Craftsmen Club
30 p. m., in the Masonic Temple.
COMING EVENTS
soiree Dramatique of the Cercle Francais will take place Monday
ing, Jan. 18, promptly at 8:15 o'clock, at the Laboratory Theatre
ner Mimes). On the program are three one-act French plays, one
hich is to be played by Members of the Faculty of the Romance
;uages Department, and the others by students in French. French
.songs will be rendered by a group of students in costume of Bre-
e. Free admission to those presenting at the door cards of associate
bership in the Cercle Francais. These cards can be procured from
office of the Secretary of the Romance Language Department, or
te door at the time of the performance.
[1andscape Club: Short meeting Monday, Jan. 18, at 7:30 p. in., in
department rooms. Discussion of various methods) and mediums of
asentation.-
Theta Sigma Phi meeting Tuesday evening at 7:15, League. Sug-
ons for chapter constitution due, and all members required to be
int-.
Jniversity Women Students: Students who are going by bus 'to De-
for the recital by Miss Mary Wigman will meet at the League on
lay evening. The bus will leave the front entrance of the League
lay at 6:45 p. in., sharp.
tobin Hood: Additional tryouts at the Laboratory Theatre, Tuesday,
19, at 8 p. in., sharp. Several principal roles still open. All enrolled
ants eligible. Bring memorized song with sheet music or accompan-
Also a dozen memorized lines from some standard play.
Philippine-Michigan Club meeting in Lane Hall at 3 p. in., Sunday.
dichigan Dames meeting Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 8 p. in., Lane Hall
members will be initiated.
teligious Open Forum: Prof. Roderict D. McKenzie, of tie Sociology
,rtment, will lead a Religious Forum Tuesday at 4:15 p. in., in Room
lumni Memorial I-tall. His topic is: "The Church in Social Recon-
tion."
3ishop Edwin I ._Hughes will speak at the FirstMethodist Church at
Sunday evening on the subject of "Mammonism," under the aus-
of the Wesleyan Foundation. In the morning Dr. Frederick Fisher
peak at the usual hour on "Finding the Good Life."
Vesley Hail: Sunday, 6 p. in., "The Affect of Zionism on the Ameri-
Few," is the topic which is being led by Miss Josephine Stern. At 12
:k the regular classes wil be held with pr. Carrothers, Dr. Blakeman
Mr. Pryor.
St. Andrew's Church Services: Sunday 8 a. in., Holy Communion;
a. in., Church School Service; 11 a. m., Morning prayer and sermon;
p. m., Evensong, Rev. Henry Lewis will preach this Sunday morn-
n "The Kingdom of God and Human Society.".
Barris Hall: The class conducted by Mr. Lewis in "The Christian
sophy of Life," will meet at the Hall at 9:30 Sunday morning. Sup-
will be served at 6:15 Sunday evening after which Prof. Stuart A.
tis, of the Education Dept. will speak to the students at the Hall.
Evangelical Students: All students are invited to a free supper and
talks by students-who attended the Student Volunteer Convention
recently in Buffalo, which is to be given in the Bethlehem Church
e, 432 S. Fourth Ave., on Sunday,'Jan. 17, at 5:30 p. m.
3uffalo Conference Delegates meet at 4 p. in., Sunday in the Com-
e Room of Lane Hall.

J. B. KENNEDY, EDIT(
OF CELEBRITIES
John B. Kennedy, associate editor
of Collier's, who is to speak here
Jan. 27 on the lecture series of the
Oratorical Association, is a journal-
ist of wide and varied experience.
Mr. Kennedy has probably inter-
viewed as many celebrities as any
journalist of the present day, and
his quest for interviews has led him
all over America and Canada, Eng-
land and the Continent. The scope
of his interviews has been even
wider thantheir geographical loca-
tion, Old-time pugilists like John
Kilrain and Sam Langford; talent-'
ed beauties like Jane Cowl, Kather-
ine Cornell and the late Jeanne
Eagles; business men like John D.
Rockefellersjr., and educators such
as the late Chas. W. Eliot, all have
President, Daily Get
Congressman's Reply
(Continued from Page 1)
ord is that I have been quick to
rectify it or apologize,
"If you want a transcript of my'
testimony before the Senate Manu-
factures Committee with reference
to college drinking here and
abroad, Iwill send it to you.
"What I said' was correctly quot-
ed in the Associated Press dispatch
which was printed, in -the Detroit
News of January 12th as follows:
"Representative Clancy told the.
Committee, schools in Toronto
and Kingston, Ontario, where beer
is sold, are not suffering like those
at Ann Arbor, Michigan, from high-
powered gin and moonshine whis-
ky."
"I also referred to better drink-
ing conditions at Oxford Univer-
sity, England, where I stayed for
two weeks.
"Warren Francis, reporter for the
Detroit Free Press, was present
when I testified before the Senate
Committee and his dispatch in the
Detroit Free Press of January 13th,
is practically the same as that of
the Associated Press story. With
highest respect, I am,
"Sincerely yours,
V "Robert H. Clancy."

OR- INTERVIEWER
WILL SPEAK HERE
been "covered" by this indefati -
able reporter, indicating the widely
varying fields into which his inter-
viewing work has led him. His re-
portorial experience covers the re-
porting of a Papal coronation-
and practically every phase of news
reporting from that point to sleu-
thing a Chicago gang murder.
During the past year, 'Mr. Ken-
nedy has won considerable renown
as a radio announcer, in charge of
Collier's Hour. His radio talks have
been called "the biggest little feat-
ure on the air."
Extended experience as a news-1
paper reporter and journalist has,
afforded Mr. Kennedy an extraor-
dinary opportunity to accumulate
material for an address on "Per-
sonalities." His penchant for in-
terviewing has led him into crowd-
ed capitals of Europe, into out-of-
the-way places in this country and
the Continent, and the democratic
scope of his interviews covers a
wide range of "high-brow" and
"low-brow" contacts.
He has discussed with the late
Chas. W. Eliot, of -Harvard, the fun-
damentals of education; with John
Kilrain and Sam Langford the
gentle art of knocking an oppon-
ent's countenance gally west. John
D. Rockefeller jr., has contributed
to his note-book salient material'
on business and sociological prob-
lems, and talented and beautiful
women like the late Jeanne Eagles,
erstwhile star of "Rain," Jane Cowl
and Katherine Cornell, have chat-
ted with him on problems of in-
terest to women.
In reportorial days Mr. Kennedy
won a reputation as a colorful and
discerning writer. Whether he
"covered" a Chicago murder or the
coronation of a Pope, his descrip-
tion evidenced the possession of a
keen mind and an exceptional
"nose for news."
In war days Mr. Kennedy was
associated with Herbert Hoover in
relief work. Decorations from the
governments of France and Bel-
gium indicate the thoroughness of
his application to the tasks that
fell him.

CURT'IS TO OBSERV
E[CLIPSE_ IN MAINE
Photographs to Be Taken Next
August in Northeastern
United States.
(Continued from Page 1)
eclipse. Several other member's of
the observatory staff will be pres-
ent 'at the eclipse.
As ^the shadow path cast by the
moon at a solar eclipse is generally,
only about 120 miles wide, such
eclipses are relatively rare scienti-
fic happenings, and astronomers
who wish to observe these evanes-
cent but beautiful phenomena must
frequently journey long distances
in order to locate within the sha-
dow. This will make the eleventh
eclipse which Dr. Curtis has observ-:'
ed, visiting three times in Sumatra,
and to Russia, Mexico, and Labra-
dor. He has traveled a total off'
about 100,000 miles in order to do
less than half an hour of actual
eclipse work.
- Since the advent of photography
and modern scientific methods of
studying such phenomena, t h e
world has had just about one hour
to study the mysterious appendage
of the sun called the corona, which
can be seen at no other time. While
the Maine eclipse will add only a
minute and a half to this 'total,
even this brief interval means an
addition of nearly three per cent
to that which has been done be-
fore.

Mellon Statement Read.
Gregg read a statement he
was dictated' by Secretary Me
This statement said.
"Mr. Mellon says that he
President Olaya at one of the st
functions and, of course, conve
with him,' but such conversa
was general and respecting fir
cial and other conditions in Col
bia.
"Mr. Mellon had no conversat
with President Olaya that ha
do with the sq-called Barco
cession nror the Gulf Oil Corp.,
with any suggestion whatever,
leged or implied, 'as to any sup
or assistance upon the part of
government with respect to Col
bia obtaining credit.
- TWO PANTS SPRING SUIT
$28 and up
Suit Pressed, 20c
All kinds alterations at cost
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319. South Jniversity

' ]Efficiency is Vital.
The federal court part of the in-
quiry, unconnected with the" pres-
ent case, was ordered by Mitchell
because, he held, efficiency of fed-
eral statute enforcement had a vi-,
' tal bearing on the general crime
situation.
Richardson was specifically ad-
vised to go into the rules of evi-
dence in criminal cases, such the
law preventing conviction in as-
sault cases solely on evidence of
the prosecutrix Mitchell said it
was not clear to him that corrobo-
ration should be required on iden-
tity of the offender, if the fact that
force had been used was properly
established.
Sadler, Pack Invited
Into Military Group
Prof. W. C. Sadler, dean of the
engineering college, and Philip C.
Pack, publicity director of athletics,
will be initiated as associate mem-
bers to Scabbard and Blade, hon-
orary military, fraternity, at an ini-
tiation banquet to be held in the
Union Thursday night, Jan. 21.
Gov. Brucker to Speak
at Legion Convention
Governor Wilber M. Brucker will
speak at thesdistrict convention of
the American Legion in Ypsilanti,
Sunday, January 31. The meeting
is under the auspices of the Wash-
tenaw County council of the Legion.
A banquet in the evening is plan-
ned. Leslie Kefken, state comman-
der and Robert Byers, state adjut-
ant are other speakers on the pro-
gram.
Liberal Students Union: Sunday
evening, Miss Elsie Wulkop of Bos-
ton will speak on "Social Signifi-
cance of Birth Control." Unitarian
Church.
TY PEWRI TERSI
All k-ore
Sold Rented FEc ged Repaired
Large choice stodk eye3=.
0 oD. MORRI L L
314 o State St., Ann Arbor.

FL SHEI

Most $10.00 and $11.00 Styles Now

I l

TO THE

AN OFTHE HOUSE

ForA
Short Time

Suppose you had to do the cooking in your home, 365 days a
year. Wouldn't you demand the most modern, up-to-date equip.
me",tobtainable, to help you prepare your "three a day"? You
can bet you 'would! You'd choose equipment as modern as ,the
machines you use in your business. And like many of those
machines, your kitchen equipment would be electrical. First of all
you'd choose an electric range-
and your keen sense of practical
value would make that range an 10 seated-In Ha
Electrochef. You owe your wife Flavor to 1 SUM
this modern kitchen stove to help Sung
her in her work. You owe the
family and yourself this better
cooking. Its healthfulness is as coHealthCue
im portant a factor as its utterFle l s. ci s n r
and essential food values are re-
tained. Meats and vegetables cook
to melting tenderness in their
own juices, with all their natural
flavors sealed-in. Decide todv to
buy your wife an Electrochef
electric range.

ct as
:Iy
:t ae

Only

e

Stationery Specials 49c each

250 Pairs, Special!
Styles' $11.00 and
$12.00 Values.

150 Pairs
Broken Lots
Closing Out at
.$ -8

IMPERIAL VELLUM WITH MICHIGAN SEAL,
Ur
1 POUND .CRUSHED PARCHMENT (.0 SHEETS)

M1

ALL OTHER MAKES REDUCED TO
A9 W5 ;n l'n

-THE -

r

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