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January 15, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CANADIAN\ TRA[PPER[
DEIEIS POICEMEN
Accused of Shooting Constable
in Charge of Trapping
Investigation;
EDMONTON, Alta., Jan. 14.-(/P)
-Beyond the Arctic circle, near the
mouth of the broad MacKenzie,
mounted police planned anew to-
day attempts to capture a hermit
trapper accused of wounding a
constable.
One expedition to his lonely
cabin up the old Yukon trail from
Aklavik, N. W. T., was thwarted
when the trapper, Albert Johnson,
greeted it with rifle fire.
He held eight men off for 15
hours. The posse withdrew when
its supplies became low. Another
patrol was believed making the
trip to the cabin today.
A report to the mounted police
headquarters here said the second
patrol was to work from a new
base at the mouth of Rat River,
20 miles below Johnson's cabin.
The officers believe the trapper to
be demented. His isolated cabin
sits on a brush-covere' promon-
tory.
Hastily-constructed bombs were
thrown at the cabin, wrecking the
door, and Johnson then moved into
a tunnel beneath the floor and
continued his fire.
The man was accused of shoot-
ing Constable A. W. King when
ing and Constable R. G. Mc-
Dowell went to his cabin several
days ago to investigate complaints
of Indians that their trap lines
were being tampered with. A shot
fired through the door hit King,
but he was brought back to Akla-
vik by dog team and will recover.
The arctic twilight hindered the
besiegers of the stronghold.
Unoiversity Faculty Men!
Give Detroit Lectures
Prof. A. S. Aiton and Leonard
Manyon of the history department,
lectured Tuesday before Detroit
audiences.
"The Latin American Background
of International Relations" was the
subject of Professor Aiton's address,
delivered before the Women's Coun-
cil on International Relations on
Tuesday afternoon at the Statler
hotel. 'his was the first of a series
of lectures on international affairs,
in which members of the history
and political science departments
will take part.-
Mr. Manyon spoke Tuesday night
at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

nun (Al Smith Proposes DIARY OF AUTHOR
Prohibition Repeal DISCUSSED ON AIR
i I11 Vby State MeetingS Hornberger Says Journal Helped
TU U K , \T [ Author Develop Stories.
Repeal of prohibition through Through Hawthorne's diary, we
Bear Forces Withdraw; Tobacco conventions by states is the new are able to find out how he col-
Leads With Material "way out" suggested by "Al" Smith1 lected and developed his story
)Gains. in this week's edition of Liberty ideas, said Theodore Hornberger,
magazine, puinished yesterday. In instructor in the English depart-
NEW YORK, Jn. 14.-U)--The te same ar zcee Smitn makes an ment, yesterday afternoon in his
allusion to Governor Franklin D. broadcast over, the University-of-
wholesale desertions from the bear Roosevelt when he says: "It is easy the-Air radio program.
camp were accompanied by a to talk about state's rights in the "Only occasionally do autlhors
further vigorous extension of the abstract." tell us about their methods; the
recovery in the stock market today. "If there is a cure for democra- good story-tellers, in fact, often do
eoveryhhrcy," he states, it is more democracy. not know where their stories come
Feverish short covering in the The only solution of the liquor from." Hawthorne filled his diary
first half hour was accompanied problem is for the federal govern- with ideas which he interspersed
by numerous advances of 1 to 4 ment to turn it back to the states with descriptions and comments
points, and while trading turned where it was since the beginning from his own experinece.
qht gof government. We can do no bet- "In these notebooks it is often
quieter thereafter, the list general- ter than to let the people express possible to see the germ of one of
ly maintained a firm tone. After themselves through their consti- his stories in a single sentence or
midday, however, there was some tuted agencies. The simplest form paragraph, said Hornberger. Later,
recession from the best. of public assemblage for represent- sometimes after many years, this
Tobaccos led the advance. The ative government Is the convention germ or story idea is picked up and
American Tobacco issues and Lig- by states, and it is clear to me that developed."
gett' and Myers and Reynolds class it we are to have a referendum of Hawthorne's usual method in
B shares advanced 2 to more than the people it should be in such writing p story, he stated, is to
3 pointssform." "take a story idea; first, add a sense
Siincluded the American Telephone Smith points out that before the of mystery or suspense; second, use
Amcand anheAeuc tipon, Al- passage of the prohibition amend- the observable details of life; and
Amercan Can, Air tion, -ment the Anti-Saloon league cam- third, top the whole with a moral.
lied Chemical, Crucible Steel, Colo- paigned for local option which was Hawthorne's stories sometimes
radb Fuel, Republic Steel preferred, voted upon favorably by localities s e e m old-fashioned, Hornberger
Lehman Corp., Case, Underwood which gave a very small vote to went on, particularly when they
Elliott, National Surety, Santa Fe, the Prohibition party. The great wrestle with deeply rooted moral
Union Pacific, New Haven and Pull- difference between prohibition and questions. "Yet all the history of
man, Eastman moved up more than local option, he said, was the fact story-telling prophesies that our
a point to above 46, or sone 10 that local option bans only the contemporary conventions and pre-
points above its recent low, public sale and consumption of jyices will in another eighty years
liquor. be quite amusing."
G ,Uthe Will Presid e

THIS
ACLUMN
CLOSES
AIT3 P.M.

A SSIF I

ADVERTISING

AT

NOTICE
TYPEWRITERS, all makes, bought,
sold, rented, exchanged, repaired.
0. D. MORRILL, 814 So. State.
307c
LAUNDRY--Soft water. 21044.
Towels free. Socks darned. 2,1c
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-I
GRAPHING promptly and neatly
done. 0. D. MORRILL, 314 So.
State St. 308c
DANCE every Friday and Saturday
night to Reade Pierce and his
orchestra at Arberter Grove,[
South Grove St., Ypsilanti. Men
50c, ladies 10c. 381
YOU can now make permanent
photograph records at Calkins-
Fletcher Drug Co's., State Street
Store. Prices are reasonable-50c
and up, depending on size. 379
NOTICE-Will the person who has
wrong reefer acquired by ex-
change in Library Wednesday
please call 4618. for adjustment.
FOR SALE ____
REPOSSESSED CARS-Buy from
Finance Company for balance
due. 311 W. Huron. Phone 22001.
235
Phone 7112, Killins Gravel Co.
295c
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Modern 6 rooms anda
bath, heat and water furnished.
Also garage and fridgedaire. 374
Available Feb. 1st. '1139 Martin
Place. Phone 4812 or 4980. 374
FOR RENT: ROOMS FOR MEN!
SINGLE $3.50 DOUBL E $2.50
Hot and cold runing water in
each room.,I, MA dsecrvice. We

furnish all bed linens. Showers.
Lounging room with radio.
FLETCHER HALL
Opposite Intramural Building
378c
FOR RENT-Large warm rooms for
girls in approved house. Price
reasonable. Call 21136. 375
TWO single rooms, and one suite
of rooms, reasonable. 507 South
Division. 382
bFOR RENT-Modern furnished and
unfurnished apartment; 3 rooms
and bath; close to campus;_ rea-
sonable. 419 N. State. Phone 4383.
380
FOR RENT-Suite and singles in
desirable location; reasonable.
429 South Division. 366
LOST
LOST-One grey note book, lef t in
Slater's. Finder please notify C.
A. Weymouth, 715 Church. 383
BOARD

HOME COOKED MEALS,
week. 512 Mack Road.
23535.

.00 a

Associated .Pressa=Photo

Oliver Wendell Holmes resigned
as justice of the United States su-
preme court. He said the condition
of his health made it necessary for
him to retire. He will be 91 years
old the first of March.

at Museum Meeting
Dr. Carl E. Guthe, director of the
University museum of anthropology,
will leave today for Peru, Indiana
where he will preside over a meet-
ing of the Michigan-Indiana Mu-
seums Association. The meeting
will be held on January 15 and 16.
Dr. Guthe will deliver a paper
entitled "The Museum and it's Col-
lections."

If You Don't See Another Picture--
Ever-You Must See

WANT ADS PAY

* *
t.*

* *

Bi Decrease Reported in Cemetery Business
Prices of Lots Remain Practically Constant

he

;1

%#Uardsmman'l-

Although the blame cannot be'
directly placed upon the depression,
it is nevertheless true that there
has been a large decrease in the
number of deaths and therefore in
the number of burials during the
past year, according to Erwin E.I
Schmid, secretary of the Forest
Hill cemetery association. The price
of lots has not been reduced and
there is no price war in prospect.
Schmid admitted that the new
cemeteries r e c e n t 1 y constructed
have probably had an effect upon
the business of Forest Hill. But he
emphasized the fact that the latter
is a non-profit institution while the
new memorial parks are. run on a
strictly profit basis.
Asked what he thought of the,

new metal plates used in the mem-
orial parks in omparison to the
old stone monument idsa employed
by Forest Hill, Schmid said that he
preferred the monument because
it is more distinctive in appearance
than the flat plates. However, he
said, the plate is a prime charac-
teristic of the memorial park type.
Many prominent people are bur-
ied in Forest Hill including Gover-
nor 1elch,' Presidents Angell, Bur-
ton and Hutchins. The oldest burial
is Elisha Rumsey, one of the found-
ers of the city. In all about ten
thousand people are buried there
but Schmid denied rumors that the
cemetery is nearly filled to 'capa-
city. "We can supply the demand
r for more than fifty years," he said.

J TIr C

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:90

ALFRED LUNT
LYNN FONTANNE

LAST DAY

'

"Waterloo Bridge"

ROLAND YOUNG-ZAZU PITTS

0

MAE CLARKE-KENT DOUGLASS

STARTING SATURDAY

."MOONLIGHT AND
Comedy

CACTUS"

Because of reduced grain produc-
on, the number of elevators li-
nsed in Montana decreased from.
4 in 1930 to 411 in 1931.

.LOVE IN A POND"
FABLE CARTOON

...
:,.

PARAMOUNT
NEWS

David Belasco's Last Success
"TONIGHT OR NEVER"
GLORIA SWANSON

I,

Tomorrow

Night at

9 p. .nds

Slater'

reat

Sale

I

You have today and tomorrow to take advantage of books
and supplies-your most urgent college needs at drastic

reductions NEVER BEFORE OFFERED

I

. S

0

Further reductions will be made these last two days as we I

desire to end this sale in as

"bang up"a manner as it started

Iw

YOUR PATRONAGE TODAY AND TOMORROW WILL BE REPAID TO YOU IN SAVINGS

YOU WILL APPRECIATE.

k

PLEASE REMEMER WE ARE ADDING MORE BOOKS AND SUPPLIES FOR
THE FINAL TWO DAYS.

M

Sale Ends Saturday, January 16th at 9 P. M.

}

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