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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

31 """ T HE M IC H IGCAN DA ILY Y

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IEPARTM T PASWRIT ER FINDS OLD
TIME MAID DULL
NAUGURATINGOPEN Wo-en No onerst
IO~kV [II flDRYMothers.

NewIIC EqCU N

New Eqi
Fie
ALL

uipment Imported,Third
dd Re-Surfaced for
Extra Players.
WOMEN INVITED
Interclass PMr a c t i c e
to Be Held This
Afternoon.

cond

Never before has the physical
eduction department emphasized
field hockey for women as it is do-
ing this year. For the first time,
there is to be an open hockey day
held every Friday afternoon on
Palmer field.
Every woman interested in pie
game is invited to come out and
take advantage of Miss Hilda
Burr's coaching. All of the intram-
ural and interclass players are es-
pecially urged and other women
are welcome to come whether they
have had previous experience or
not as the purpose of the day is to
give every one an opportunity to
play hockey and there will be no
definite teams.
New Equipment Imported
Most of the hockey equipment
which is to be used is new this fall
and was imported from England.
Another feature is that the fields
themselves have not been in such
good condition for' years as they
now are because they were all re-
surfaced and the third field has
been prepared' to make room for
the large number of players who
are expected out.
The student in charge of this,
open day is Teressa Romani, '33,
who is hockey manager for W.A.A.
this year.
SecondInterclass Practice
This afternoon at 4 o'clock, the
Second interclass hockey practice
will be held on Palmer field and
those who were unable to come out
on Tuesday are asked either to re-
port for practice today or else to
notify their class managers when
they,,do intend to come out.
The managers are: Gladys Timp-
on, '32, who will be in charge of
the enniors; Marion Heald, '33, the
student appointed to serve for the
juniors; Frances Manchester, '34,
acting for the sophomore team;
and Billie Griffith, '35, the newly
appointed freshman manager.
There will be at least another
week of practice for the interclass
teams.bef re the actual games be-
gin and the class captains are
elected to help the managers with
the teams. Any undergraduate wo-
man who cares for hockey is in-
vited to play regardless of the

"No longer is it considered a sign
of great nobility of soul or charac-
ter for a young woman to sacrifice
her life completely in the old-
fashioned way, to care for an aged
and so often ailing mother. It is
generally considered a stupid thing
to do," states Ruth Hawthorne in
an article on Mothers and Daugh-
ters in a recent issue of the Delin-
eator.
"If the comforting of Mother de-
mands money, daughter now goes
out to earn it frankly and proudly,
rather than saving it by scanty liv-
ing as was generally done in the
Victorian days. Daughter may work
towards a successful career in her
chosen profession, but m o t h e r
shares it with her and -only too
often -runs or ruins it. Daughter.
may even marry, but the tie re-
mains to make itself felt in a multi-
tude of ways, usually in conflict be-
tween herself and her husband
about seemingly unrelated things,"
continues Miss Hawthorne.
"Sons seem to be able to avoid
the issue more easily than daugh-
ters. There are manifold reasons
for this, the main one being that
sons are male and daughters fe-
male. Even the most autocratic
mothers do not attempt to rule
their male offspring, in thought
and deed, quite as tyrannically as
they do their daughters. When they
do attempt it, they have the good
sense to wear a glove of a more
velvety texture - until a daughter-
in-law appears on the scene," Miss
Hawthorne says.
"Tolerance, humor, understand-
ing, love with no strings attached
on either side, and above all, hon-
esty within yourself and between
the two of you -these are the sum
of the parts that go to make up
the perfect whole

AM SKS COOPERAION
Students Cautioned A g a i n s t
Spread of Infantile
Paralysis.
Because of the seriousness of In-
fantile Paralysis, it is particularly
important that any person who is
even slightly ill, go to the Health
Service at once and consult a phy-
sician. This is absolutely necessary
because, although the exact method
of spreading the disease is un-
known, there is evidence that con-'
tact between sick and well people
is by far the most common method
in which it is transmited. It may
even be spread by things which
have come in contact with the sick
person such as notebooks and the
like.
The usual way in which the ill-
ness starts is with cto ach disor-
ders, so it is well to give special
attention to one's diet when there
is an epidemic around.
Dr. Margaret Bell of the Health
Service wishes to emphasize that
because the disease is striking more
older people this year than in pre-
vious epidemics, it is of vital im-
portance that extreme care be exer-
cised and those students who have
even been exposed to the disease
go into quarantine until there is
no possibility of their spreading the
illness to others with whom they
come into contact.
"There is no one who would not
rather miss a few days of classes;
which can easily be made-up, than
take the chance of giving the dis-
ease to one's friends who might be
crippled for life by it," Dr. Bell
concluded.

Women's Loans Show
Only Small Increase
Over Last Semester
"Contrary to all expectations,
the number of loans made to wo-
men students this year by the Uni-
versity is not much larger than the,
number made last year," said Miss
Jeanette Perry, Assistant Dean of
Women. "To date we have made
only seven more loans than last
year."
"Of course," she explained, "this
is partly due to the fact that the
depression was already felt so
keenly last year that there ,was a
greater increase in loans then than
there has been this year." "Evi-
dences of the present financial
strain are most apparent to us in
the cases in which students have
money tied up in banks that have
closed or in small banks that do
not wish to lose so much capital at
one time.
Miss Perry added that the total
amount of this year's loans to, wo-
men exceeded last year's by only
$313.00. "This difference is so
small," she said, "because we have
cut down on individual loans,
promising some of the students ad-
ditional aid later in the year if the
money holds out.".
"We are particularly glad to
make loans this year," concluded
Miss Perry, "because we feel that
in cases where members of the
family are out of work, it is much
better for a young woman to spend
the year in school than living at
home where work is unavailable
and the environment depressing."

Martha Cook Will Hold formal
Initiation of New Women
Sunday.
First fall teas and parties are now
in full swing in the dormitories.'
Though mostly given to'honor the,
new residents, they prove interest-
ing and novel to all attending.
Last Tuesday evening the direct-
ors of Mosher Jordan halls gave a
buffet supper in honor of Miss Eve-
line Fournier, the new assistant
director of Jordan hall.
Guests attending the affair were
the directors of the other dormitor-
ies on campus and the deans of
various organizations. Fall flowers
were used as decorations on the
tables.
This afternoon Mosher Jordan
halls are giving their opening teas,
which are to serve as 'get acquaint-
ed parties' for the new and old resi-
dents. Next week the regular teas
will begin and the first one of the
series this year is to be held in
Mosher.
Today Mrs. Barbara Bartlett, pro-
fessor of Public Health Nursing, will
pour in Mosher hall. In Jordan,
Marion Reissenweber, grad., and
Miriam L. Cortright, grad., will pour.
Autumn garden flowers gathered
from the Mosher Jordan terraces
will form the simple floral decora-
tions in both halls.
Formal initiation of the new resi-
dents of Martha Cook dormitory
will be held Sunday afternoon at
five o'clock in the Blue room of the
building. This initiation has become
a traditional affair at Martha Cook,
I and takes place every fall soon after
Orientation week is over.
Miss Gladys Young, a Michigan
We cordially invite you to
visit our shop and 'try our

graduate, and now the executive
secretary of the Girl Scouts of De-
troit, will be the speaker. She will
represent all the other alumnae
who are not able to be present.
The old residents will wear light
colored formals and the new resi-
dents will dress in light colored in-
formals.
Mar aret Elliott
MakesWorld Tour
Dr. Margaret Elliott, who has
just been appointed to the position
of professor of personell in the
School of Business Administration
is taking a world cruise during hei'
one-semester leave of absence. At
present, she is in Shanghai, China,
which she will leave for India and
the Mediterranean as she plans to
return home by way of Europe.
Dr. Elliott is one of the three wo-
men on this campus who have had
the honor of becoming full profes-
sors and is the only one so distin-
guished in the Business Adminis-
tration school.
She enjoys a national reputation
due to her work on the problems of
women employed in any form of
work in the United States.

.,ocal and Out-of Town Concert
Given by Women's Musical
Organization.
Tryouts for the University Girl.
Glee club will be held some tim
next week, according to Miss Nor
Crane Hunt, vocal instructor in tb
School of Music and director of th
Glee club. The definite time wi
be announced later. Miss Hunt wc
especially pleased with the spir
and attitude of the members of la,
year's club and is confident the
the same spirit will be repeated.
The glee club is one of the mo,
important and popular of the wc
men's organizations on the campu
Last year the group gave concert
both in Ann Arbor and in Gran
Rapids, and also broadcast severn
times over the University station c
WJR. The outstanding function c
the club was the broadcast over
national hook-up of the Nation,
Broadcasting System. The Univei
sity Girls were chosen as represen
ative of the various college women
glee clubs in the United States.
A frown has little or no cash va
ue. Nobody ever got paid for beir
disagreeable except a traffic cop..
Daily Illini.

DORMITORIES HONOR NEW RESIDENTS
WITH FIRST FORMAL TEAS OF YEAR

TRYOUTS FOR, GLE
CLUB TO BE MEL

A dahlia nine feet tall was grown
this summer in the garden of Har-
mon Wald of Warren, 0.

'';

ii

STUDENTS' ATTITUDES OF FIRST
IMPORTANCE IN PLANNING PROGRAM

-M e d i c a l Examinations Show
omen to Be in Excellent
Physical Health.

amount of previous experience sheI

nas or has not, hna.
The Ann Arbor Hockey club will "Since the student attitude is the
hold its first practice at 9:30 o'clock first thing we must consider in
Sunday morning on Palmer field. planning the physical education
Equipment will be furnished and program," said Dr. Margatet Be'll in
Miss Burr will be there to teach be- an interview yesterday, "We are try-
ginners and to help older players ing to explain these activities to
to improve their games. the women enrolled in the course
Women of the faculty, wives of in such a way that they wil under-
faculty members, graduaterstu- stand everything which is being
dents and townspeople who are in- done."
terested are invited to come out "We feel that exercise should be
at this time. a recreation and it is our aim to
Because of the fact that so many help them in developing sufficient
of the women students can not skill in sports that they will want
come out until next week, intram- to carry on after graduation from
ural hockey has been postponed the University. This is possible be-
until that time according to an an- cause of the excellent equipment
nouncement made yesterday by which we have here for every sport
Helen Townsend, '32, who is the In- in which a woman could possibly
tramural manager for the Women's be interested," he continued.
Athletic Association this year. During Orientation week, 1320
Correspondence, Stationery
--A choice assortment of good quality papers of
leading manufacturers in many sizes, shapes, and
tints, priced 35 cents up, including Michigan
stamped papers.
09.D. M~ORILL
314 South State Street
The Typewriter and Stationery Store
IF YOU WRITE, WE HAVE IT.

University students and 140 Univer-
sity high school students were given
medical examinations and Dr. Bell
stated that not only were most of
these women intelligent in regard
to what the University was trying
to accompish for them but that
never before had she found a group
so well physically.
She was surprised to find any
group of women who had such good
feet and wishes to emphasize the
fact that the students must not
spoil them by wearing improper
shoes around campus.Particularly
did she object to the custom of wo-
men high heeled pumps with no
straps on them for steady wear.
- -

PERSONALITY FINGER
WAVES
MARCELS
FACIALS
RAINWATER SHAMPOOS
MANICURES
HOT OIL TREATMENTS
STODDARD
BEAUTY SHOP
317 South State Street
(Above Quarrys) Phone 21212

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$4.S
r / 7 T

d

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FRESHLY CUT
FLOWERS
FOR THE RUSHING
PARTY

RUSH

WEEK

i

Prompt Delivery

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J

Michigan Flower
Growers

The Harper Method Office
for the scientific care of the scalp, face and hands
is located at
4403 So. Division St. Phone 4016

I

FORMALS
The most beautiful and most complete
selection in town.
CREPES-SATINS-VELVETS
PASTELS AND BLACKS

1021 Maiden Lane
Phone 21715

Sizes 12 to 42

Only rain water used for shampooing

I

tjust +nough"
Foundations
BijsuJoiIEbandettes that give just
enough support-and accent to the
bust.
Bien Jolie girdles and garter belts
that give just enough restraint-and
the swathed look today's frocks
demand
Come and see the latest in founda-
tions on display in our Corsetry
Department.

-- --- Eif

'I

A O
Annlouncing
the opening of the Robert's Shop, under the manage-
ment formerly associated with Jacobson's hat depart-

Elsewhere $25 and $30

Our Usual Popular Price

11

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ment.

We shall continue to maintain our high standards
of style and variety, and we hope our old friends will
come in and see us in our new location.

Frocks for Every Other Purpose
For Every Hour of These Busy Days
Arriving Daily
and
Complete Selections

ANNA HUGHES.

I V_ JAl-.dI

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'11 111

, AW.AF- -

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